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8 hours ago, Eatmywords said:

Ahh, the 'poor student' mass produced packaged ramens.  Fan or pho? (no pun). I'm sure a topic well dissected by the EG nation somewhere. I love their base potential.  Quick meal? Check. Rid the fridge of everything taking up too much space and about to go bad? Check. Challenge to make something tasty? Check.  Very difficult to screw up? Check, check check!    

 

In order; about 2 qts water, onion, celery, sweet peppers, bokchoy, shredded chicken, coconut milk, fish sc, red curry paste, 1 'shrimp' and 1 'oriental' pkg of Manuchen ramen (both packets used), 1 scrambled egg, lime juice, cilantro and thai basil (from garden).  A one hit wonder never to be repeated.

 

 

I love the whole concept, except I can't abide by the flavor packets! 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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10 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Two nights ago...time flies...

 

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I braised these lovely globe artichokes. It's a good thing they're lovely, cause they cost like $4 a piece! (I remember, years ago when living in San Jose, getting big artichokes at 4 for $1!!)  But then when I used to be able go to restaurants, and said restaurants had artichokes on their menus, and said artichokes were like $16, I understand. I wanted to make it easy for Significant Eater, so I butchered the artichokes before service...

 

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Significant Eater, no yogurt lover she, was in love with the dipping stuff. Whereupon I had to confess; yogurt based, a little mayo, horseradish, pimenton, lemon, garlic powder, olive oil. And 4 perfect artichoke heart halves.

 

That was the fancy part. The main plate - reheated everything. Fried polenta (what a fucking mess that makes!), meatballs in sauce, mushroom ragout...

 

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I find polenta and grits hard dishes to reheat.  They never really come back together in the same delicious way.  Same with risotto.  I wonder If the CSO on steam would work...right now my aim is to make the right amount so there are no leftovers.
 

your artichokes look really nice.  It is hard to find good artichokes...ones that have been treated 

properly so they are not dried out.  Sigh.

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5 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

I find polenta and grits hard dishes to reheat.  They never really come back together in the same delicious way.  Same with risotto.  I wonder If the CSO on steam would work...right now my aim is to make the right amount so there are no leftovers.

 

Risotto works much better (imo), so keep trying that.  I'm thinking risotto cakes in a frying pan. They may not be perfect (what is?), but they're delicious.

 

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Polenta possibly not worth the trouble (I am not doing the frying thing again), though I imagine it could be reheated stove top, with water added, and be brought back to the baby food state. Not that there's anything wrong with that. 

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I buy the Anson  Mills polenta which when shipped across the continent on a northerly angle they are quite costly.  This I will be very careful with but, yes I agree run of the mill polenta being tossed due to lack deliciousness is ok with me.  Thanks.

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Going on week two of eating a plant based diet, also cutting out alcohol.. I am down 8 pounds and feeling great.  I am eating one big meal in the evening with a little something mid day..I don't know if I would have eaten dinner if i didn;t feel like cooking as I wasn't so hugnry.. But,  I did cook and it was really good. 

 

I covered a cauliflower head in harissa.. I added some oil to the top and water to the bottom.. Roasted at 400 degrees covered with 45 minutes and uncovered for another 20..

 

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I made a tahini and served with the cauliflower.. Also made a dal.. the dal was a little spicy and i also added palm sugar which gave it a great sweetness.. The dal had cayenne, a hot sauce my friend made, cinnamon, a little clove, garam masala, star anise, tomato paste, onion, ginger, garlic and paprika. 

 

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salad was ginger dressing with soy and sesame oil. 

 

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Edited by BKEats (log)
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15 hours ago, weinoo said:

I love the whole concept, except I can't abide by the flavor packets! 

 

On their own I would agree but w the myriad of seasonings and sauces I dump in there they just add a bit of flavored salt when needed.

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That wasn't chicken

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20 hours ago, Duvel said:

I watched „Somebody feed Phil“ yesterday, the Chicago episode. Craved a fried polish hot dog topped with sweet onions the whole day. Netflix be damned ...

 

I ran out of food tv and started on Phil (great name btw).  I don't love his personality.  Can be a bit awkward and clueless but it's pretty well shot and produced.   

That wasn't chicken

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@Captain– I showed Mr. Kim your spaghetti and meatballs and it is giving us ideas!

 

@robirdstx– I will abstain from entering into criticizing your husband regarding the catsup because about once every three years I crave a boiled hot dog placed catty corner on a piece of white bread covered with American cheese and topped with catsup. 

 

@Eatmywords – I am actually a fan of college-kid ramen.  Fixed up or according to the packet.   I even like the flavor packets.  My favorite is what they used to call “Oriental” and now call “Soy Sauce”, though the packet kindly reminds you that it is “the same Oriental flavor”.  I do a salad that uses the noodles (baked with sesame seeds and almonds) as croutons and the seasoning packet in the dressing.  I also do a quick-fry noodles on the side of fish or shrimp sometimes – noodles, onions, snow peas. 

