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Uses of herbs in cooking


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#1 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:18 AM

How do you use herbs in cooking?

 

What foods go particularly well with each herb?

 

Not all herbs are easily available to me. There would normally be mint, coriander, basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, dill, parsley, sage, chives, tarragon and bay at the supermarket where I shop. What others are worth having/growing? Chervil? Savoury? Borage? Lovage? Sorrel?

 

All herb insights welcome.



#2 huiray

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:22 AM

Are you asking about strictly fresh herbs and/or herbs used in Western/European cuisine; or are dried/fresh herbs from diverse cuisines included?



#3 Porthos

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:37 AM

You might take a look at this link for ideas: http://adventuresins.../flavormap.html

 

I mostly use dried but for a few very specific dishes I only use fresh.


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#4 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:39 AM

Are you asking about strictly fresh herbs and/or herbs used in Western/European cuisine; or are dried/fresh herbs from diverse cuisines included?

 

All herbs, in all their forms!



#5 huiray

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:44 AM

 

Are you asking about strictly fresh herbs and/or herbs used in Western/European cuisine; or are dried/fresh herbs from diverse cuisines included?

 

All herbs, in all their forms!

 

 

Well, here's one example of the use of certain herbs in the E/SE Asian tradition for one particular dish - more FYI (if you haven't already seen this) as I suspect you would either have little occasion to use them or have difficulty getting them if you wished to try them: http://forums.egulle...00#entry1954300

 

However, one can buy prepackaged mixes of the relevant (and more!) herbs in pouches from large/well-stocked Chinese/"Asian" markets/groceries, rather than the individual herbs (and spices) if one wished to attempt this dish... ;-)



#6 jayt90

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 09:59 AM

How do you use herbs in cooking?

 

What foods go particularly well with each herb?

 

Not all herbs are easily available to me. There would normally be mint, coriander, basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, dill, parsley, sage, chives, tarragon and bay at the supermarket where I shop. What others are worth having/growing? Chervil? Savoury? Borage? Lovage? Sorrel?

 

All herb insights  of Italian herbs from Costco.

Savory,basil, thyme, elcome.

I grow most of mine, mostly for French or Italian recipes.

 In winter, I buy dried Greek oregano, bay leaves, and an Italian seasoning from Costco.

Winter window containers support basil, rosemary, thyme, parsley and chives. In January these really come alive.

 

I grow all on your list except bay and lovage. The latter is much like celery, and I substitute celery heart as needed.

I'm not fond of borage, with a cucumber taste, but the flowers are abundant and pretty, and bees are attracted.

 

If you attempt to grow tarragon, buy a French tarragon plant.  

Russian tarragon grows well from seed but has no flavor.

 

I am going to grow two rows of fennel so I can harvest some fennel pollen this year.

Lavender should be on your list if you want to mix up herbes de Provence. Chervil, too.

 

If you grow mint, use a container, or it will spread wildly in the garden.

 

Sorrel and tarragon grow best in spring or fall; summer is rough on them.

 

Fresh thyme is very tender and perfumed when it is growing well. More mature thyme is stronger and woody.

 

Horseradish is another possibility. I tried wasabi once but it died when transplanted. Otherwise most herbs and plants here are easy to grow in good soil with lots of light.


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#7 Hassouni

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 10:45 AM

How do you use herbs in cooking?

 

What foods go particularly well with each herb?

 

Not all herbs are easily available to me. There would normally be mint, coriander, basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, dill, parsley, sage, chives, tarragon and bay at the supermarket where I shop. What others are worth having/growing? Chervil? Savoury? Borage? Lovage? Sorrel?

 

All herb insights welcome.

 

I think the ones easily available that you listed would cover pretty much any application of Western or Middle eastern cooking. If you're into Indian or Persian, then some dried fenugreek is useful. 

