Jump to content


Welcome to the eG Forums!

These forums are a service of the Society for Culinary Arts & Letters, a 501c3 nonprofit organization dedicated to advancement of the culinary arts. Anyone can read the forums, however if you would like to participate in active discussions please join the Society.

Photo

eG Foodblog: CaliPoutine, MarketStEl & mizducky - The Shrinking

Foodblog

  • This topic is locked This topic is locked
304 replies to this topic

#31 Smithy

Smithy
  • host
  • 3,961 posts
  • Location:North Shore of Lake Superior

Posted 07 January 2008 - 02:57 PM

Well. Here's my next question, directed mostly (I suppose) at CaliPoutine, but I'd be interested in the others' take on it as well.

Although I can understand the value of a point system - it's easy, it helps you balance your choices - for changing a diet, I can't imagine using it myself. I swear, you trotted out the points just now and my mind seized up as though it were already tax time. If I were to try something like that, I think its chief benefit would be that the very effort of dealing with it would put me off food. Did you have to do any mental gymnastics or calming exercises to take on the approach of points? Or did it just work for you, right from the get-go?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown


#32 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 03:06 PM

I have to admit, I was a bit hungry at 4pm. I ate a mini bag( half an ounce) of pretzels( bought after Halloween for 50% off). I was still hungry so I ate a grapefruit w/ a touch of agave syrup. My sparkpeople( see, obsessive!!) says with dinner my total calories are 1436. I feel like I might want some dessert after dinner.

Posted Image

Today I was asked to quote a catering job that will take place every Monday in April and May. They're going to base their decision on the menu so now I have to think about food and dessert later tonight/tomorrow while I plan the menu. When I'm seriously dieting, its best that I don't watch foodtv or read any dessert cookbooks. Cake is a serious weakness of mine.

#33 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 03:08 PM

Well.  Here's my next question, directed mostly (I suppose) at CaliPoutine, but I'd be interested in the others' take on it as well.

Although I can understand the value of a point system - it's easy, it helps you balance your choices - for changing a diet, I can't imagine using it myself.  I swear, you trotted out the points just now and my mind seized up as though it were already tax time.  If I were to try something like that, I think its chief benefit would be that the very effort of dealing with it would put me off food.  Did you have to do any mental gymnastics or calming exercises to take on the approach of points?  Or did it just work for you, right from the get-go?

View Post



Nancy, I'm like Abra in that I've done this plan so many times that I can probably tell you the points of something when I'm half asleep. Its something that is just so familar to me that it doesnt bother me at all. What bothers me is the near obsession I develop regarding menu planning and mealtime. I'm already thinking about what I'm going to eat tomorrow and Wednesday when I'm in London around lunchtime.

#34 Dianne

Dianne
  • participating member
  • 197 posts
  • Location:Toronto, On.

Posted 07 January 2008 - 03:56 PM

  What bothers me is the near obsession I develop regarding menu planning and mealtime.  I'm already thinking about what I'm going to eat tomorrow and Wednesday when I'm in London around lunchtime.

View Post


But I am not watching my calories, and I am still obsessed with meal planning and what's for dinner tomorrow: so maybe it is just a foodie thing. :biggrin:

#35 Shelby

Shelby
  • society donor
  • 2,559 posts

Posted 07 January 2008 - 04:04 PM

Stupendous idea for a blog...as a fellow weight-loser (and -gainer, and -loser, etc.), I'm always looking to see what works for other food-focused peeps...

Blog on!
mem

View Post



Me too!

It's hard to be a foodie and maintain, although I try.

I have an elliptical machine that I work out on every day for 30 minutes. I get up at 4:30 every morning to do so. I have to leave for work by 6:30 in the morning and by the time I get home I'm ready for a glass of wine so it's best that I exercise first thing.

I live so far out in the country that I don't have the fast food temptations that some do, however, I love to cook, so that's temptation enough!

Oh, and I give myself one day off a week from the exercise. I usually take it on Fridays for some reason. I find that Wednesdays I'm the most exhausted for some reason. I don't know why. :huh:

#36 Peter the eater

Peter the eater
  • participating member
  • 2,610 posts
  • Location:Halifax, Nova Scotia

Posted 07 January 2008 - 05:52 PM

A great theme for a January foodblog - thank you three for having the courage to share the personal details. Health really is everything, without health it's hard to enjoy just about anything.

It strikes me that gourmandry and weight management are at heart at odds with each other:  I notice that truly svelte people appear to be absent from the ranks of food lovers.  Yet at the same time, I also note that truly obese people are not overrepresented among them either, though we may have a disporportionate share of overweight people like myself.  Perhaps we will figure out why this is so in the course of this blog; perhaps not.


