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The Terrine Topic


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#61 bleudauvergne

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 09:26 AM

Elie, that looks great. I recognize the mustard in on the plate, but what's that other sauce you've got there?

I wonder if anyone would care to discuss the salt question.

The biggest struggle I end up with the fact that since I generally under salt my cooking, my terrines end up being a bit bland. It is surprising how some ground up meat which is sauteed and tasted, can taste more flavorful because it is warm. The real trick is patience -- cook up a bit of your terrine and let it COMPLETELY cool to see if it is seasoned well enough. I can't tell you how often I've ended sprinkling fleur del sel over slices of a finished terrine just to give it enough 'umph.


I've followed Jane Grigson's Charcuterie and French Pork Cooking a few times, and it's worked fine, although I tend to undersalt as well. It's surprising how much you need to put in these things.


I hope I haven't oversalted the rabbit terrine I've got in the fridge. I found myself sprinkling in salt everywhere in the whole process because I know that with food served warm, a salty taste comes through much more clearly than with than cold food. I have always tried to be mindful of that. However I think I may have been a bit too mindful this time. Anyway, the juice that came out when I pressed it was pretty salty.

One source I haves notes that in meat terrines the rule of thumb is 10 grams per kilo. I should retrace my steps and add up all of the salt I added along the way...

OK the marinade contained a pinch of salt. And the ham was salty. The fatty pork was not. The duxelles had salt a pinch and a half of salt. I did not salt the stock. I did add about a teaspoon more salt at the end. That's probably adding up to about - What the heck am I doing? I shouldn't be worrying about this terrine, I should taste it. If it tastes right, then I can remember so I can be sure to do the same thing the next time. If its oversalted, I'll have to be sure to measure and weigh and try for a certain salt level next time. Notes, must keep better notes...

#62 FoodMan

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 09:36 AM

Thanks for the kind words, I was very proud of my very first terrine. ALthough I should not have cut the recipe in half and I should've ended up with three layers instead of two. I was worried it might be too much for my mold. Oh, well, now I know.

The other sauce is actually onion marmalade.

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#63 SethG

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 10:43 AM

Seth- yours looks great, did you use Peterson's recipe from his Duck cookbook? I have the book and I want to try his recipe. I am not sure which one though, he has a tradional one and one with parsley. The both look excellent.

Elie

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Thank you! I didn't know Peterson had a duck book. My recipe came from Glorious French Food.

Your terrine looks great, Elie.
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#64 Carolyn Tillie

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 11:01 AM

A couple of things... Funny that the dark condiment was onion confit. I thought it was Moutarde Violet, my favorite spread on country pate!

Regarding the vegetable terrine, Lucy, I have made them with and without gelatine. Granted the ones with gelatine seem to hold better for slicing, but if I'm in a rush and its just for Shawn and I, then I might forego gelatin (which I usually make with some form of vegetable juice; carrot, tomato, bell pepper, etc.)

Foodman, your pate looks great, but where are your cornichons!?!?!? <grin>

#65 bleudauvergne

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 11:47 AM

The English pork pie is basically a terrine after all.

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Technically, it is more a pâté. The original pâtés of France were encased in dough and kept for a long time. Now the distinctions are somewhat blurred, but it is commonly understood that a terrine is a preparation of meats/fish/forcemeats/vegetables etc. baked in an earthenware dish (the terrine), and a pâté en croûte is baked in a case of dough in some mold or terrine. But some preparations called "pâtés" are actually terrines, so there you go.

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This explains, Ptipois, why in a 16th edition of a cookbook dated 1922 terrines are listed at the end of the book under "conserves". The following recipes (and I am absolutely serious) are included: Terrine de thrush and lark (in which 12 and 24 of each respectively are used), duck, partridge, foie gras, galantine of snipe!

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This is the terrine illustrated for the foie gras.

#66 mizducky

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 11:52 AM

Fascinating. The one and only time I ever attempted to make a terrine, it was a vegetable one, using a recipe from the Victory Garden cookbook. It looked gorgeous, but I apparently way underseasoned it, as it was extremely bland in flavor. Kinda discouraging considering the amount of labor that went into it. But y'all are tempting me to have another go at some kind of terrine sometime ...

Question: head cheese counts as a kind of terrine, right? I have an unholy passion for the stuff, which I have to indulge in solo because I've yet to meet anyone else who can even abide the thought of it. I am sorely tempted to try and actually make some, one of these centuries--assuming I could find even find a whole calf's or pig's head to buy, let alone the courage to mess with it. (Needless to say, I'd also have to pick a time when Fearless Housemate was out of town for several days--bet a culinary stunt of this sort would have him running away screaming. Though that might be fun to watch ... :wacko: :laugh: )

Edited by mizducky, 19 April 2005 - 11:58 AM.