 

@Duvel – so glad you mentioned “Somebody Feed Phil”.  We had somehow missed the very existence of this show!  We loved “I’ll Have What Phil’s Having” and are really happy to know he’s back.  I really love his attitude and joy and gratitude.

 

@weinoo – fried polenta and grits are a giant PITA.  It is like trying to dodge a freaking firecracker tossed at your feet.  I know it can be done because I’ve had fried cakes at restaurants, and they are delicious.  I wish someone would tell the secret!

 

@Franci– the texture you are getting in your pizza crust is remarkable! 

 

@Ann_T– do you make gravy/sauce fresh for every meal or do you keep packets of it in your freezer?

 

Night before last, we took some stuff out to the country to Mr. Kim’s dad and stepmom (health issues and we’ll be joining the family in trying to help them), so no time to make dinner.  Mr. Kim jumped at Chinese food over fast food.  Stopped at our favorite place and gave them some support:

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Egg rolls, crab Rangoon, shrimp fried rice, and orange beef.  There was also wonton soup. 

 

Last night dinner was a redo of the night before.  I took our leftovers (shrimp fried rice and orange beef) and added canned water chestnuts and bamboo shoots and steamed it in the CSO, then fried it hot and fast in oil on top of the stove.  I looked for some vegetables to add at the store, but they had nothing appropriate (I realized AFTER dinner that I had some peas in the freezer, and they would have been good to add).  It turned out very well, though.  I’ll do this again with our Yen Ching leftovers!

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Leftover soup and crab Rangoon on the side:

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1 hour ago, Kim Shook said:

 

@weinoo – fried polenta and grits are a giant PITA.  It is like trying to dodge a freaking firecracker tossed at your feet.  I know it can be done because I’ve had fried cakes at restaurants, and they are delicious.  I wish someone would tell the secret!

 

 

Kim -- put the grits in a loaf pan and put them in the fridge. When they set up, slice them and lay them out on a plate and chill again. Flour them heavily, then fry in about 1/4 inch of oil on medium high heat. And do NOT try to turn them until they have time to get good and brown on one side.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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About a week ago, I got an email from ThermoWorks with a YouTube link to "Texas Style BBQ Ribs with Rusty Monson".  I had some ribs that I had trimmed in the freezer so when they thawed, I tried it today.  There are a lot of things in this recipe that are similar to Franklin's  Brisket technique so I doubted it would turn out as well on pork ribs, but it worked out very well.  I thought cooking it to 202º would be too long for ribs but it wasn't. I had cooked ribs by time but I probably will go with temperature from now on.  The flavor was a lot more robust than how I have always made them.  He wrapped it in butcher paper and two ply  of foil.  I didn't have butcher paper and used  parchment which was not wide enough to hold itself down so the foil made it possible to hold it tight around the ribs. I took the paper off before I took this picture.  Sides were garlic bread, slaw and potato salad.

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Makes me want to go to NOLA and eat at Antoine's.

 

(ETA: the crab, not the ribs. Though the ribs looked awfully good.)

 

Edited by kayb (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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3 hours ago, shain said:

Quiche with roasted peppers, feta, kashkaval cheese, some chili, thyme, nutmeg.

 

Shai, this is totally fabulous!

Please reveal how you make the (pastry) shell.

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On 6/4/2020 at 7:17 PM, weinoo said:

 

Risotto works much better (imo), so keep trying that.  I'm thinking risotto cakes in a frying pan. They may not be perfect (what is?), but they're delicious.

 

1199213153_Risottocakes04-29.jpeg.032d1e1973940f28f3ae16668258bb31.jpeg

 

Polenta possibly not worth the trouble (I am not doing the frying thing again), though I imagine it could be reheated stove top, with water added, and be brought back to the baby food state. Not that there's anything wrong with that. 

 

I love fry polenta, fried in butter of course. Your  polenta is on the soft side, compared to mine,  it might be trickier to fry. You could make gnocchi di polenta. In my mom’s hometown they are known for coarser polenta and a little thicker, once cold is easily sliceable and absolutes no problem to fry or grill. Sharing if anybody cares:  in risotto al salto I don’t use any eggs or breadcrumbs, just risotto and I still manage to turn the rice.  In the pan I use a ring to make the cakes and press down a bit the risotto, then, I’ll remove the ring to form the next cake. My trick, besides time to form the crust, is to put the ring back on the cake and I have a super flexible spatula, present of a Japanese friend (very cute, with a frog shape) that is really good at the task. Flip, remove the ring and slowly form the crust on the other side. 

 

 

4 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

 

 

@Franci– the texture you are getting in your pizza crust is remarkable! 

 

 

 

Thank you @Kim Shook, you are always so kind! 

 

I’ve seen some many good meals tonight! 

 

Tonight I’ve grilled some Key West pink shrimps, fried cod for the kids, fried zucchini, cauliflower and a little bit of bruschetta with the bread of the other day. 

885D1E4A-8F28-4403-B63B-00736D3F1435.jpeg

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