 

I regularly use rosemary, thyme, bay, basil, parsley and oregano in cooking, with mint, coriander, tarragon, and dill usually consumed fresh. Thyme, rosemary, and basil (not to mention mint) are dead easy to grow and very convenient to have on hand.

 

As for East/SE Asian, there's a wide variety not normally carried at Western shops. I can't remember where in London you are, but certainly the larger supermarkets in Chinatown carry a pretty good array of stuff.



#8 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 11:17 AM

I grow most of mine as well, and I cook Canadian, Ecuadorian, and world fusion styles.  Everything on your list is in my cupboard as dried herbs (coriander for me is in seed - its fresh counterpart, cilantro, is one of the few herbs I buy) and most of it is also in my garden as fresh.  I also grow lemongrass, limes (for their leaves as well as their fruits), toronjíl (Melissa officianale), and sanguarachi (Amaranthus cruentus) - these ones, apart perhaps from the toronjíl, won't be easy for you to find or grow in North America, but if you're thinking of getting into Latin American cooking they're important.

 

I don't know quite where you are; it may be feasible to grow a small bay laurel in a pot if you're south of, say, Kansas, but in northern climes they don't do all that well indoors.  I've got one outside, but I live in the tropics, so caveat lector…  Fresh bay leaves are miles different from dried ones.

 

Savoury is absolutely worth growing, and if you're going to get into French cooking chervil is indispensable (it's one of the seven Fines Herbes).  I second the recommendation to grow French rather than Russian tarragon.


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#9 KennethT

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 02:59 PM

I grow most of mine as well, and I cook Canadian, Ecuadorian, and world fusion styles.  Everything on your list is in my cupboard as dried herbs (coriander for me is in seed - its fresh counterpart, cilantro, is one of the few herbs I buy) and most of it is also in my garden as fresh.  I also grow lemongrass, limes (for their leaves as well as their fruits), toronjíl (Melissa officianale), and sanguarachi (Amaranthus cruentus) - these ones, apart perhaps from the toronjíl, won't be easy for you to find or grow in North America, but if you're thinking of getting into Latin American cooking they're important.
 
I don't know quite where you are; it may be feasible to grow a small bay laurel in a pot if you're south of, say, Kansas, but in northern climes they don't do all that well indoors.  I've got one outside, but I live in the tropics, so caveat lector…  Fresh bay leaves are miles different from dried ones.
 
Savoury is absolutely worth growing, and if you're going to get into French cooking chervil is indispensable (it's one of the seven Fines Herbes).  I second the recommendation to grow French rather than Russian tarragon.

Do you use regular (bearss) lime leaves, or is it a different variety like a key lime or kaffir? I have a bearss lime tree, and I've always noticed such a nice lime smell from the leaves when I prune it - but have never used them for anything... should I start? What do you do with them?

#10 thatchairlady

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 03:55 PM

I learned kitchen/cooking basics from my Grandmother.  Don't even have to THINK to put together her veggie, navy bean or split pea soup "recipes"... pretty much DUMP recipes.  She always said a bay leaf (or 2) was ABSOLUTELY required... so you added them.  Had NO idea they even had a flavor until I bought my own after getting married??  God only knows how OLD hers were, but they NEVER had the flavor or even ones that came in jar off supermarket shelf.



#11 Panaderia Canadiense

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 04:18 PM

 

I grow most of mine as well, and I cook Canadian, Ecuadorian, and world fusion styles.  Everything on your list is in my cupboard as dried herbs (coriander for me is in seed - its fresh counterpart, cilantro, is one of the few herbs I buy) and most of it is also in my garden as fresh.  I also grow lemongrass, limes (for their leaves as well as their fruits), toronjíl (Melissa officianale), and sanguarachi (Amaranthus cruentus) - these ones, apart perhaps from the toronjíl, won't be easy for you to find or grow in North America, but if you're thinking of getting into Latin American cooking they're important.
 