#67 M. Lucia

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Posted 19 April 2005 - 02:22 PM

Lucy, For the roasted vegetable terrine I described earlier I do not use gelatin. I usually make it the day before so that it can rest at least overnight.

I have made vegetable aspics which obviously use gelatin, but I wouldn't really call these terrines.

#68 J Acord

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 08:38 AM


Adam, do you have any suggestions for where to get caul in Edinburgh? I've tried a couple of butchers to no avail.

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I would love to know as well. I have asked a few times and the butchers say that it is possible, but resturants tend to pre-order it (which ones I wonder, I have never seen any evidence of it). Oddly I was taking to a friend about this today he mentioned that he got his from a Turkish butcher. Sadly, this is in London.

Good back-fat is also an issue.

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Adam, next time you're down I'll give you some caul. Having just found it for sale I'll now have to make some dishes to use it in (braised ox-tail with a mushroom farce wrapped in caul perhaps?)

I have also used back-fat in the past (though I tried slicing it myself, quite difficult to do to get big enough peices to line the terrine) but usually end up using something like bacon or parma/serrano instead as it is just that bit easier to find/work with.

#69 Adam Balic

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 08:44 AM

J - once again you fall for my cunning 'poor little me' act. Bahahahahahaah!

But, caul sound good, tah. :biggrin:

#70 Blondelle

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 08:48 AM

I'm surprised with cookbooks on every topic you can think of there aren't any new updated ones on terrines & pates. They also would have been perfect for the low carb craze. I would love to see a cookbook that focuses on the beauty of them with fresh, bright colored vegetable ones where the design is also important when you cut slices, and see the patterns and colors. Ones that would be uncomplicated and easy to make with seasonal ingredients. Actually they could be the perfect one dish meal with meat and veggies combined. I think it's the complexity of the traditional ones that have kept these from everyday fare. Any cookbook authors here want to give it a shot?

#71 Adam Balic

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 09:04 AM

I have see some very interesting non-english books on the subject, but there seem to be a lack of such books in English.

J Acord and I have discussed the possiblity of using the enzyme discussed in this thread to create some interesting geometric forms, without too much difficulty.

Meat Glue

#72 FoodMan

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 09:22 AM

Foodman, your pate looks great, but where are your cornichons!?!?!? <grin>


I know it is sacrilage not to have them with pate but errrr...eh..I did not have any at the time :unsure: .


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#73 J Acord

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 09:22 AM

J Acord and I have discussed the possiblity of using the enzyme discussed in this thread to create some interesting geometric forms, without too much difficulty.

Meat Glue



Indeed, meat glue would simplify the whole process greatly - but welded meat may not have the same mouthfeel as a terrine :wink:

Edited by J Acord, 20 April 2005 - 09:23 AM.


#74 SethG

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 09:37 AM

Last night I was channel surfing through my DirecTV stations and I happened on a program on the Discovery Home channel called Great Chefs of the World. This particular show featured a stunning terrine of summer vegetables and guinea fowl, served in colorful layered slices, with some kind of tomato-based sauce and vegetable chips as a garnish. The show airs twice more today (follow the above link) if anyone wants to catch it. I wish I'd set my VCR to record-- I wouldn't mind tryng that one out! It doesn't seem the recipe is on-line.

EDIT: No, wait, I found it! Terrine of Summer Vegetables and Guinea Fowl.

Edited by SethG, 20 April 2005 - 09:57 AM.

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#75 bleudauvergne

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 10:55 AM

Looks like an interesting recette. Who's going to try it first? :smile:

A guinea fowl is a pintade, I think.

#76 MichBill

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 12:51 PM

I'm surprised with cookbooks on every topic you can think of there aren't any new updated ones on terrines & pates. They also would have been perfect for the low carb craze. I would love to see a cookbook that focuses on the beauty of them with fresh, bright colored vegetable ones where the design is also important when you cut slices, and see the patterns and colors. Ones that would be uncomplicated and easy to make with seasonal ingredients. Actually they could be the perfect one dish meal with meat and veggies combined. I think it's the complexity of the traditional ones that have kept these from everyday fare. Any cookbook authors here want to give it a shot?