I think you are right. For some, food is merely a necessary part of sustenance - these people are usually thin and don't read foodblogs. Like most folks I have had ups and downs in the weight department. In 2004 when I was 37 my goal before turning 40 was to run a marathon (and to have a baby - I managed two of each) and when I crossed the finish line after four and a half hours of unremarkable running, my BMI (Body Mass Index) was 31. At 6'-1" and 230 lbs, a BMI of over 30 means obese. I neither looked nor felt obese, I felt fantastic for achieving such a goal. Here I am, and here.

My point is . . . a bathroom scale is a tool with very limited utility. Use it when you have to, then give it away . . . preferably to somebody you don't like. And the Body Mass Index is totally useless for a lot of people. I'm proud to be a man of girth and density! :biggrin:

edit to add: I love the name "The Shrinking". Very Stephen King.

Edited by Peter the eater, 07 January 2008 - 05:59 PM.

Peter Gamble aka "Peter the eater"

I just made a cornish game hen with chestnut stuffing. . .
Would you believe a pigeon stuffed with spam? . . .
Would you believe a rat filled with cough drops?

Moe Sizlack

#37 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 05:56 PM

Dinner tonight.

Posted Image

My backsplash is brand new so I think the smudges are from the camera.

Posted Image

Robin asked me if a plantain is a fruit or a veg. Does anyone know? I removed the skin from the chicken.

Posted Image

I felt hungry and deprived after I ate so I had 1/2 cup of bryers triple choc. ice cream. I probably should have waited 10 min for my dinner to digest. I feel full now though.

#38 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 06:18 PM

Wow, a triple-gay blog!  That in itself is very interesting, even if the rest of the topic weren't. 

View Post

Oh yeah--we thought that was a pretty entertaining subtheme too. You should have seen some of our list of working titles for the blog ... I think one of the earliest was something like "Dieting--that's so gay!" :laugh:

(Somewhat) more seriously ... our respective affiliations with the greater LGBT community does have some on-topic implications for the blog. For myself, I know my thinking about body weight was massively (so to speak) influenced by time I spent in the lesbian feminist arm of the fat liberation movement, back in the 1980s. I eventually broke with their radically anti-dieting stance, but I still owe that movement props for unhooking my brain from society's tyranny of slenderness, the social conditioning that compells people to strive for unhealthily model-like thinness at all costs, including personal health.

Well.  Here's my next question, directed mostly (I suppose) at CaliPoutine, but I'd be interested in the others' take on it as well.

Although I can understand the value of a point system - it's easy, it helps you balance your choices - for changing a diet, I can't imagine using it myself.  I swear, you trotted out the points just now and my mind seized up as though it were already tax time.  If I were to try something like that, I think its chief benefit would be that the very effort of dealing with it would put me off food.  Did you have to do any mental gymnastics or calming exercises to take on the approach of points?  Or did it just work for you, right from the get-go?

View Post

Nancy, I'm like Abra in that I've done this plan so many times that I can probably tell you the points of something when I'm half asleep. Its something that is just so familar to me that it doesnt bother me at all. What bothers me is the near obsession I develop regarding menu planning and mealtime. I'm already thinking about what I'm going to eat tomorrow and Wednesday when I'm in London around lunchtime.

View Post

What Randi said--I've done a bazillion different dieting schemes over the years, enough so that I too can look at just about any food item and tell you its calories, fat grams and carb grams per unit. All these systems, whether measuring points or grams or calories, are merely tools, means to an end. If they work for you, good; if not, it's no biggie--just come up with a tracking system that works for you.

The underlying issue, at least for me (and I suspect others) is not about the rules or the food values, it's about remembering to stick to those rules and not give in to the raging Lizard Brain in your head that wants to eat everything that isn't nailed down. Or even better, to mollify the Lizard Brain enough that it's just go to sleep and leave you alone to serenely commune with your healthy meal.

I got a whole bunch of photos to upload, and a light dinner to make for Mr. E, and then a cooking project for myself with which to entertain you all. Back shortly...

(edited to fix tyops :biggrin: )

Edited by mizducky, 07 January 2008 - 06:22 PM.


#39 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 08:28 PM

So, my afternoon's food adventures ... I bid fond farewell to home (and to the neighbor's lime tree hanging over the fence):
Posted Image

...and headed out into the most un-SoCal-like weather (it's been raining like a sonofagun for the past three days):
Posted Image

I finally live in a neighborhood where it is not only possible, but entertaining to go walking, which has been a boon to my lagging exercise routine. More on that anon.