I don't know quite where you are; it may be feasible to grow a small bay laurel in a pot if you're south of, say, Kansas, but in northern climes they don't do all that well indoors.  I've got one outside, but I live in the tropics, so caveat lector…  Fresh bay leaves are miles different from dried ones.
 
Savoury is absolutely worth growing, and if you're going to get into French cooking chervil is indispensable (it's one of the seven Fines Herbes).  I second the recommendation to grow French rather than Russian tarragon.

Do you use regular (bearss) lime leaves, or is it a different variety like a key lime or kaffir? I have a bearss lime tree, and I've always noticed such a nice lime smell from the leaves when I prune it - but have never used them for anything... should I start? What do you do with them?

 

 

I have Bearss, Key, and Limón Sutíl (which is similar to Bearss but much smaller, stronger, and sweeter).  I use the leaves in curries, some secos (a type of stew common in Latin America - they add a lovely, slightly sweet citric note to seco de chivo, a kid goat stew, without souring the gravy at all.)  Basically, I'd use them wherever I want a citrus flavour without added sourness or bitterness that I might get from using zest or juice.

 

I have also been known to chew the leaves as a pick-me-up.  The flavour is quite nice, although the texture is a bit papery unless they're very young leaves.


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#12 djyee100

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Posted 27 February 2014 - 08:16 PM

I notice you don't have marjoram on your list. That's a mellower version of oregano, and handy to have around in fresh or dried form. (For the carnivores out there, it goes great with grilled lamb.)

 

I'd recommend savory if you cook beans often. That's a classic pairing. For a citrus flavor, consider dried lemon/orange peel in your cupboard, or dried lemongrass. Sorrel is also a lemony green that can go raw into a salad, or cooked in a cream sauce. One EGulleter, on another forum, said he grew sorrel indoors in a pot by his kitchen window. Also think about fennel seed, fresh or dried ginger root, and mustard seeds or dry mustard to perk up food. For exotics, there are Spanish paprika (which I like way better than Hungarian paprika) and the different kinds of pepper (e.g., Aleppo pepper, green peppercorns). Wait...have I crossed into spices??

 

If you buy dried  lavender, make sure it's a culinary lavender. Lavandula xintermedia "Provence" lavender is commonly sold as an herb and it's suitable for cooking. The other Lavandula xintermedia cultivars, such as "Grosso," have a strong camphor flavor and they're better for oils or potpourri. Lavandula stoechas cultivars (aka "rabbit ear" lavenders) are generally not suitable for cooking--they're bitter. The Lavandula angustifolia varieties are known for a sweet taste and recommended for cooking. I don't think Lavandula angustifolia is sold as widely as the more prolific Lavandula xintermedia "Provence" lavender, but you might be able to find it in a specialty herb store.

 

One tip from a chef that I found handy--if you buy a fresh bunch of herbs, like oregano, and you don't use it all, lay it on a plate on your kitchen counter. Use it up as it dries. It's fine if it's only semi-dry, and when fully dry, it's fresher than the dry herbs you usually buy at the store.


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#13 huiray

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:33 AM

I often use basil like a vegetable, particularly the "standard" Italian-type basil or Genovese basil, both of which I also grow in season.  Ditto Thai-type or Vietnamese-type basil (húng quế).  I use them (suitably trimmed) in soups and stir-fries, in vegetable-sized portions - fistfuls of them, leaves-on-tender-stems and flowers and all.  I also grow at least two varieties of Thai/Vietnamese basil each year.  I frequently buy big bunches of all of them as well.  I sometimes also grow Holy Basil, Purple basil, etc as well.  I used to grow up to a dozen varieties but I gave that up some years ago. 

