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Tropicalsenior

What do you do when you can't stand the heat but can't get out of the kitchen?

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When its really hot up here, (which isn't very often- maybe a week or two in the summer we hit 90F-100F), we're usually out in the fields making hay. And, hubby will stay on the tractor cutting hay until 10pm if he feels like it. I need to have portable meals I can bring down to the one of the farms.  Usually, I will make sub-sandwiches,  or, if I have to go to town, I'll get a bag of deli fried chicken and a couple sides, and iced teas.   Most times, if he's cutting hay, then I'm typically in the garden working- which means I'm going to be pretty tired too. So, I need easy stuff. 

 

Evenings, when its a little cooler out, I will grill lots of chicken, burgers, or steak, saving some to eat the next very hot day(s)- over salads, or in burger form. Other things I've done in late summer, is pull potatoes out of the ground, wash them off and make loaded baked potatoes in the microwave. Since I've started pressure canning meats, I do find it much easier to speed up meal prepping. I'd never have imagined heating up a jar of taco beef or venison, for tacos, burritos or nachos  - could be so fast and easy.  So I try to can meats in the cooler in the months, and stash a few away for the hot times. 

 

 

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When I was a kid, we had no air conditioning. House had a lot of windows, high ceilings, and white asbestos siding that reflected the heat. Still, in the kitchen, it would get HOT when Mama was canning or freezing and had all four burners on the stove.

 

Our solution was to go to town to the ice house, and get a 50-pound block of ice in the No. 2 washtub. We'd set it in the middle of the kitchen floor, set the box fan on top of a kitchen chair, and aim it across the ice at the stove.

 

Made things bearable! 

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13 minutes ago, kayb said:

Our solution was to go to town to the ice house, and get a 50-pound block of ice in the No. 2 washtub. We'd set it in the middle of the kitchen floor, set the box fan on top of a kitchen chair, and aim it across the ice at the stove.

 

Large air conditioning capacity today is rated in "tons".  That came from in the old days, tons of ice was used to condition air in spaces. 

 

dcarch

 

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19 minutes ago, kayb said:

When I was a kid, we had no air conditioning. House had a lot of windows, high ceilings, and white asbestos siding that reflected the heat. Still, in the kitchen, it would get HOT when Mama was canning or freezing and had all four burners on the stove.

 

Our solution was to go to town to the ice house, and get a 50-pound block of ice in the No. 2 washtub. We'd set it in the middle of the kitchen floor, set the box fan on top of a kitchen chair, and aim it across the ice at the stove.

 

Made things bearable! 

Thanks for the memories! Until I was 12, we still had the old wood stove so things were doubly hot.

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I wear a wide cloth headband while cooking to keep my hair off my face and out of the food.  When I get hot while cooking I put an ice cube or two under the headband.  It works wonders in cooling my whole body off.

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I drink lots and lots of icy aguas frescas to stay cool and hydrated. 

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Here in central coastal Florida, I'll turn on my oven without a second thought in the summer. That's what A/C is for.   My wife thinks I'm nuts for doing my long walks in the middle of the afternoon.  Works for me.  I like to ease into the day and don't mind the heat 

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33 minutes ago, scubadoo97 said:

Here in central coastal Florida, I'll turn on my oven without a second thought in the summer. That's what A/C is for.   My wife thinks I'm nuts for doing my long walks in the middle of the afternoon.  Works for me.  I like to ease into the day and don't mind the heat 

Yup. Me too.

The BSO/CSO does offer some advantages in the summer....

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My best heat beaters are my IP, freezer and microwave. When I make soups, stews and sauces I always make more than enough for one meal and put it in the freezer. Then when it's hot, I can thaw out the extra meal in the microwave and it's quick and cool.

I also have the advantage (?) of getting up at 4:30 in the morning to get breakfast for my housemates before they go to work. I do a lot of cooking and baking then and just reheat it at dinner time. For frying things, I use my electric skillet and I do make a lot of stir frys in my wok.

I don't have much luck serving salads. My housemates are from Central America and to them, a salad is a side dish. They would never say anything, but the times that I have served salads I can sense the puzzlement, as if to say “is this all we get”. Soups and casseroles that I can finish up at the last minute as they come home from work seem to be more practical.

I do wish that the idea of cooking naked would work for me, it would save me a lot on laundry.

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39 minutes ago, Tropicalsenior said:

My best heat beaters are my IP, freezer and microwave. When I make soups, stews and sauces I always make more than enough for one meal and put it in the freezer. Then when it's hot, I can thaw out the extra meal in the microwave and it's quick and cool.

I also have the advantage (?) of getting up at 4:30 in the morning to get breakfast for my housemates before they go to work. I do a lot of cooking and baking then and just reheat it at dinner time. For frying things, I use my electric skillet and I do make a lot of stir frys in my wok.

I don't have much luck serving salads. My housemates are from Central America and to them, a salad is a side dish. They would never say anything, but the times that I have served salads I can sense the puzzlement, as if to say “is this all we get”. Soups and casseroles that I can finish up at the last minute as they come home from work seem to be more practical.

I do wish that the idea of cooking naked would work for me, it would save me a lot on laundry.

I like using my crockpot when it's hot or just when I want time for other things.  There are more and more recipes that can successfully made that way without losing flavor, texture or appearance.  

I make my mac and cheese that way now and it's still good.

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When it's hot I definitely start pickling and stop baking. Pickled/quick fermented salad = good. Or boil at night, marinade overnight for next day's lunch or dinner.

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4 hours ago, Tropicalsenior said:

I do wish that the idea of cooking naked would work for me, it would save me a lot on laundry.

 

And I can attest skin grows back in time.

 

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I simply go out to well air-conditioned places even more!

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Posted (edited)
On ‎2‎/‎28‎/‎2018 at 9:09 AM, Kim Shook said:

I have never understood folks who do all of their cooking outside in hot weather.  The last thing that I want to do when it it 90+ degrees is step one foot outdoors, much less stand over a grill.  I just crank the AC and try to do things that won't require long oven cooking - stovetop, slow cooker and large toaster oven food.

 

We have homes in FL and Mexico (and a previous home in AZ). 

 

I disagree about grilling in hot weather (or any inclement weather). 

 

I use a gas grill.  It is so well-seasoned that I get a good flavor off it. And by 'seasoned' I basically mean I never clean it.

 

I rarely stand over the grill.  My grill is 5 steps from my kitchen.  I walk out, preheat it and come back inside until it's hot enough (usually 5 minutes on this grill).  For salmon,  I take a fillet with skin (I use my own dry rub on flesh side), throw it skin-side down and go back in the house.  8 minutes later I go out, shut off gas and come back inside to ready the plates, etc.  3 minutes later I bring the salmon indoors.  It is always perfect. 

 

For pork tenderloin and lamb racks I grill 6 to 8 minutes on each side, let rest another 6 to 8 minutes, lid up.  I do not monitor these grill items...I could do them blindfolded.  

 

The only items I do watch are veggies....but the cooking time is so much less for grilled eggplant, zucchini, etc. that I am rarely outside for more than a few minutes.  

 

I also use the grill to reheat pizza.  Preheat, then all burners to low, slices on grill for exactly 5 minutes.  EZ PZ and the grill flavor improves the original flavor x10.  

 

Though our temperatures in Ajijic are mild  (under 80F) for 10 months, we can hit 90 in May until the rains start in mid June.  We don't have much humidity even in the rainy season.  Now FL...that's another story, but still I prefer grilling there...for the flavor and general lack of mess.  All my splatters go onto nearby bushes that seem to thrive on grease! 


Edited by gulfporter (log)
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