First, my tummy was growling so I needed to tend to that pronto, so I headed here:
Posted Image

I'm still just beginning to explore all the fun things on Golden City's extremely extensive menu. I wanted a vegetable-centric meal, so I ordered the lunch special of "sauteed sliced lily root in pork beancurd sauce":
Posted Image

The lotus root was nice and tender-crunchy. Interesting sauce, with the faintest touch of heat. There was a goodly amount of tender pork strips in there too. Soup, spring roll, and fried wonton strips were included; the latter two items were totally ignorable, but the hot-and-sour soup, while not that spicy, had an impressive amount of veg and shroom content (I love the crunchy texture of the "ear" fungi). Not bad for $6.25 before tax--oh yeah, I'm still a tightwad gourmand. :biggrin:

As I climbed into my car, I noticed for the first time that there was a bakery seconds store tucked in next to Golden City:
Posted Image

So of course I had to check it out:
Posted Image

I bought a couple of things that are more for Mr. E than me ... you'll see them later.

To be continued...

#40 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 08:54 PM

Next stop was my old friend 99 Ranch Market:
Posted Image

... to stock up on two of my favorite ingredients for weight-conscious meals, konnyaku:
Posted Image

... and tofu:
Posted Image

Meanwhile I was casting about for something around which to build my supper, and got inspired by the contents of this chill chest:
Posted Image

Wrapped up there, and went on to Food 4 Less to buy some more mundane items:
Posted Image

The big warehouse-y interior usually, though not always, contains some good food bargains. I buy most of my household's meat and packaged groceries here--but produce only when it's on sale, because otherwise there are much cheaper and better places for fruit and veg (which I'll show you later in the week):
Posted Image

Then homeward with my purchases (to be continued)...

Edited by mizducky, 07 January 2008 - 08:56 PM.


#41 snowangel

snowangel
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 8,140 posts
  • Location:Twin Cities, MN

Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:22 PM

Talk hydration, gang. Water, coffee, tea, diet pop, bottled whatever, alcoholic beverages all in the context of weight loss, body image, working out, etc., etc.
Susan Fahning aka "snowangel"

#42 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:25 PM

So here's my haul from the afternoon's shopping:
Posted Image

In no particular order:
Two types of tofu (firm and baked)
Two types of shirataki (plain and pre-tied into little bundles)
Fig bars*
English muffins*
Minneola tangelos
Bananas
Soybean sprouts
Low-fat granola bars
Boneless skinless chicken breasts
Ground beef, 7% fat
Chinese cooking condiments (shaoxing wine, light soy sauce, hoisin sauce, toban jian)
Dried shiitakes
Plain lowfat yogurt
Plain white mushrooms
Bok choy
Spinach
CHeerios*
Store brand hamburger helper*
Prunes
Sugar-free energy drinks

The asterisked items I buy mainly or totally for Mr. E. The full-on Asian ingredients I buy mainly for me. The energy drinks are a strange obsession I have fallen prey to in recent months--I harbor no delusions about these drinks offering anything beyond a kick-in-the-pants quantity of caffeine, but they're a fun no-harm indulgence.

The secret ingredient to my dinner will be revealed as soon as I upload more photos. In the meantime, let me give you a tour of my "new" kitchen (well, new since I moved in with Mr. E six months ago):
Posted Image

Not a whole lot of counter or storage space. And the counters are that damfool ceramic tile that chips and cracks so easily and collects crud in all the crevices. But glory be, it's an all-gas range! I didn't think those existed in SoCal! :laugh:

These fridge shots were taken Sunday evening--you can see why I needed to do a major grocery reload:
Posted Image

Posted Image

Posted Image

The bagels and lox in the freezer are from a Zabar's care package my brother sent me in December for my birthday. For the sake of my weight management sanity, they went straight into the freezer. :laugh: Yes of course I can defrost them in minutes ... but making them require that little extra effort makes them less attractive as snacking-out-of-bounds magnets.

#43 artisan02

artisan02
  • participating member
  • 231 posts
  • Location:Albuquerque, NM

Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:27 PM

The big warehouse-y interior usually, though not always, contains some good food bargains. I buy most of my household's meat and packaged groceries here--but produce only when it's on sale, because otherwise there are much cheaper and better places for fruit and veg (which I'll show you later in the week):

I will be interested in the fruit and vegetable places, since I might be spending 3 months there, starting in about 3 weeks.

Christine

#44 MarketStEl

MarketStEl
  • participating member
  • 3,722 posts
  • Location:Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:36 PM

Talk hydration, gang.  Water, coffee, tea, diet pop, bottled whatever, alcoholic beverages all in the context of weight loss, body image, working out, etc., etc.