View Post

I know that Brian Polcyn (a chef/owner of Five Lakes Grill in Milford, MI) who serves terrines almost every night in his restaurant and teaches charcuterie at a culinary school (Schoolcraft College) is writing a book on charcuterie with Michael Ruhlman. The last I heard it will be published this fall. I have taken some classes with him and he is a very good teacher. Based upon his knowledge and Michael Ruhlman's previous cook books, I'm predicting that it will be a very good.

#77 bleudauvergne

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 01:08 PM

We could not wait any longer.

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:smile:

#78 FoodMan

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 01:51 PM

Lucy, this looks perfect and delicious. So, how was it? details please. I like how nice the "round" looks in the center.

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#79 SethG

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 02:00 PM

Beautiful! Wow.
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#80 bleudauvergne

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 02:07 PM

Well, it did not turn out too salty, despite my fears. Now I have to remember all the places I added salt. The herbs were really wonderful, and although the sage is just fabulous, I am also imagining that this same terrine with fresh spring shoots of thyme could possibly take this terrine to sublimity. Sometimes my imagination runs wild, however. I had been a bit discouraged because the initial marinade did not smell as alluring as I thought it should. I used an alsacian wine (its what we had in the fridge) when I was thinking a macon would have been better. But once the thing was together it was the addition of the cognac that really got me excited. It stayed together well in serving although I think I was not patient enough with the weighing down bit and could have gotten it a bit more compact. When I served it, Loic said it was good a few times. He kept repeating himself. This recipe is a keeper. I will remember the salt and put it in the gullet.

#81 Carolyn Tillie

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 02:56 PM

Lucy, that is stunning... and I am so proud that YOU have cornichons.

Okay, I've been sick with the flu for a week or so and am finally feeling better. However, lying on my couch, watching movies, and sipping tea, I have been reading my much-beloved terrine book and am hoping to feel better enough this weekend to make one myself. Hoping to post pictures within a week or so!

#82 FoodMan

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Posted 20 April 2005 - 03:03 PM

Lucy, that is stunning... and I am so proud that YOU have cornichons.

Okay, I've been sick with the flu for a week or so and am finally feeling better. However, lying on my couch, watching movies, and sipping tea, I have been reading my much-beloved terrine book and am hoping to feel better enough this weekend to make one myself. Hoping to post pictures within a week or so!

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Looking forward to seeing your terrine, and DON'T forget the little sour pickled cucumbers...what are they called again....

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#83 MobyP

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 12:14 AM

I was just trying to find details on this book. It is one of the best I have seen on the subject. The funny think is that I also have my eye on the stuffed boars head. I even have access to the boar. Now all I have to do is get a different set of less squeamish friends then I can do it....

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If I could get you further South, we're less squeamish down these parts. I would love to help you with that boar's head (plus I have the book).
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#84 bleudauvergne

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 12:23 AM

Lucy, that is stunning... and I am so proud that YOU have cornichons.

Okay, I've been sick with the flu for a week or so and am finally feeling better. However, lying on my couch, watching movies, and sipping tea, I have been reading my much-beloved terrine book and am hoping to feel better enough this weekend to make one myself. Hoping to post pictures within a week or so!

View Post


Looking forward to seeing your terrine, and DON'T forget the little sour pickled cucumbers...what are they called again....

View Post


Can't wait to see Carolyn's terrine! I have a pile of terrine material and books with pages marked on the bedside table. This kind of recipe is very interesting to study.

I went into the kitchen this morning with the thought of taking another slice to work for lunch. It looks like in the night a goblin came and took an obscenely large slice and gobbled it in secret, and there's less than half of my terrine left. :angry: I had to wrap it in goblin proof paper and mark with the magic words : DO NOT TOUCH in order to be sure to have enough to serve at least a taste to my dinner guests tomorrow. :raz:

I like this idea of soaking vegetables in the cooking juice of poultry to which gelatin has been added for the vegetable and poultry terrine. I suppose this would work well with a pied de veau (veal foot) added to the broth as well. That is what I am going to try.

On the way to work I stopped off at the traiteur and looked at their terrines for the longest time.


I'm surprised with cookbooks on every topic you can think of there aren't any new updated ones on terrines & pates. They also would have been perfect for the low carb craze. I would love to see a cookbook that focuses on the beauty of them with fresh, bright colored vegetable ones where the design is also important when you cut slices, and see the patterns and colors. Ones that would be uncomplicated and easy to make with seasonal ingredients. Actually they could be the perfect one dish meal with meat and veggies combined. I think it's the complexity of the traditional ones that have kept these from everyday fare. Any cookbook authors here want to give it a shot?