 

On my part I am very reluctant to buy (Western-type) basil, the "usual variety", at Western supermarkets in my area.  It's exorbitant in price.  So, out of season, I get fresh (Western) basil from those places only if I have to.  In season it would come from my own plants or from the Farmers' Markets by the bunchful.  Thai/Vietnamese basil is a different story - even in the dead of winter I will get the stuff from my local Chinese grocery or the International market.  Previously I got it from the grocery half of a Vietnamese restaurant-cum-grocery, 1-2 pounds at a clip (after asking the proprietess); they got their stuff from Texas.  I think my current Chinese grocery gets it from California.  Or, from the Vietnamese groceries in Chicago (usually around Argyle Street) when I am there.  During spring-summer-fall I also have my own plants.

 

One thing that dried basil is nice in is rice, I find.  Just add some (I am generous with the quantity) to the pot when making rice (in the "usual" manner) scattered on top of the water, with or without a bit of salt and/or oil if desired - I usually add just the dried basil.  Makes for a nice change.

 

The "Western-type" herbs I commonly use and grow (other than basil, already mentioned) would include:

• Thyme (typically 'English', 'French', 'Lemon', 'Silver'...) as fresh thyme or dried (out of season, or just for the hell of it) - in stews, sautés, braises, whatever.

• Rosemary (I currently have a fairly large standard overwintering in my breezeway :-) ), 'Logee Blue' if I can get it.

• Parsley (Italian) - I grow it in season, buy it at other times and as needed; used in the "normal way" generally; or in special dishes like this one (scroll down) where I use lots of it.  Sometimes I'll use it almost like a vegetable - e.g. a fistful or two tossed into chicken broth to wilt and simmer for just a minute or so, then eaten together w/ the soup.

• Sage (Common type) - this one is very hardy and survives the winters outside most of the time.  Used once in a while, usually in pork-type dishes.

•Tarragon (French) - this also usually survives outside (but this winter has been very bad...we'll see if it comes back this year).  Used in some omelettes, egg dishes, in sautés w/ chicken especially (e.g. chicken w/ mustard & tarragon) &etc.

• Oregano (indeterminate variety; typical "Garden Center" stuff, probably a Greek-derived/Mediterranean cultivar; but NOT Turkish or Russian, which are visibly distinguishable varieties and which I dislike) - also winter-hardy most of the time.  I would consider Russian Oregano to be definitely an ornamental. :-)  (I've grown it)   I also use the dried stuff; while I get dried "Mexican oregano" (actually  Lippia graveolens) from the Supermercado here.  Used in typical manner - stews, braises, meat sauces for Italian-American pasta dishes, etc.  I rarely use (or grow) marjoram.

 

I also often have a pot or two of Vietnamese coriander (rau răm) a.k.a. Laksa leaves &etc during the growing season, but not always. (indoors/overwintering - they get very leggy) Those go into, yes, laksa-type or curry-type dishes, or get used as a veggie in stir-fries also.  (See: Persicaria odorata)   I also buy this on occasion.

 

The most commonly used herbs for me would be scallions/green onions and coriander leaf/cilantro, both of which I buy - usually from the local Chinese/"Asian" grocery, rarely from the Western supermarkets (big cost difference). Used in all sorts of ways, ranging from being components of the dishes (typically E/SE Asian cuisines) to garnishes for the dishes.  Occasionally I'll get Japanese-type (negi) or large-type Chinese "scallions" (大蔥).  

 

Sometimes I'll get Chinese chives (韭菜; Allium tuberosum; garlic chives) or garlic chive flowerbuds (韭菜花) (they are bundled/sold separately) - for use in various soups, braises, stir-fries, omelettes, etc.  Once in a while I'll pick up some yellow Chinese chives.  Uses - same as for the green type, but these have a more delicate flavor.  I guess these would also be used on a "vegetable scale" frequently.  I can't remember the last time I picked up Western chives for home use, although I've eaten it incorporated in various dishes in Western restaurants, of course. 