View Post


Coming up, Susan. I'm batch processing the day's pictures now.

There will also be walking and riding involved. It wouldn't be a MarketStEl foodblog without a trip on public transit. I guess I could walk the 30 miles from my Center City home to Bucks County -- it would do wonders for my cardio and take off a chunk of weight -- but I need to sleep sometime. So my walking gets in at the ends of the journey. (What's that? Bike, you say? I haven't gotten up to the stamina level yet where I could negotiate the rather hilly terrain of the Neshaminy Creek valley and Lower Bucks County. And I'd still have to get up an hour and a half earlier at the least.)
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#45 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 09:39 PM

Talk hydration, gang.  Water, coffee, tea, diet pop, bottled whatever, alcoholic beverages all in the context of weight loss, body image, working out, etc., etc.

View Post

Staying properly hydrated IMO is crucial to a weight loss regimen, because it helps your kidneys better process and expell all those metabolic byproducts of your weight loss. However, proper hydration remains one of my biggest personal challenges, mainly because I find plain water boring. I've gone through phases of drinking mass quantities of diet soda and those artificially-sweetened powdered drink mixes, but eventually felt overdosed on that weird chemical-ish sweetness. I've also had mixed results from iced herbal tea--the flavors are just not quite punchy enough, plus I really prefer carbonated beverages. Recently both I and Mr. E have had great success with flavored unsweetened sparkling waters, like the Crystal Geyser stuff carried by the local Trader Joe's. The flavors are interesting and dry, not sweet--and boy are those things ever carbonated!

I do also drink my share of caffeinated and alcoholic beverages, but as both caffeine and alcohol are diuretics, I tend to not count them towards my daily hydration. And juices I tend to count as food, rather than hydration. I really don't go in for those sports drinks and sports waters--the sugared sports drinks I just think of as empty calories, and the sports waters seem overpriced to me. And they're not carbonated. I loves them scrubbing bubbles! :laugh:

Edited by mizducky, 07 January 2008 - 09:42 PM.


#46 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 07 January 2008 - 10:15 PM

I knew that tonight, Mr. E would be out of the house for one of his many support and social groups, so that's my cue to cook things that would weird him out if he were home to see them. :laugh:

But first I had to cook a dinner for him. I made one of his favorites, a simple cheese omelette, using his beloved Cabot white cheddar (he's an old-line Yankee from Vermont, all the way):
Posted Image

Little lettuce-and-mushroom salad on the side; he also had an English muffin with this.

Then he left, and it was time for me to make with the "exotic" cooking ingredients:
Posted Image

There's a couple of meaty little catfish heads in the metal bowl; the shirataki knots are simmering in some leftover broth I'd saved in the fridge from another cooking project. Also into this soup went some sliced bok choy and scallions, a slice of gingerroot, and a glug of Chinese light soy sauce.

Now, isn't this a photo worthy of the "Gallery of Regrettable Foods" anti-dinner topic? :laugh:
Posted Image

If there's any way to make fish head soup look a little more attractive, I'd love to hear about it! But IMO it really is a meal one must either eat alone, or with understanding friends, because boy is it messy to get all the yummy tidbits out of the heads. But the good news--besides the yumminess--is that the net amount of meat isn't all that much--but the size of the heads, and the amount of work you have to put into getting all the meat out, tricks the ol' Lizard Brain into feeling like it had a nice big meal.

#47 MarketStEl

MarketStEl
  • participating member
  • 3,722 posts
  • Location:Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

Posted 07 January 2008 - 11:11 PM

But first I had to cook a dinner for him. I made one of his favorites, a simple cheese omelette, using his beloved Cabot white cheddar (he's an old-line Yankee from Vermont, all the way):
Posted Image

View Post


After trying Tillamook from Oregon, I'm afraid Cabot, good though it is, doesn't quite do it for me like it used to.

But now to the day. Atkins devotees will probably be highly disappointed to see what I ate.

Susan: I do pack my lunch most days. This morning, I assembled my salad as is most often my wont:

Posted Image
Posted Image

and fixed myself a bowl of childhood:

Posted Image

Make that the dregs of a bowl of childhood. I don't think that even Mikey would like this:

Posted Image

Add milk:

Posted Image

and down with juice.

Posted Image

Posted Image

My fridge was as full this morning as Ellen's was empty. The large object in the lower of the two plastic bags on the top shelf was tonight's dinner, which I will probably get around to posting in the early A.M. Tuesday.

