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Cooking & Curing from "Charcuterie": Part 1

Charcuterie

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#211 Chris Amirault

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 06:33 AM

It took much, much longer to reach 150F internal temperature when baked at 200F (and I checked my oven with a thermometer and it was dead on).  The belly was quite thin yet it took almost 4 hours to reach temp. 

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I found this as well, I should add. But isn't it just amazing? I don't know why we are amazed that home-cured is better, but it's true: I'm just floored.

Vivid lop yuk porn in a sec.
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#212 Chris Amirault

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 06:40 AM

I couldn't stand the thought of waiting until dinner, so...

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It tastes remarkable, especially raw, with that unmistakable flavor of cured pork that you find in prosciutto. It is so good I can't quite believe it. The balance is excellent: I can't pick out the shaoxing, which suggests that it melted into the background of the flavor profile as it usually does. It could be a bit sweeter, though, so I'll up the sugar next time. The salt balance is excellent.

Since I have to get to work, I just decided to throw together some quick scrambled eggs -- results here.

edited to add link -- ca

Edited by chrisamirault, 16 February 2006 - 06:44 AM.

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#213 melicob

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Posted 16 February 2006 - 09:40 AM

As promised, the next series of bacon:


It looks like you were using foodsaver bags...did you just seal or did you vac and seal?

Looks awesome....


I vacced and sealed. I'm not sure if it helps, but I figured the more I can get the flavor to penetrate, the better.

#214 Chris Amirault

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Posted 17 February 2006 - 01:21 PM

A follow-up on the lop yuk.

I brought a couple of pieces of the bacon to the folks who run the Chinese store from which I've bought the homemade lop yuk in the past, and we had a conversation about methods. Apparently, the shop owner's mom brines the strips for a while initially and then marinates them before curing them. She was also adamant that one should use the best shaoxing available, one with no salt added; I have a bottle of good stuff from that store that passes muster. I also cut them too thinly according to the proprietor, so next time, along with upping the sugar, I'll slice more thickly.

Having said that, I admit to being very proud of my lop yuk! They knew I was a bit of a food nut, but they were pretty blown away to see me walk in with that little gift.

edited to fix an unclear sentence -- ca

Edited by chrisamirault, 09 June 2006 - 02:02 PM.

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#215 SethG

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Posted 19 February 2006 - 11:23 AM

Can't compete with the lop yuk, but the corned beef came out great. Best I've ever had, although a little saltier than I'd like. Ridiculously easy, and an amazing transformation of a brisket.
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#216 Pallee

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 10:06 AM

I sliced into my first peperone piece and it's very good, in spite of using too much Bactoferm. Has a nice spice level and good flavor. I think I'll use a coarse grind only next time as it seems too fine in texture.

Also made the breakfast sausage over the weekend. It improved greatly by aging overnight, the flavors married.

I had frozen some of the duck sausage and used it yesterday in a cassoulet of sorts with Rancho Gordo Runner Cannellini beans and Christmas Limas. What a treat on a cold night!

Now to get started on some bacon......

#217 kgaddis

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 02:29 PM

Has anyone tried the Coppa recipe from Rhulman's book? I got air pocket and some interior mold. I was thinking that his recipe called for a large dice 2-3inches, i was going to cut it smaller 1/4 - 1/2 inch cubes before stuffing it. Any reccomendations?

#218 jmolinari

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 02:48 PM

i have no idea where Rulhman or Brian got the idea that coppa is made with chunks. It NEVER is. It is made from a piece of the pork shoulder, a very specific piece, which is basically behing the head of the pig.

It is hard to explain without pictures where the coppa is located. In italy this is a butchered cut that is sold in supermarkets as a roast. Here you have to buy the whole shoulder (from costco or sam's or whereever) and "carve" it out yourself. Some shoulders come so mangled from the packers that it is almost unretrievable.

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#219 jmolinari

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 04:08 PM

Not a recipe from Charcuterie but cured meat nonetheless.
Salame sardo, basically a simple salame with salt, pepper, and fennel seeds, in 43mm artificial ring casings.

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#220 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 04:10 PM

Jason,

How long was that Salame Sardo cured? It looks sumptuous!

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#221 maggiethecat

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Posted 20 February 2006 - 04:18 PM

We found about five miles of perfectly good casing at the back of the fridge last night. Yippee!!

First up, the chorizo from "Charcuterie" because we had all the ingredients handy. Great flavor, and excellent texture.