 

On occasion I will get some mint (usually spearmint or similar; sometimes applemint; for salads, some SE Asian/Vietnamese dishes, etc), or rarely things like culantro (ngò gai'; Mexican coriander; Eryngium foetidum) when I make Phở, for example.  I also sometimes buy lemongrass for some Thai/Vietnamese/Malaysian dishes.  My Mint Juleps I'll leave to bartenders hither and yon.  My Gawd, I remember the mint juleps I had (with my companion) in Savannah, GA on the eve of a hurricane, in a bar on the riverfront deserted except for the two of us and the bartender who grew his own mint in his backyard. :-) 

 

I do also have perilla (Vietnamese varietytía tô) growing outside in season - in fact, the damn thing is all over the place (it seeds itself with wild abandon into every nook and cranny and even into the lawn!!) but I actually rarely use it and in the last couple of years have been pulling up wayward plants of it by the bushel, it almost seems, and tossing them - but I'll give them to a local shop this year...)

 

ETA: Oh, I forgot - Bay leaves, of course.  Laurus nobilis in particular.  I do not use California bay or Indian Bay.  I've had bay trees (standards) or bushes over the years and have tended to lose them to the Big Garden In The Sky - because overwintering them indoors somehow seems to be hard to do in my hands.  They're also big scale magnets.  I usually buy and use them as dried leaves nowadays - in all sorts of soups/stews/braises.  I also used to grow Murraya koenigii (கருவேப்பிலை; "curry leaves") but usually buy them (fresh, of course) from Indian groceries nowadays. I use them in Southern Indian style curries.

 

I have (and use) various dried Chinese herbs such as the ones I listed in the post on (a recent batch of) Bak Kut Teh that I linked to in my previous post above.  They usually go into soups.


Edited by huiray, 28 February 2014 - 01:25 PM.

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#14 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 01:12 PM

Hi Plantes Vertes,

 

Here is more input for you.

 

I grow and use regularly:

Mint - anything from cocktails to rubs for lamb. Very easy to grow.

Chives - mostly in salads, garnish for certain dishes. Also very easy to grow.

Thyme - indispensable in French cuisine (bouquet garni).

Rosemary - for things like stews. Easy to grow but I just killed mine after 2 weeks without water (everything else survived).

French sorrel - in French cooking we don't use it as an herb, but rather treat it as a leafy vegetable that you have to cook. I use it in soups and with fish.

French tarragon - not indispensable but easy to grow and excellent in salads and pickles (cornichons).

Summer savory - my plant died, but it was good for a fish dish that I like. Also I just love the flavor (it brings me back to summers in Corsica). I can't find it in stores here so I have to grow it.

Lavender - super easy to grow. I use it to infuse creme brulee. I don't use it much in cooking but it looks nice and is practically indestructible.

Borage - I had it last year, but to be honest, other than the fact that the blue flowers make a beautiful garnish, and that the leaves are used in Pimm's cups, it's not that essential.

Chervil - I did that last year too. Very pretty and delicate flavor. But a little high maintenance for me.

 

I buy regularly (fresh):

Parsley - I use way too much to be able to grow enough. From bouquet garni to salads, garnishing dishes, etc. It's the herb I use the most often.

Basil (in summer) - I will buy a plant or two in the summer, but always end up needing WAY more than what the plant can produce (also bugs love basil). I use it in salads, or for pesto.

Cilantro - I tried growing it once but my yield was very small and it went to seed very fast. It's used a lot in Mexican dishes that we eat regularly in San Diego. Also jerk sauce in the summer.

Bay leaves - easy to grow but I don't want to dedicate the space. Used in bouquet garni. I buy them fresh when I can find them, otherwise I always have dried leaves in the pantry.

 

Less frequently (fresh)

Marjoram, oregano - mostly for certain Italian dishes.

Dill - for gravlax.

Sage - for sage and brown butter sauce. When I go on hikes I just pick some. Sage grows wild everywhere around here.

 

I don't use a lot of dried herbs because they don't have much flavor. I have oregano that I use rarely, bay leaves. I think that's it.