One could ask, Why is a confirmed cheesehead drinking lactose free milk? Truth to tell, I probably should be taking Lactaid tablets with my meals, for as the salad above should indicate, I still work cheese into a lot of my dishes, and I think I am somewhat lactose intolerant, as many African-Americans are. Perhaps I should just work less cheese into my dishes.

A cup of coffee would ordinarily materialize here, after I finished the green tea warmup, but both our coffee mills chose this morning to die. (I had a blade grinder I purchased at a used furniture store near me, and I also responded to an e-mail offer of a free burr grinder from a roast-your-own coffee outfit. Regarding the burr grinder, I got what I paid for -- its motor seizes after a few days of grinding coffee.)

You'll have to wait 'til Tuesday for the rest of Monday. It's late, I had problems processing the large batch of pictures, and I need to get some rest. Exercise, such as it is, is among the highlights, along with the commute.
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3

#48 helenjp

helenjp
  • eGullet Society staff emeritus
  • 3,232 posts

Posted 07 January 2008 - 11:46 PM

Oh gosh, question time here! Even without trying to reverse the weight that snuck up on me over a few stressful years, I have a hard time balancing meals for hungry teen boys, underweight husband and overweight me.

Great idea to do a troika - it's interesting to see different approaches.

1)That salad colander - does that maybe go in the fridge with a lid on, and keep salad greens usable for more than one meal? If so, does it work, and how many days will salad greens keep?

2) Lactose intolerance - my Japanese husband (just to differentiate from all the OTHER husbands!) can and does eat a lot of yogurt (whole milk, unsweetened, home-made), a little cheese, and almost never milk.

3) Carbonated drinks. When I was helping out with food and drink for my mother in hospital, the medical staff were adamant that she should not have carbonated diet or sports drinks because of the high sodium content. She flatly refused to drink plain water, and despite a considerable weight problem, staff told me they'd rather she was drinking watered down juice or still drinks than diet sodas. Do any of you diabetics get warnings about diet sodas, or is it a non-issue for people in reasonable health? Here in Japan, I can fortunately drink Japan's single greatest contribution to human culture - mugicha, or roasted barley tea!

4) Does the weightwatcher point system combine easily with the diabetic "food exchange" system?

5) What kind of starches do you find easiest/best for weight loss.

#49 lucylou95816

lucylou95816
  • participating member
  • 435 posts
  • Location:Sacramento, CA-HQ of the Govenator

Posted 07 January 2008 - 11:54 PM

Great start to your weight loss blog..as I know, it isn't easy, and it's great you guys found a way to make it work for you.

Mizducky..are the shirataki (sp?) noodles made out of tofu? I heard that they are a great substitute for pasta, if you are watching carbs. I have yet to experiment with them yet, but plan on it. I guess you have to rinse them and then par boil to get the smell/fish taste off?

I agree with the comment upthread regarding the scale. Since I have started on my weight loss, I try to only look at the scale once a week. I do it at the same time every week,that way I have a better idea of what's going on. It's interesting how you can weigh yourself at 7am, drink no water, use the bathroom, walk around, weigh yourself again and be up .5 lbs or down .5lbs. My BF can fluctuate 5-10 pounds on a day to day basis. Of course it's water, but that would frustrate me. That's why its once a week for me.

Blog on and have fun!

#50 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 08 January 2008 - 12:41 AM

What Randi said--I've done a bazillion different dieting schemes over the years, enough so that I too can look at just about any food item and tell you its calories, fat grams and carb grams per unit. All these systems, whether measuring points or grams or calories, are merely tools, means to an end. If they work for you, good; if not, it's no biggie--just come up with a tracking system that works for you.

The underlying issue, at least for me (and I suspect others) is not about the rules or the food values, it's about remembering to stick to those rules and not give in to the raging Lizard Brain in your head that wants to eat everything that isn't nailed down. Or even better, to mollify the Lizard Brain enough that it's just go to sleep and leave you alone to serenely commune with your healthy meal.

View Post

Check. I too have developed into a vast (well not that vast) storehouse of nutritional info as a result of our health-related diet changes over the years. And yes, this in itself will not lose you any weight. Even subduing the Lizard Brain on a daily basis isn't quite enough for me.

In fact, as I get older, it's becoming clear that, for me, there is one critical (and difficult) element without which there will be very little lasting weight loss, and it is...building muscle. There, I said it. Now I'm going to go try and live it...my first gym visit of 2008 is hopefully in my very near future, if I can just leave my cozy apartment and get outside. Oh, and keeping yourself hydrated. Do that too.

Thanks again for talking about all this stuff as openly as I know the three of you will...

+++

Edited by markemorse, 08 January 2008 - 12:42 AM.


