Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cold Noodles--Cook-Off 33


annecros
 Share

Recommended Posts

Welcome to the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.

This time, we're focusing on cold noodles, suggested by Society Member "Hiroyuki" as a great way to beat the Summer heat.

Some version of a cold noodle dish can be found in virtually any cusine in the world. Whether you've wanted to try your hand at Somen (Japanese cold noodles), Nang Myung (Korean), or Aunt Irene's Cold Pasta Salad let's go for it!

Let's talk about the various types of noodles and each one's virtues! Homemade vs. dried? Dressings and additions?

Nosing around the forums brought up several topics:

"Pasta Salad" the topic

"Cold Noodles w/ Szechuan v. Dan Dan Mein"

"Pasta Salad for Father's Day"

"Pasta Salad lacking Nuance"

"Nyang Mun (Naengmyun) Korean cold noodle dish"

RecipeGullet offers these great looking recipes:

"Cold Peanut Noodles"

"Orzo Salad with Apricots"

"Curried Macaroni Salad"

I am not familar with anything other than cold pasta salad with ranch dressing dumped on it (I know, I know, but my kids consider it the required side dish for BBQ) - so I am looking for cookbooks that can help me out. I am considering the following:

"The Noodle Cook Book: Delicious Recipes for Crispy, Stir-Fried, Boiled, Sweet, Spicy, Hot and Cold Noodles" by Hayto Kunumi

"Noodle" by Terry Durack and Geoff Lung

"James McNair's Cold Pasta" by James McNair

"Garde Manger, The Art and Craft of the Cold Kitchen" by The Cuinary Institute of America

Any other good cookbook suggestions out there?

Who's up for some cold comfort in July?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Anne, for adopting my suggestion. :smile:

I'd like to contribute to this thread with not only somen but also other Japanese cold noodles like hiyamugi and udon, as well as hiyashi chuka and reisei (cold) spaghetti. I'll get to them one by one.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks, Anne, for adopting my suggestion. :smile:

I'd like to contribute to this thread with not only somen but also other Japanese cold noodles like hiyamugi and udon, as well as hiyashi chuka and reisei (cold) spaghetti.  I'll get to them one by one.

I will communicate your thanks to the Kitchen Team, as it really is a group decision, and we all thought you had a great idea.

I am looking forward to your contributions and learning from you, and maybe you can answer a question I have. Are Asian noodles, as a rule, entirely different from pasta? It confuses me when I see recipes that call for spaghetti or vermicelli that are Asian. I know common knowledge says that the Chinese invented pasta, but are they truly identical and interchangable?

I am, confused. :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am on a massive thai kick right now.... anyone know of thai-inspired cold noodle dishes that they could share? Right now, of course, any hot noodle dish is a fine, albeit unintentional cold noodle dish for breakfast! :biggrin:

Jamie Lee

Beauty fades, Dumb lasts forever. - Judge Judy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are asian noodles, as a rule, entirely different from pasta? It confuses me when I see recipes that call for spaghetti or vermicelli that are Asian. I know common knowledge says that the Chinese invented pasta, but are they truly identical and interchangable?

Hi Anne,

I would separate pasta and 'Asian' noodles because they are quite different. Pasta and noodles have different textures (eg 'al dente' is desirable in pasta, but not necessarily so in noodles) and different cooking methods (eg noodles can be fried in its sauce or cooked in broth whereas pasta and its sauce tend to be cooked separately). Also different parts of Asia has different types of noodles - my observation has been that rice noodles tend to dominate in SE Asia whereas wheat noodles features a lot in Chinese and Japanese cuisine.

That said, there are many possibilities in the kitchen, and 'fusion' dishes are not uncommon these days.

:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am really excited ! I lurk on this thread but have never contributed to it. No promises this time, either, but I hope to learn a lot :wink:

Perfect timing....it is supposed to be 100' here today :sad: (Tomorrow it is cooling down, 99' :laugh: )

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made a pasta salad as part of dinner tonight but between the white pasta, the white dressing, and the white plate, the photo was way over-exposed.

At any rate, I cooked some penne rigate until a little past al dente. It was drained and rinsed with cold water. For the dressing, I mixed a tablespoon of mayo, 3-4 T. of plain yogurt, 1 T. of dijon mustard, and then some sprinklings of tarragon. S & P, of course.

That was all mixed together (as well as some cornichons split lengthwise) and stored in the fridge until dinner.

The taste was exactly what I was going for but why, oh why, does the dressing clump up when it's refrigerated?

Tomorrow I'll be trying some naengmyun for lunch!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are asian noodles, as a rule, entirely different from pasta? It confuses me when I see recipes that call for spaghetti or vermicelli that are Asian. I know common knowledge says that the Chinese invented pasta, but are they truly identical and interchangable?