 

More ideas

Nasturtium is very popular around here for the flowers, but you can use them in salads and it's super easy to grow. The seedpods can be pickled to make something similar to capers.

I would like to buy another variety of mint (I bought a mojito mint but it died).

Artemisia/wormwood if I can find it at my local nursery - for cocktail bitters.

Hops (not an herb, I know) - they make huge vines but I would be curious to grow one for fun.

 

You mention lovage - do you know what it is used for? I think I have seen it at my local nursery. I am just curious.


Edited by FrogPrincesse, 28 February 2014 - 01:24 PM.

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#15 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:15 PM

 

How do you use herbs in cooking?

 

What foods go particularly well with each herb?

 

Not all herbs are easily available to me. There would normally be mint, coriander, basil, oregano, rosemary, thyme, dill, parsley, sage, chives, tarragon and bay at the supermarket where I shop. What others are worth having/growing? Chervil? Savoury? Borage? Lovage? Sorrel?

 

All herb insights  of Italian herbs from Costco.

Savory,basil, thyme, elcome.

I grow most of mine, mostly for French or Italian recipes.

 In winter, I buy dried Greek oregano, bay leaves, and an Italian seasoning from Costco.

Winter window containers support basil, rosemary, thyme, parsley and chives. In January these really come alive.

 

I grow all on your list except bay and lovage. The latter is much like celery, and I substitute celery heart as needed.

I'm not fond of borage, with a cucumber taste, but the flowers are abundant and pretty, and bees are attracted.

 

If you attempt to grow tarragon, buy a French tarragon plant.  

Russian tarragon grows well from seed but has no flavor.

 

I am going to grow two rows of fennel so I can harvest some fennel pollen this year.

Lavender should be on your list if you want to mix up herbes de Provence. Chervil, too.

 

If you grow mint, use a container, or it will spread wildly in the garden.

 

Sorrel and tarragon grow best in spring or fall; summer is rough on them.

 

Fresh thyme is very tender and perfumed when it is growing well. More mature thyme is stronger and woody.

 

Horseradish is another possibility. I tried wasabi once but it died when transplanted. Otherwise most herbs and plants here are easy to grow in good soil with lots of light.

 

 

jayt90, what is fennel pollen like, and what do you use it for? I've seen it in a health-food shop but never tried it.



#16 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:30 PM

huiray - I don't know if I've ever seen perilla. What's it normally used for, and why don't you like it?



#17 heidih

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:42 PM

You mention lovage - do you know what it is used for? I think I have seen it at my local nursery. I am just curious.


It has a celery like taste and aroma. The stem is fairly thick and hollow. We market the plant as "Bloody Mary plant" noting that the stems can be used as the straw in the cocktail.

#18 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:45 PM

FrogPrincesse, thanks for all the great info! I found this about lovage. It actually sounds quite useful.


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#19 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 02:47 PM

You mention lovage - do you know what it is used for? I think I have seen it at my local nursery. I am just curious.

It has a celery like taste and aroma. The stem is fairly thick and hollow. We market the plant as "Bloody Mary plant" noting that the stems can be used as the straw in the cocktail.
Thanks Heidi. Not an herb I am familiar with.

#20 huiray

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:10 PM

huiray - I don't know if I've ever seen perilla. What's it normally used for, and why don't you like it?

 

Look here and here for examples of pictures of what I have in my garden/on my deck. The leaves on the biggest plants that come up and that I allow to grow can be pretty big.  This is the Vietnamese variety, not the Japanese one (shiso), which is either all green or all purple. Vietnamese perilla is often used in rice noodle dishes/noodle-soup dishes; braises, stews, etc - as a garnish, mostly.  Japanese shiso is used in a similar manner and as a garnish on sashimi/sushi plates quite frequently.  It's not that I really dislike it (or hate it) but it's just that I seldom make dishes that call for its use, or when I do just don't end up using it because it would not be the most urgent taste for me to incorporate (for my taste), true.  I planted the first ones some years ago just for the hell of it and discovered that it was the gift that kept on giving. :-) 



#21 heidih

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:23 PM

huiray - I don't know if I've ever seen perilla. What's it normally used for, and why don't you like it?