#51 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 08 January 2008 - 12:47 AM

3) Carbonated drinks. When I was helping out with food and drink for my mother in hospital, the medical staff were adamant that she should not have carbonated diet or sports drinks because of the high sodium content. She flatly refused to drink plain water, and despite a considerable weight problem, staff told me they'd rather she was drinking watered down juice or still drinks than diet sodas. Do any of you diabetics get warnings about diet sodas, or is it a non-issue for people in reasonable health? Here in Japan, I can fortunately drink Japan's single greatest contribution to human culture - mugicha, or roasted barley tea!

Now I am no doctor, nor do I play one on TV. :laugh: But your question got me wondering, so I did a survey of sodium content listed on various beverage labels, either in the fridge or the recycling:
--Crystal Geyser sparkling water: 35 mg/8 fl. oz
--Diet Dr. Pepper: 25 mg/8 fl. oz
--Rip It Energy Drink: 90 mg/8 fl. oz
--Gatorade: 110 mg/8 fl. oz

Gatorade's label indicated its sodium level per 8 fl. oz. serving equated to 5% of the FDA's daily Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA). DIet pundits always say you need eight 8-oz glasses daily; if you did that with Gatorade, you'd be doing some 40% of your daily sodium intake right there. But then, Gatorade is specifically an electrolyte-replacement drink, so of course it's supposed to have a lot of sodium in it. The amount in the diet soda and the sparkling water, I think, would only be of concern to those who are highly sensitive to sodium. Interestingly, US hospitals I've experienced had no qualms about doling out carbonated beverages to patients ... but I don't know if that says more about the beverages, or the US hospitals. :laugh:

5) What kind of starches do you find easiest/best for weight loss.

View Post

Ideally, complex carbs such as whole grains (brown rice, wholegrain breads, etc.) do the best job of staying in your system a long time and contributing to satiation. However, while I prefer wholegrain breads to refined white breads, I have come to realize that I don't really care all that much for brown rice or wholegrain pasta. So I try to make as much of my carb intake whole-grain as possible, but also give myself a pass to enjoy white rice and rice noodles. I'm also really into doing my starches as starchy vegetables--potatoes, winter squashes, etc.--because I find them really filling and satisfying. Plus orange vegetables like winter squashes and sweet potatoes are nutrient powerhouses. In other words, all other things being equal, I go for foods with lots of nutritional value per unit.

Mizducky..are the shirataki (sp?) noodles made out of tofu?  I heard that they are a great substitute for pasta, if you are watching carbs.  I have yet to experiment with them yet, but plan on it.  I guess you have to rinse them and then par boil to get the smell/fish taste off?

View Post

Shirataki are made of konnyaku, a gel-like foodstuff derived from the starchy korm of a plant known as "devil's tongue". The gel is super-low in calories and high in fiber. It's a traditional food in Japan, where it is made in tons of different shapes and colors. Its translucency and bouncy texture can take awhile to get used to if you didn't grow up eating it; when cut into the thin shirataki noodles, I find it a little like some very bouncy bean thread noodles. Recently, some manufacturers have taken to making tofu/konnyaku mix noodles--these noodles, with their opaque white color and more tender texture, are a bit easier on non-Asian newcomers to the food because their look and mouthfeel is more like wheat pasta, while still being relatively low in calories. A lot of people find the odor of konnyaku products straight out of the package a little off-putting; some recipes I've seen recommend parboiling, or pouring boiling water over them in a sieve, but I find it sufficient to just give them a good rinse with hot tap water. There's a long topic about konnyaku somewhere here on eGullet--I'll see if I can hunt it down later.

#52 markemorse

markemorse
  • participating member
  • 784 posts
  • Location:Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Posted 08 January 2008 - 01:22 AM

Maybe this is the konnyaku thread of which mizducky speaks?

#53 mizducky

mizducky
  • participating member
  • 2,407 posts
  • Location:San Diego, CA

Posted 08 January 2008 - 02:10 AM

Maybe this is the konnyaku thread of which mizducky speaks?

View Post

You got it! :smile:

#54 Domestic Goddess

Domestic Goddess
  • participating member
  • 1,738 posts
  • Location:South Korea, orig. from Philippines

Posted 08 January 2008 - 04:56 AM

I'd like to answer the question about plantains being a veggie or a fruit. It is a fruit. In fact it is a cousin to the banana ergo it is a fruit. But like the tomato, it is incorporated into many savory dishes that sometimes one might think it is a veggie. :)
Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

#55 C. sapidus

C. sapidus
  • participating member
  • 2,584 posts
  • Location:Maryland

Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:43 AM

But the good news--besides the yumminess--is that the net amount of meat isn't all that much--but the size of the heads, and the amount of work you have to put into getting all the meat out, tricks the ol' Lizard Brain into feeling like it had a nice big meal.