Hi Anne,

I would separate pasta and 'Asian' noodles because they are quite different. Pasta and noodles have different textures (eg 'al dente' is desirable in pasta, but not necessarily so in noodles) and different cooking methods (eg noodles can be fried in its sauce or cooked in broth whereas pasta and its sauce tend to be cooked separately). Also different parts of Asia has different types of noodles - my observation has been that rice noodles tend to dominate in SE Asia whereas wheat noodles features a lot in Chinese and Japanese cuisine.

That said, there are many possibilities in the kitchen, and 'fusion' dishes are not uncommon these days.

:)

I think jean_genie put it really well. I wouldn't say they are entirely different, but they differ considerably in texture and flavor because of the difference in material (wheat, buckwheat, rice, etc. for Asian noodles and durum wheat for pasta). On the question of whether they are interchangeable, I personally say no, because they usually require different preparations and seasonings. One big difference in preparation is that Japanese noodles do not require salt when cooked in boiling water while pasta does. Another difference is that cookin al dente is not at all necessary for Japanese noodles.

I think I'll make reisei (cold) spaghetti for supper tomorrow and report back.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

OK, so there are actual differences in the product (type of wheat) in addition to the preparation method. Thanks guys. :biggrin:

Jamie Lee, I don't have a Thai cold noodle recipe for you, but have been known to eat Thai noodles cold right out of the fridge standing over the sink the next day!

When I was discussing the cookoff with hubby yesterday, he mentioned that his Oma (he was born in Freidberg en Hessen) used to serve spaetzle cold with a sort of cold and savory cherry/pepper "soup" that was actually a sauce. Is anybody out there familiar with this sort of preparation? I googled it, but had a hard time finding specifics. With all the cherries in the markets now, it might make for something interesting and tasty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love cold noodle dishes, and often whip them up with whatever is on hand. Yesterday, I made a sort of pad-Thai-ish cold noodle dish, with leftovers.

The strange part of the dish was the sauce. I was out of both tamarind and vinegar, and needed a sour component. I had some leftover raisin/caper emulsion in the fridge. I thinned it out with some water and added A LOT of fish sauce, fresh lime juice, chili, and a small touch of sugar.

I brined some frozen shrimp, and sauteed with lots of minced garlic and ginger, then set aside. In the same pan (with bits of garlic and ginger), cooked some beaten eggs in "crepe" form, which I cut into ribbons when cool and set aside. Julienned a lot of green mango and cucmber with a mandoline. Crushed peanuts in mortar and pestle.

Soaked some rice noodles (the wide, flat ones), until slightly softened, but very firm, and coated with oil. Fried the noodles in wok, and added the sauce. Let cool, ad then tossed with the shrimp, egg, mango, cucumber, and peanuts. Generous squeeze of lime juice and lots of fresh cilantro. A nice Sunday lunch.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another cold (room temperature) pasta dish I made recently:

Made dressing of minced garlic, rice vinegar, olive oil and salt. Tossed with a pound of cooked farfalle, and let marinate for awhile. Before serving, tossed pasta with diced bacon (cooked), finely chopped shallot, finely chopped sundried tomatoes, lightly blanched green peas, toasted pinenuts, generous amount of fresh parm, and fresh basil.

Edited by Khadija (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another cold (room temperature) pasta dish I made recently:

Made dressing of minced garlic, rice vinegar, olive oil and salt.  Tossed with a pound of cooked farfalle, and let marinate for awhile.  Before serving, tossed pasta with sauteed, diced bacon, finely chopped shallot, finely chopped sundried tomatoes, lightly blanced green peas, toasted pinenuts,  generous amount of fresh parm, and fresh basil.

Yum, that sounds so cool and green.

I usually use salami in pasta salads, but bacon would be tasty and add some crunch, I imagine.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I love cold noodles!

my favorite cold Asian noodles have to be the Korean style ones... I just love ice cold kimchee sesame oil and seeds mixed into buckweat or shirataki noodles...

Chop chae is great food for a potluck.. glass noodles, sesame, green onions, beef, black mushrooms ..I make this one all the time

there is also a ..the ice cold ..very popular in the summer Korean soup (that I can not remember the name right now ..argh.I am sorry) ..the broth is served so ice cold it has ice cubes in it...very chewy noodles ..micro sliced beef and veggies on top .sometimes a sliced hardboiled egg...served with white vinegar and mustartd....it is a refreshing endless slurp! ...I love that soup!

in fact I am due for some now ...and this thread is inspiring me... so I will go have some this week and then come back and make it :smile:

why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, this cook-off obviously came at the perfect time for me! It inspired pasta salad last night and cold noodle salad for lunch today.