 
Look here and here for examples of pictures of what I have in my garden/on my deck. The leaves on the biggest plants that come up and that I allow to grow can be pretty big.  This is the Vietnamese variety, not the Japanese one (shiso), which is either all green or all purple. Vietnamese perilla is often used in rice noodle dishes/noodle-soup dishes; braises, stews, etc - as a garnish, mostly.  Japanese shiso is used in a similar manner and as a garnish on sashimi/sushi plates quite frequently.  It's not that I really dislike it (or hate it) but it's just that I seldom make dishes that call for its use, or when I do just don't end up using it because it would not be the most urgent taste for me to incorporate (for my taste), true.  I planted the first ones some years ago just for the hell of it and discovered that it was the gift that kept on giving. :-)


Also lovely as part of the greenery wrap for Korean ssam https://www.google.c...ih=497&dpr=1.25 You can see the saw tooth edged leaves in some of the google images

Edited by heidih, 28 February 2014 - 05:25 PM.


#22 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:34 PM

FrogPrincesse, thanks for all the great info! I found this about lovage. It actually sounds quite useful.


Thanks PV. I am intrigued now!

#23 DiggingDogFarm

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:41 PM

Fresh lovage tastes, to me, like a mixture of strong celery and walnuts.....I often think of Waldorf salad when sampling a leaf. 

It's incredibly easy to grow and a perennial....the seed heads shoot to about 8 feet tall here.


~Martin
 
Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist and contrarian who questions everything!
 


#24 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 05:47 PM

Lovage is a common herb in many recipes of classical western cuisine.  By "classical" I mean Roman.  See Dalby and Grainger, The Classical Cookbook.  I have never found lovage for sale, unfortunately.

 

The herbs I grow are rosemary, basil, and lavender.  I had a mint plant but I was able to kill it.  Sure wish I had some mint right now.



#25 Plantes Vertes

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 06:20 PM

FrogPrincesse, thanks for all the great info! I found this about lovage. It actually sounds quite useful.

 

And Hugh Fearnley-Wittingstall has also made posts on cooking with sage, rosemary and bay.


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#26 FrogPrincesse

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Posted 28 February 2014 - 08:34 PM

I checked my pantry and also have a huge bag of herbes de Provence that I brought from France... I can't believe I forgot. I could not survive without them. I use them on grilled foods mostly, but other stuff too - I just added some to the lentils I am cooking now. The mix I have contains rosemary, thyme, basil, and marjoram. I've seen mixes in the US that include lavender but that just seems odd to me.

Edited by FrogPrincesse, 28 February 2014 - 08:40 PM.


#27 patrickamory

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 06:51 PM

Another vote for summery savory - an incredibly versatile and delicious herb, definitely not just for beans.



#28 Franci

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 08:52 PM

Ok, it's not an herb strictly but I'd like to include capers,they are very dear to me, they remind my of " home". Not those terrible capers from supermarkets, the real ones, if you ever had a chance of trying.
I use them in tomato salad, in the stuffing for vegetables and mixed roasted summer vegetables, with fish.

#29 patrickamory

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 08:59 PM

By real ones Franci do you mean the ones packed in salt? Or particular brands? Curious for recommendations.



#30 Franci

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Posted 02 March 2014 - 09:29 PM

My grandfather had plants of capers in the garden and use to pick them and cure them with salt but his capers didn't looked dusted with salt, just wet. Now my cousin make capers for everybody in the family, I must ask her how she cures them. The few times I ran out and bought from stores capers under salt I was always amazed at the difference in taste. Last time at Eataly I was temped from the pantelleria capers but then I didn't want to be disappointed and 15$ lighter.