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Anna N

The Savory Baking Topic

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This requires a level of participation I've been backing away from but, damn!, you present an incredibly tempting project.     Beautifully done.

 

Question, what is the keeping quality of these pizza rolls?     Bake and eat, i am guessing.    

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eGullet member #80.

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16 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

I'm pretty sure some of the Vetri books have turned up as Kindle deals..

You're correct. That Kindle book was just on sale at the end of July. I am sure I posted it in the "Crazy Good e-Book Bargains" thread. It's not on sale now but I will re-post it there if it goes on sale again.

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I just read some of the reviews on the Vetri book.  Does it really ask for yeast to be measured in 1/132 and 1/128 teaspoons as some reviewers stated?

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2 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

This requires a level of participation I've been backing away from but, damn!, you present an incredibly tempting project.     Beautifully done.

 

Question, what is the keeping quality of these pizza rolls?     Bake and eat, i am guessing.    

Thanks!  I ate one of these last night and froze the rest.  After seeing your query, I re-heated one in the CSO (edited to add, steam bake, 300°F, 7 minutes) and it was quite good.  I'm not sure I nailed the timing as it was a tiny bit cool smack-dab in the center but I can work it out. They're chewy, as one would expect from a pizza dough but the bottom and top re-crisped as nicely as they were when freshly baked.

I made these as written in the main recipe and they are fairly large.  Meal-sized, almost.  I considered freezing some before baking, like the thaw, proof and bake croissants at TJ's but at this size, that requires more advance planning than is my nature. 

Next time, I'll make the mini versions and may play around more with that option, though I think having something already baked (or at least par-baked)  that can be easily re-heated is more what I'd like.

 

58 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I just read some of the reviews on the Vetri book.  Does it really ask for yeast to be measured in 1/132 and 1/128 teaspoons as some reviewers stated?

Yes, I believe he may do this in a recipe or two.  So far, the smallest amount I've seen is in a recipe for a single pizza that calls for .03g  if you choose active dry yeast instead of fresh. That's the 1/128 teaspoon that you mention. I haven't made this one but I've read that people just use a pinch and get good results. I'd just use my drug scale 🙃. Ken Forkish also calls for similarly small amounts of yeast  in Elements of Pizza in a few recipes.  Both provide weights so it's easy to weigh the amount if you have a scale that's suitable (and I do).  Forkish also gives an easy work-around.  1/4 t yeast weighs ~ 1g so he suggests dumping it out on the counter and using a bench scraper or similar to shape it into a line (wherever did he get that idea?) and mark the line off into tenths or whatever is needed.  

I think I've made 5 or 6 different dough recipes so far and all used amounts of yeast I could dole out with measuring spoons though did I eye-ball half of a 1/8 teaspoon measure when I made half a recipe for one of the doughs.


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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@blue_dolphin.. Thank you.  I have a couple of scales that weight really teeny amounts of stuff and since he gives ingredients by weight I won't have a problem.  I'll watch for this book.  I'm guessing the reviewers don't weigh ingredients.  I do, at least the important ones.

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On 10/9/2019 at 5:53 PM, blue_dolphin said:

Funghi Rotolo from Marc Vetri's Mastering Pizza,  made with the Naples Dough at 60% hydration and way more photos than necessary 🙃

IMG_1399.thumb.jpeg.f51bf215269a4ac53b8d504e2c4d543d.jpeg

 

The photo that accompanies this recipe in the book is of the most marvelous looking oven-roasted mushroom slices and it's what drew me in.  I made a half batch, ~ 325g dough shaped into a 9 x 13" rectangle, rolled and sliced into 6 pieces. The recipe called for shredded mozzarella and I thought I bought a ball to shred up but couldn't find it so I tore up some fresh mozz and that worked fine. Next time, I'd like to try the mini-rotolos as I think they'd be great appetizers for a party.

 

12 hours ago, TdeV said:

Scrumptious, @blue_dolphin! Did I read that you thought you'd try them as appetizers next time? How many pieces would you divide the dough into? Roll them to what size?

 

Thanks!   The recipe for the full size rotolos says to roll ~ 750g of dough (Vetri's Naples dough @ 60% hydration) into a rectangle 18 x 13 inches (45 x 33 cm), after adding the filling, you roll it from the long edge, making a roll ~ 18 inches long and cut it into slices ~ 1.5 inches wide.  