View Post

And fortunately, ol' Lizard Brain doesn't read the internet. :wink:

I'm loving all of this so far - blog on!

#56 C. sapidus

C. sapidus
  • participating member
  • 2,584 posts
  • Location:Maryland

Posted 08 January 2008 - 05:57 AM

Oh gosh, question time here! Even without trying to reverse the weight that snuck up on me over a few stressful years, I have a hard time balancing meals for hungry teen boys, underweight husband and overweight me.

View Post

Ooh, ooh, can I jump in on this one? Thai and Vietnamese meat salads are great for this. Skinny and growing diners get a big hunka meat with a little salad; those in slimming mode get a big salad flavored with a little meat. Very satisfying for all. If you like lime, chiles, and fish sauce, nuoc cham makes a wonderful salad dressing.

#57 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 08 January 2008 - 06:07 AM

I'd like to answer the question about plantains being a veggie or a fruit. It is a fruit. In fact it is a cousin to the banana ergo it is a fruit. But like the tomato, it is incorporated into many savory dishes that sometimes one might think it is a veggie. :)

View Post



Thanks Dodi!!

#58 CaliPoutine

CaliPoutine
  • participating member
  • 2,931 posts
  • Location:Santa Clarita, CA

Posted 08 January 2008 - 06:40 AM

Good Morning.

I slept like a rock. I think it was the combination of a lot less food and the exercise. Supposedly, I woke up at midnight and put one of my dogs in our bed. I have no recollection of that. Scary!!

To answer Susans question about hydration. We have one of these.

Posted Image

Having moved here from California, I was accustomed to bottled water. I mean, no one I know ever drank tap water. I was appalled when Robin told me she actually drinks and likes tap water. We did end up getting Culigan after about a year of me dragging home bottles from the grocery store. I like my beverages really cold!! I usually freeze half of a Nalgene bottle and then add water to it. I also drink crystal light, low sodium club soda, mineral water, diet coke and diet dr. pepper. Like Mizducky, I really like fizz.


Before I went to sleep last night, I made Robin's snack box for today.

Posted Image

She's going to "try" the blackberries. She's not really a fruit lover. I made her a turkey sandwich, pretty much the same as yesterday and a few kettle brand salt and pepper krinkle cut chips. She told me that she wasnt hungry at all yesterday, so thats a good sign.

I'll be back later as I have a date with Ms. Treadmill.

Posted Image

#59 chemprof

chemprof
  • participating member
  • 128 posts
  • Location:NC

Posted 08 January 2008 - 06:42 AM

Thanks so much to all of you for this blog! I'm looking forward to it, and I'm hopeful that it will jump-start me into a food and exercise plan for 2008, which got a bit sidetracked in 2007, and has kept off track by a bad semester and a kitchen reno. Now to skulk over to WW Online and write down breakfast. :raz:

#60 MarketStEl

MarketStEl
  • participating member
  • 3,722 posts
  • Location:Oxford Circle, Philadelphia

Posted 08 January 2008 - 08:56 AM

Okay, I'm back, ensconced in my cubicle, Urban Knights playing on my headphones, and a stack of back Activant Insights newsletters at my side to prep for a meeting next week.

The new commute will have to wait a bit -- I'm missing a shot or two to document it, and sure enough, I have no image editing software on my office computer (Windows Paint doesn't hack it).

In the meantime, some followup comments and the rest of yesterday.

1)That salad colander - does that maybe go in the fridge with a lid on, and keep salad greens usable for more than one meal? If so, does it work, and how many days will salad greens keep?

2) Lactose intolerance - my Japanese husband (just to differentiate from all the OTHER husbands!) can and does eat a lot of yogurt (whole milk, unsweetened, home-made), a little cheese, and almost never milk.

3) Carbonated drinks. When I was helping out with food and drink for my mother in hospital, the medical staff were adamant that she should not have carbonated diet or sports drinks because of the high sodium content. She flatly refused to drink plain water, and despite a considerable weight problem, staff told me they'd rather she was drinking watered down juice or still drinks than diet sodas. Do any of you diabetics get warnings about diet sodas, or is it a non-issue for people in reasonable health? Here in Japan, I can fortunately drink Japan's single greatest contribution to human culture - mugicha, or roasted barley tea!

4) Does the weightwatcher point system combine easily with the diabetic "food exchange" system?

5) What kind of starches do you find easiest/best for weight loss.