My starting point for today's naengmyun (or reasonable facsimile thereof) was this post:

naengmyun

The local Raley's doesn't have buckwheat noodles so I opted to go with Japanese udon noodles instead. I really should have re-read SheenaGreena's post before making the sauce because I made mine just out of gochujang (affectionately known in my brain as MCP, or "magic chile paste", due to its "anti-obesitic properties") and soy sauce, combined in equal parts.

I also have no Korean-style pickles so I saved some chilled green beans from last night's dinner and added them to the mix.

Here are the ingredients for two servings, assembled:

gallery_11420_759_872.jpg

Just before serving, I drizzled each bowl with sesame oil and garnished with sesame seeds:

gallery_11420_759_14017.jpg

Fabulous!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I changed my mind and made hiyashi chuka instead.

Ingredients:

Fake crab meat

Kinshi tamago (made by first making a thin sheet of fried egg and then shredding it)

Tomatoes

Boiled enoki mushroom

Wakame seaweed

Shredded green shiso (perilla leaves)

Shredded cucumbers

It took me almost an hour to make this single dish! :blink::wacko:

gallery_16375_4595_11412.jpg

I asked my children to assemble all the ingredients together to make theirs.

Mine:

gallery_16375_4595_15213.jpg

Sorry for the very poor presentation. :sad:

We also had cold tofu and edamame (young soy beans). I had beer too (to be more precise, cheaper, third-category (malt-free) beer :biggrin: ).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Don't apologize for that! I think it looks lovely.

What are perilla leaves, and what do they bring to the dish? What do they taste like?

A description of perilla leaves can be found here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perilla

They are refreshing! But I must add that they are usually not used in hiyashi chuka. I added them simply because I like them and I can get plenty of them from my tiny vegetable garden at this time of the year.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Inspired by the cook/off, we had some cold noodles today. The dressing was based on the 2 cold noodle recipes in eGullet mentioned above. I just mixed tahini, sesame oil, peanutbutter, rice wine vinegar, and sriracha together until it looked and tasted good. Besides that, it's just noodles and cucumber and some sesame seeds. Really lovely.

It did stick together during the hour or so I kept it waiting before dinner. It seems those noodles can go on absorbing dressing forever! I added a splash of cold water just before serving, just to thin everything and make the dish slippery again instead of stodgy.

gallery_21505_2929_67876.jpg

Edited by Chufi (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry there's no camera around at the moment, but lunch sounds very similar to Chufi's, if not as prettily plated. My sauce also included soy and fish sauces, bit of hoisen, mirin, hot chili oil, garlic chili paste and some fresh Thai basil. (Now you can picture the inside door of my fridge. :smile:)

Looking forward to seeing more ideas. So far, so delicious.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Klary, did you dress the noodles while warm or did you give them a cold water bath first?

yes, I rinsed them with cold water, and did not dress them until they were cold. I know from experience that dressing them warm makes an even bigger noodleclump :laugh: They still absorbed a lot of dressing though!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to this second anniversary eGullet Recipe Cook-Off! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      A click on that index shows that, while the Cook-Offs have ventured throughout the globe, but they've never stopped in Africa. One could say we've passed through -- gumbo, for example, is widely acknowledged to have roots in Africa, among other places. So, for the first Cook-Off rooted in African cuisine, we'll be cooking up mafé, otherwise known as peanut or groundnut stew.
      Mafé is a traditional west African dish that can be found in the kitchens of Senegal and Mali. It's often served with a starch of some sort (rice, most often) to soak up the nutty stew juices, or, alternately, the starch is part of the stew itself, resulting in a drier braise. While there are a few mentions of mafé in eG Forums, there are no discussions of actually preparing it that I can find except this brief post by yours truly. There are a few recipes elsewhere, including this stew-like one and this more braise-y one, both of which are from the Food Network.
      Mafé is a forgiving cold-weather dish, and one that, like most stews, benefits from reheating (read: swell as leftovers). I'm convinced that mafé is one of the great one-pot dishes in global cuisine, built on a solid base of sautéed onions, peanut-thickened stock, and hearty meat. Like other classics such as gumbo, cassoulet, and bibimbap, it affords tremendous variation within those guides; it would be hard to find very many vegetables that haven't made an appearance in a mafé pot somewhere, and there are lots of possibilities concerning herbs and spices. (I like to increase the heat quite a bit with cayenne, which I think plays off the silk of the nut oil just perfectly, for example.)
      Finally, it's a pleasant surprise if you've never had a savory peanut dish before, and kids in particular tend to think it is the bee's knees. The kitchen fills with a heady aroma -- browned onion, ground peanuts -- that's hard to describe and resist.
      So: who's up for mafé?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...