For the mini size, he says to start with the same size rectangle of dough but cut it in half vertically.  That would give you 2 rectangles, each 9 x 13 inches.  You'd fill and roll from the long edge as above, this time making rolls ~ 13 inches long.  I haven't tried that yet.  

Either way, after proofing, they get baked @ 500°F, placing the baking sheet on a pre-heated pizza steel to help make a crisp bottom crust. 

 

 

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@blue_dolphin, I'm so enamoured your pictures of this dish. I'm thinking of taking it as my Thanksgiving contribution. :)

 

Does it need to be warm when it's served? And if so, should one prep it and bake it onsite, or bake it at home then reheat for 10 minutes onsite?

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Just now, TdeV said:

@blue_dolphin, I'm so enamoured your pictures of this dish. I'm thinking of taking it as my Thanksgiving contribution. :)

 

Does it need to be warm when it's served? And if so, should one prep it and bake it onsite, or bake it at home then reheat for 10 minutes onsite?

 

It's kinda like leftover pizza - OK at room temp but better warm so the cheese is a bit gooey instead of congealed.  I'd bake them at home as you want a good hot, preheated oven to get that nice crust on the bottom.  I had good luck freezing them and reheating so you could certainly do that if you want to make them ahead.

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Under construction - these will be ‘Rob’s Wedding Tarts’ - so named because a caterer made them for my friend Rob’s wedding many years ago and was happy to tell me how they were done. I’ve made them for a couple of the chocolate workshops that we held in Niagara.

 

Good excuse to pull out the Control Freak to caramelize the onions.

 

75575ED0-B5FC-432C-A55E-4BB883A7CB7A.thumb.jpeg.d558035e41d8c6702e6bc210edc2d237.jpeg

 

 

654929CC-1360-4E81-AC65-98AB46061D1C.thumb.jpeg.3a6f2e7021a05eb046cf13b64fb6436a.jpeg

 

75F8D200-89BA-460C-8A1D-68786C80DDAE.thumb.jpeg.19ca345a90d1dc4206ffae0f659d1223.jpeg

 

Deglazed with some balsamic and mounted with a bit more butter.

 

B28705F8-80EA-4300-9B67-98656EB2AFC6.thumb.jpeg.bb465fe7e0e86bd9de1d5f786148b385.jpeg

 

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The tart pastry is French Tart Dough - doesn’t get any easier.

 

Thursday I’ll make a custard with egg and heavy cream - a bit of onion, custard and Stilton and they’ll be good to go.

 

 

 

 

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12 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Under construction - these will be ‘Rob’s Wedding Tarts’ - so named because a caterer made them for my friend Rob’s wedding many years ago and was happy to tell me how they were done. I’ve made them for a couple of the chocolate workshops that we held in Niagara.

 

Good excuse to pull out the Control Freak to caramelize the onions.

 

75575ED0-B5FC-432C-A55E-4BB883A7CB7A.thumb.jpeg.d558035e41d8c6702e6bc210edc2d237.jpeg

 

 

654929CC-1360-4E81-AC65-98AB46061D1C.thumb.jpeg.3a6f2e7021a05eb046cf13b64fb6436a.jpeg

 

75F8D200-89BA-460C-8A1D-68786C80DDAE.thumb.jpeg.19ca345a90d1dc4206ffae0f659d1223.jpeg

 

Deglazed with some balsamic and mounted with a bit more butter.

 

B28705F8-80EA-4300-9B67-98656EB2AFC6.thumb.jpeg.bb465fe7e0e86bd9de1d5f786148b385.jpeg

 

5368FE2E-54A8-4025-853D-F4DACBAF7210.thumb.jpeg.4c527dd061c835d66de828bea8feed70.jpeg

 

The tart pastry is French Tart Dough - doesn’t get any easier.

 

Thursday I’ll make a custard with egg and heavy cream - a bit of onion, custard and Stilton and they’ll be good to go.

 

 

 

 

Those tarts are delicious! I have made them a few times since I had them at a chocolate workshop at NOTL. Excellent reminder that I should make them for an upcoming holiday party (or two).

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On 12/17/2019 at 9:01 PM, Kerry Beal said:

Under construction - these will be ‘Rob’s Wedding Tarts’ - so named because a caterer made them for my friend Rob’s wedding many years ago and was happy to tell me how they were done. I’ve made them for a couple of the chocolate workshops that we held in Niagara.