View Post


1) Yes. The salad spinner has both a centrifuge top and a storage lid. I usually buy my salad greens once a week, on Saturday, from O.K. Lee in the Reading Terminal Market -- he sells bagged romaine mix and spring mix for 99c/bag. I usually buy one of each, a head of radicchio, some bell peppers, a carrot, and a package (roughly 8 oz) of sliced mushrooms. Assembling the salad is fairly simple: Mix the bags (and tear the romaine some more--the produce vendors in the RTM leave huge chunks in their salad mix bags), slice the peppers, tear the radicchio, shred the carrot, and dump the sliced mushrooms into the mix. Spin, drain the water, put the spun-out carrot slivers back in the salad, toss a little, cover and refrigerate. I find that I can get an entire week's worth of tossed salads out of this purchase, which runs me somewhere in the neighborhood of $6-$7. Tomatoes add anywhere from $1 to $3 to the total, depending on the season and where I buy them; currently, 9th Street vendors are offering pint packages of grape Romas (pictured upthread) for a buck each. Even if half of them go bad, as the ones I bought last week did, I still come out ahead.

2). I almost never consume milk, except with cereal. Cheese is my principal Lizard Brain hazard, followed by sour cream-based dips with carbohydrates to dip in them. I did pay attention to Ellen's comments in her last foodblog about the urge to snack late at night -- something that pre-rational critter tells you to do -- and had been doing pretty well at avoiding this until the holidays. I find that eating a good dinner greatly diminishes the temptation to give into my Lizard Brain; however, this also flies in the face of a common bit of diet advice, which is, "Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper." Yet I do better at keeping my weight down if I don't do that, because otherwise, I will be sorely tempted to pull out the chips or crackers and cheese or dip as I 'Net-surf before going to bed around midnight Eastern Time.

3). When I was sober, I found that fruit juice mixed with seltzer water was a good substitute for a mixed drink, and I still drink such combos from time to time. But more often, I find myself consuming Coke Zero or plain water at home. But flavored seltzer is IMO a decent low-sodium, low-calorie alternative to plain old water.

There is one beverage I consume even more of. I'll reveal it in my next post.

To answer Susans question about hydration.  We have one of these.

Posted Image

Having moved here from California, I was accustomed to bottled water.  I mean, no one I know ever drank tap water.  I was appalled when Robin told me she actually drinks and likes tap water.    We did end up getting Culigan after about a year of me dragging home bottles from the grocery store.  I like my beverages really cold!!  I usually freeze half of a Nalgene bottle and then add water to it.  I also drink crystal light, low sodium club soda, mineral water, diet coke and diet dr. pepper.  Like Mizducky, I really like fizz.

View Post


I did notice on my first visit to Los Angeles in 1966 that there were lots of ads for bottled water; I guess Angelenos didn't much care for their municipal supply, which is funny given that a few years ago, Consumer Reports magazine did a taste comparison of several municipal supplies and some popular brands of bottled water -- and the municipal supplies of New York and LA finished 1-2 in the rankings.

People in Philadelphia love to complain about the taste of "Schuylkill Punch", and if chlorine in your water is a great worry for you, then I'd guess you'd want to avoid drinking Philadelphia's municipal supply -- or that of just about any other US city but New York, for that matter, for most water works chlorinate their water to get rid of harmful bacteria. (New York gets its water from reservoirs in the upper reaches of the Delaware River basin; as the reservoirs are protected from development, the natural filtration that occurs in the reservoirs is all the treatment New York City water gets -- or needs, it appears; that minimal treatment is probably what accounts for NYC tap water's famed taste and drinkability. By the time the Delaware reaches the City of Philadelphia's main water intake in the Torresdale section of Northeast Philadelphia, it's been past numerous industrial sites and several cities, including Trenton and the Lehigh Valley conurbation, so we aren't as fortunate as New Yorkers are.) I don't mind city water at all, but Gary and my roomie both do, so we buy bottled water in small bottles (that way everyone can drink right from the bottle without worry).

Besides Coke Zero, I also am somewhat partial to Fresca, a sugar-free grapefruit/citrus soda, especially the peach citrus variety.

As I composed this, I was informed by my boss via e-mail that there will be two groups of people here in Marketing and Sales "walking into town" at lunchtime: one group that will dine at the Canal Street Grill and another that will simply walk. Unfortunately for me, I can join neither group, for I'm set to log into the corporate new employee orientation at 12:15 pm today. (I got the Yardley office version the second week on the job.) Your introduction to the dining scene in Yardley, such as it is, will have to wait.
Sandy Smith, Exile on Oxford Circle, Philadelphia
"95% of success in life is showing up." --Woody Allen
My foodblogs: 1 | 2 | 3





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: Foodblog