I know that Brian Polcyn (a chef/owner of Five Lakes Grill in Milford, MI) who serves terrines almost every night in his restaurant and teaches charcuterie at a culinary school (Schoolcraft College) is writing a book on charcuterie with Michael Ruhlman. The last I heard it will be published this fall. I have taken some classes with him and he is a very good teacher. Based upon his knowledge and Michael Ruhlman's previous cook books, I'm predicting that it will be a very good.


That's great news to hear! What will be the name of the book? Can it be pre-ordered? :smile:

#85 SethG

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 07:00 AM

I'm surprised with cookbooks on every topic you can think of there aren't any new updated ones on terrines & pates. They also would have been perfect for the low carb craze. I would love to see a cookbook that focuses on the beauty of them with fresh, bright colored vegetable ones where the design is also important when you cut slices, and see the patterns and colors. Ones that would be uncomplicated and easy to make with seasonal ingredients. Actually they could be the perfect one dish meal with meat and veggies combined. I think it's the complexity of the traditional ones that have kept these from everyday fare. Any cookbook authors here want to give it a shot?

View Post

I know that Brian Polcyn (a chef/owner of Five Lakes Grill in Milford, MI) who serves terrines almost every night in his restaurant and teaches charcuterie at a culinary school (Schoolcraft College) is writing a book on charcuterie with Michael Ruhlman. The last I heard it will be published this fall. I have taken some classes with him and he is a very good teacher. Based upon his knowledge and Michael Ruhlman's previous cook books, I'm predicting that it will be a very good.

View Post


I think that the reason there are few recent books on the subject in English is that publishers don't think there's a lot of interest.

Ruhlman posted about his forthcoming charcuterie book just the other day:

I love the specialty of charcuterie and so am finishing that book now, a love song to a great culinary craft, to salt, to animal fat, to the pig. It should be no surprise that I couldn’t lease a car from the advance I and my friend Brian Polcyn received for it from Norton. Indeed it was really hard to sell—and I’m no longer a stranger in this world; we only sold it because there was an editor out there as lunatic as we were.


If it was hard for such an established writer as Ruhlman to sell such a book, I imagine it must be pretty much impossible for anybody else.

Edited by SethG, 21 April 2005 - 07:01 AM.

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but we like hot butter on our breakfast toast!"

#86 bleudauvergne

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 08:19 AM

The book will most certainly be sold to me without question!! :laugh:

#87 bleudauvergne

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 08:27 AM

J Acord and I have discussed the possiblity of using the enzyme discussed in this thread to create some interesting geometric forms, without too much difficulty.

Meat Glue



Indeed, meat glue would simplify the whole process greatly - but welded meat may not have the same mouthfeel as a terrine :wink:

View Post


I actually think that the meat glue you're talking about is aleady used in the industrial terrines we find at the grocery store, this is a pretty common ingredient in factory made sausages and terrines.

#88 Richard Kilgore

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 08:50 AM

Wow! Lucy, that is beautiful.

And thanks for starting this thread. I have yet to do my first terrine. I was inspired by a previous thread to get an LC mold and a couple of books. Now here I am inspired again.

#89 Adam Balic

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Posted 21 April 2005 - 09:42 AM

J Acord and I have discussed the possiblity of using the enzyme discussed in this thread to create some interesting geometric forms, without too much difficulty.

Meat Glue



Indeed, meat glue would simplify the whole process greatly - but welded meat may not have the same mouthfeel as a terrine :wink:

View Post


I actually think that the meat glue you're talking about is aleady used in the industrial terrines we find at the grocery store, this is a pretty common ingredient in factory made sausages and terrines.

View Post


Yes, I'm sure that it is used in all sorts of industrial stuff (those sliced meats that have clown faces comes to mind). But, it has some interesting potential and it is just a protein solution after all. But, I will do some tradiional stuff first. End of next week.

Your terrine looks great BTW, really nice and I can taste the combination of prune and rabbit in my head, Yum!

#90 bleudauvergne

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Posted 22 April 2005 - 12:49 AM

Actually it's ripe black olives. I have never combined sugary and salty in a terrine, except once when I prepared a fois gras terrine using maple syrup and star anise. It turned out really well. Using fruit with the meats is an idea I should try. I sometimes stuff meats with apricots, prunes, and dates, which have themselves been stuffed with fois gras, so the idea of putting dried fruit in the terrine would just be a continuation of that idea.