 

Good excuse to pull out the Control Freak to caramelize the onions.

 

75575ED0-B5FC-432C-A55E-4BB883A7CB7A.thumb.jpeg.d558035e41d8c6702e6bc210edc2d237.jpeg

 

 

654929CC-1360-4E81-AC65-98AB46061D1C.thumb.jpeg.3a6f2e7021a05eb046cf13b64fb6436a.jpeg

 

75F8D200-89BA-460C-8A1D-68786C80DDAE.thumb.jpeg.19ca345a90d1dc4206ffae0f659d1223.jpeg

 

Deglazed with some balsamic and mounted with a bit more butter.

 

B28705F8-80EA-4300-9B67-98656EB2AFC6.thumb.jpeg.bb465fe7e0e86bd9de1d5f786148b385.jpeg

 

5368FE2E-54A8-4025-853D-F4DACBAF7210.thumb.jpeg.4c527dd061c835d66de828bea8feed70.jpeg

 

The tart pastry is French Tart Dough - doesn’t get any easier.

 

Thursday I’ll make a custard with egg and heavy cream - a bit of onion, custard and Stilton and they’ll be good to go.

 

 

 

 

 

These look wonderful! I love that pastry dough - it’s my go-to for tartlets. Mine always rise/bubble up in the center while they are baking, despite a good docking. Yours look like they didn’t - do you have a trick, or do my eyes deceive me? One other question: I have never in my life made a custard tart so I don’t know what a good ratio of eggs to cream would be. Can you point me to a reliable recipe? I’d love to make these for Christmas.


Patty

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Not quite sure why they didn’t rise in the middle. In the past they always have.

 

I just put in an egg and added enough cream until it looked right. I don’t know that I’ve got a proper proportion

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Tomato tart in 10 minutes to the oven.

I make these vids for my sister, then tell her she cant do it.

 

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That tomato tart is a thing of beauty. Do you pre-slice and drain your tomatoes? Mine always get gooshy when I try them.


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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I only pre sliced the tomato to stage the video, its all done with my phone and uploads can be very slow... so anything to speed things along..

No need to drain anything, unless you're slicing them very thin...too thin?

I did cut one half to show my sis, count the number of slices.

Gourmet magazine asked for this recipe , my old boss turned them down.

 

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I was making this quick bread today. It was a French recipe but the person who I followed  the recipe swapped buckwheat flour for regular flour. I liked the idea, but then, I thought what’s up with American buckwheat flour? why is this sucking so much more liquid...and I made a couple more variations: like omitting parmigiano and using nutritional yeast, using tahini instead of oil, using Greek yogurt with some milk instead of milk. I was adding liberally more milk and my final thought was: what a shame to have all these ingredients to end up in the garbage!   I really thought I was going to throw it away. But I was wrong...buckwheat products could be heavy. I love it! Wonderful! Now if I have to make it again it will never be the same 🤣🤣🤣

B7A7513B-940F-412A-BC4E-6AD6426513B5.jpeg


Edited by Franci (log)
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y6B8A9550-A652-4128-AB26-EEAA0BA96EC2.thumb.jpeg.43ad39ebeb60b8f0535d855143d1c593.jpeg

 

 

 

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Beer/cheese/caramelized onion quick bread. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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55 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@Anna N 

 

and you Bake it How ?

In the Breville smart oven. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Hopefully baking for the true Commander of the Household, The Dog, qualifies as savory baking topic worthy.   I am making Alton Brown's Stinkin' Dog Treats, in the outside oven (an Oster French Door countertop).   I don't do the fancy shaping, I just make giant kibble shapes, so easy.

IMG_9227.jpg

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Posted (edited)

I noticed that @Shelby posted about her Sriracha Maple Snack Mix in this topic so I figure I can continue the theme with this Spicy Glazed Nut & Pretzel mix from David Lebovitz's book Drinking French.  The recipe is also available here on his blog

IMG_2582.thumb.jpeg.fe44cc9805c39e8d08899b27805c4b09.jpeg

Not that you can tell in the photo but everything got coated in a mix of brown sugar, maple syrup, butter, salt, cayenne & cinnamon before baking.   Very good. 

 

Now to track down that Sriracha Snack Mix recipe.....


Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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