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#222 jmolinari

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 06:05 AM

Ronni, it cured just about 4 weeks, 50% weight loss.

#223 jefferyc

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:12 AM

I tried the turkey sausage w/dried cherries and it seemed to me the fat/protien ratio was too high. When I tried to cook some for testing it seemed broken to me. I have a couple of questions. Have you all found it difficult to keep a sausge from brealing when the fat content is high? Will a longer spin in the mixer help? I'll try this again next week and post the results.

#224 Chris Amirault

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 10:22 AM

Just got a new slab of bacon started in the fridge, this time with brown sugar. Reports soon.

I tried the turkey sausage w/dried cherries and it seemed to me the fat/protien ratio was too high.  When I tried to cook some for testing it seemed broken to me.  I have a couple of questions.  Have you all found it difficult to keep a sausge from brealing when the fat content is high?  Will a longer spin in the mixer help?  I'll try this again next week and post the results.

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Longer spin in the mixer -- and keep the ingredients coooooooold.
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#225 Michael Ruhlman

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 01:08 PM

chris is right. cold. 33 degrees. try grinding the meat, spreading it on a sheet pan, and putting it in the freezer for 20 minutes till the fat is very stiff and the meat is on the verge of crunchy, but not frozen.

#226 Michael Ruhlman

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 01:13 PM

i have no idea where Rulhman or Brian got the idea that coppa is made with chunks. It NEVER is. It is made from a piece of the pork shoulder, a very specific piece, which is basically behing the head of the pig.

It is hard to explain without pictures where the coppa is located. In italy this is a butchered cut that is sold in supermarkets as a roast. Here you have to buy the whole shoulder (from costco or sam's or whereever) and "carve" it out yourself. Some shoulders come so mangled from the packers that it is almost unretrievable.

jason

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I deferred to brian on that one. I'd had a discussion about it with Anne Burrell, the ace dry curer at mario's italian wine merchant, where it is a whole muscle, shoulder, but she didn't say that it was a particular cut from within the shoulder.

I'd love to know specifics of inner shoulder cut if anyone knows them.

#227 FoodMan

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 02:02 PM

I tried the turkey sausage w/dried cherries and it seemed to me the fat/protien ratio was too high.  When I tried to cook some for testing it seemed broken to me.  I have a couple of questions.  Have you all found it difficult to keep a sausge from brealing when the fat content is high?  Will a longer spin in the mixer help?  I'll try this again next week and post the results.

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I made this for christmas and had no problem with fat or breaking. It was very good. I did keep everything very cold, but not frozen. I do have some pics of it early on in the thread

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#228 jmolinari

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Posted 21 February 2006 - 02:02 PM

I will post details about getting a coppa tonight. I'll detail as best as i can. It is a particular cut, it is somewhat cylindrical, and at the "top" of the pork butt. I'll describe it in writing tonight, and take pictures next time i butcher one to get it out.

jason

Edited by jmolinari, 21 February 2006 - 02:02 PM.


#229 jefferyc

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 07:58 AM

Thanks for the replies. I'll try it again next weekend and see how it goes. Oh BTW I really enjoy e-gullet.

#230 jmolinari

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 05:53 PM

Okie dokie. HEre are the best directions i can describe on getting the coppa from a whole shoulder.

Locate the shoulder blade in the butt; orient the butt so that the blade is on you left. The coppa will be on the right side. Now, If you slice the butt in half (blade piece on the left), the piece on the right will show that you cut through a large muscle with out any fat. The coppa is to the right of this muscle, so you can begin trimming the piece into a round shape. Trim off any surface fat, but leave the interior fat...you should end up with a nice coppa!!

I'll take pictures next time i butcher a shoulder.
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#231 lgrass

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 12:24 PM

Posted Image

first try curing: tuscan salami recipe, half with / half without fennel

day 4

I'll keep posting once in a while so we can see if they mature normally or bust out Akira-style with strange prismatic fungi

Edited by lgrass, 24 February 2006 - 12:25 PM.


#232 Chris Amirault

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Posted 24 February 2006 - 12:33 PM

Looks great. Where are those hanging?
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#233 Chris Amirault

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 01:54 PM

In the lead post of this thread, Elie showed his cured salmon process. I wanted to see if I could produce pretty good results using my favorite all-around cooking tool, the ziploc bag. So:

Wild king salmon on sale at Whole Foods:

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I slipped it into a snug ziploc:

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The salt and sugars:

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Skin side with the curing mixture on it:

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Our wonderful French friend, which was then sprinkled on both sides:

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The fennel sliced and ready:

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Onto the salmon -- flesh side up:

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The fennel seed and white peppercorns:

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The finished assembly, ready to go in the fridge:

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It already started to release liquid by the end of the assembly:

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It's in the fridge getting a good bit of pressure from above thanks to some black bean soup and rubber bands. More later.
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#234 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 02:44 PM

Wow, Chris, thanks for the instructive pictorial! That really looks delicious. As a fellow lover of gravlax -- and the ziploc bag -- I salute you. I'm looking forward to hearing about the results, but seriously, how is that going to be anything other than delicious? I am definitely going 'aquatic' next weekend with the Charcuterie.

Right now, I'm doing some a little smoking (whole butt and some large belly scraps). Last night I started a cure on a slab of paprika bacon and before the weekend's out, I'll be taking another stab at breakfast sausage, which I will attempt to encase, this time around. The meat's in the fridge now, co-mingling with the seasonings.

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#235 Mottmott

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Posted 25 February 2006 - 03:03 PM

I couldn't stand the thought of waiting until dinner, so...

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

It tastes remarkable, especially raw, with that unmistakable flavor of cured pork that you find in prosciutto. It is so good I can't quite believe it. The balance is excellent: I can't pick out the shaoxing, which suggests that it melted into the background of the flavor profile as it usually does. It could be a bit sweeter, though, so I'll up the sugar next time. The salt balance is excellent.

Since I have to get to work, I just decided to throw together some quick scrambled eggs -- results here.

edited to add link -- ca

View Post


:angry: That does it! I've resisted. Another cookbook? where will I put it? Oh, yes the gravlax kickoff almost did me in, but, after all, I have a pretty good gravlax from Samuelsson. Now it's all I can do to not rush out, this minute, to the bookstore to get a copy. Doomed, doomed, I say. :unsure: :unsure: :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
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#236 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 02:41 PM

My second attempt at breakfast sausage was pretty disastrous. I tried to use smaller, sheep casings this time around and they were busting open constantly. I think that the smallest horn which came with my stuffer was still too large for the casings. I was having trouble sliding them off the horn as the sausage came out. Eventually, the casings would stop sliding off and the sausage would burst through. FWIW, the modified recipe I tried (omit ginger, add 2 T of dry sage, double the black pepper, add 1 T of red chile flakes) tasted delicious, so it wasn't a total wash.

I've now got about 5# of bulk sausage in the fridge, stiffening as we speak. And I have to leave the house shortly. Tonight, after I return, I'll try to remix it into a softer state and at least fill larger casings with it.

My butcher showed me some casings he uses which are already pre-threaded onto a piece of removable plastic. You still soak them first but afterwards, you simply slide the entire casing onto the horn and pull out the plastic backing. This option suddenly has great appeal for me. :biggrin: I'm going to ask him for a couple the next time I see him.

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#237 Chris Amirault

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 07:02 PM

My butcher showed me some casings he uses which are already pre-threaded onto a piece of removable plastic.  You still soak them first but afterwards, you simply slide the entire casing onto the horn and pull out the plastic backing.  This option suddenly has great appeal for me. :biggrin:  I'm going to ask him for a couple the next time I see him.

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Ron, do they look like this?

Posted Image

Those are the ones I get from Whole Foods. A bit more than I'd like to spend, but they're clean, easy to use, and ready to go.
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#238 ronnie_suburban

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Posted 26 February 2006 - 08:00 PM

Yes, those look very similar. I didn't realize WF was a source for them. Thanks for the heads up.

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#239 Chris Amirault

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 05:26 AM

Like many good things at the WF butcher shop, you gotta ask -- wouldn't want those ugly things in the case, Ron. :wink:
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#240 mdbasile

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 08:50 AM

Just made my second batch of both classic brauts and Duck/garlic sausages. Using my Kitchenaid for grinding & stuffing... The Duck filled easily and prefectly, but I have been having problems with the Brauts - the filling is really sticky and does not fill without really pushing it hard into the filler wheel.

Any other experiences?

I just got my bactoferm so this weekend I am going to try some Tuscan...

.... and maybe some bacon while I am making a mess.....

This stuff is fun!!





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