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Chartreuse and Cocktails with Chartreuse


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#121 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 03:45 PM

How does one get the bottle open?  (This question has time value.)



#122 Hassouni

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:04 PM

Unscrew it? Mine is a screw top, nothing special at all



#123 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:21 PM

The top two inches of mine were covered in thick chocolate colored wax.  After trying a few things unsuccessfully I donned safety goggles and went at it with a Kyocera cera planer.  I now have most of the wax off, and only a couple broken nails...but I am no closer to actually getting the cork out.

 

A screw cap sounds like a great invention.



#124 Hassouni

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:39 PM

Do you have a mega old bottle? Did you buy it recently? If so, it could be really old stock. I've never seen Chartreuse sold with anything except a screw top. If it's really antique, then you've scored big time. Chartreuse is one of if not the only liqueur/spirit that improves with age in the bottle. Pouring Ribbons even has decades old vintages of Chartreuse that they sell by the ounce for a hefty pricetag.



#125 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:55 PM

I just bought the bottle but I believe it is said to be aged eight years in wood.  After my last post I used a foil cutter designed for opening a wine bottle and scored the top a bit.  Then I chipped at it with the Kyocera till I exposed the cork and got the bottle open.  After that I brought out the Shop Vac.

 

Now the question remains, how to keep the bits of wax out of the Chartreuse?  I've opened other wax sealed bottles before, but nothing quite like this.



#126 Hassouni

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:00 PM

I think you must have the Chartreuse VEP, which is aged in oak. Was it in the price range of normal Chartreuse ($50-60)? If so, you got a hell of a deal, that stuff is rare and expensive.



#127 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:12 PM

It was $166, as I recall.



#128 KD1191

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:14 PM

Yep, that's VEP, and the wax, especially on older bottles, is some of the hardest I've seen used for this sort of application.
True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

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#129 KD1191

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:16 PM

I've always chipped away with the foil cutter of a wine key...once you expose the plastic cap you're nearly there. Score around the base a few dozen times and pull.
True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#130 Hassouni

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:16 PM

It was $166, as I recall.

 

Damn



#131 KD1191

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:18 PM

Damn


It's typically sold in 1L bottles, if that helps lessen the sting at all...
True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#132 Hassouni

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:22 PM

Not really  :laugh:



#133 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 05:31 PM

The wax must cost something.


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#134 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 06:58 PM

Since I did manage to get the bottle open, and since I have been researching gin...and since I have a glut of grapefruit, I made a Cloister:

 

http://forums.egulle...book/?p=1951319

 

 

I reduced the syrup to a teaspoon, down from a quarter ounce:

 

1 1/2 oz Bombay Dry

1/2 oz Yellow Charteuse VEP

1/2 oz white grapefruit juice

1/4 oz lemon juice

1 teaspoon syrup

 

 

This is far too sweet, I can't say I enjoy it.  There is no juniper to speak of, the sugar rides over everything.  If I were to make this again I would use Malacca instead of Bombay, and increase the gin to two ounces -- and decidedly omit the syrup entirely.

 

 

 

Edit:

 

So I did that.  I also upped the citrus by about a half ounce because that's just the way it happened.  Much better beverage.  The botanicals really stand out in a good way.


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker, 25 April 2014 - 07:46 PM.


#135 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 08:01 PM

To save any confusion, the recipe for my variation of the Cloister was:

 

2 oz Malacca

1/2 oz Yellow Charteuse VEP

3/4 oz fresh white grapefruit juice

1/2 oz fresh lemon juice



#136 Hassouni

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:07 PM

Oh, your VEP is the yellow?

 

I would highly recommend getting a bottle of the standard, unaged Chartreuse verte - it's utterly sublime.



#137 JoNorvelleWalker

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:11 PM

Since I like the yellow I will certainly consider the green...maybe not for a bit...this has been an expensive week and I still have Appleton 12 on order.



#138 Czequershuus

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 06:31 AM

Given the relative heat wave of late, and my observation that bottle of Chartreuse was still quite full, I chose to revisit on of my favorite summertime cocktails.

 

The Chartreuse Swizzle (Link)

1.25 Oz Green Chartreuse

1 Oz Pineapple Juice

0.75 Oz Lime Juice (now at mercifully reduced price!)

0.5 Oz Falernum (Velvet)

Build over crushed ice in a tall glass, swizzle.

 

So refreshing, spicy, and oddly balanced. I think next time I may try it substituting Becherovka for the Falernum, as Dan did here in the drinks thread for the Crafty and Elusive Elk. 


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#139 Hassouni

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 09:30 AM

Since I like the yellow I will certainly consider the green...maybe not for a bit...this has been an expensive week and I still have Appleton 12 on order.

 

Green is far superior



#140 Rafa

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 11:50 AM

That's up to taste, my friend. I agree with you (I like the pungent spiciness of the green), but the honeyed mellowness of the yellow has its own appeal. Despite the family resemblance they're quite different products, both on their own and in mixed drinks.


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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937


#141 KD1191

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 12:26 PM

Green, being higher proof and lower sugar, is certainly going to have a greater appeal among the (typically) Fernet and Barrel-proof spirit-loving cocktail cognoscenti. That said, I have it on good authority that the monks typically take theirs mixed, around 2:1 green to yellow. If that's not exactly picking a favorite child, it's at least signaling a belief that one has greater potential.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#142 Hassouni

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Posted 02 June 2014 - 02:08 PM

Green, being higher proof and lower sugar, is certainly going to have a greater appeal among the (typically) Fernet and Barrel-proof spirit-loving cocktail cognoscenti. 

 

Das me!


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#143 Czequershuus

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Posted 03 June 2014 - 02:50 PM

Reporting back on the Chartreuse Swizzle with Becherovka in place of Falernum. It worked out quite well, preserving the balance of the drink, while drying it out slightly. I don't think I like it better than the original, but it is certainly on par. 

 

As for a name(does such a small variation need a name?) I did type the cocktail into google translate and turn it into Czech. It comes out as Chartreuska Swizzle, which I think is rathe pleasing. 



#144 FrogPrincesse

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Posted Yesterday, 12:57 PM

Chartreuse and falernum is a winning combo.

 

After an attempt at setting the kitchen on fire,

 

14604380428_e3f543470d_z.jpg
 

...I was able to enjoy being At Peace With What Once Was (Jonny Almario), a Vellocet-inspired cocktail (itself very similar to the Chartreuse Swizzle discussed above), with vermouth. Green chartreuse, sweet vermouth (Punt e Mes), falernum (homemade), mole bitters.

 

I have to admit that I am sometimes guilty of picking cocktails not based on ingredients alone, but also names (I know, that sounds awfully superficial. It is what is inside that counts.). An interesting name is always more intriguing, plus it's easier to remember. Also it's fun to serve to other people, and even better if there is a good story that goes with the name. No idea what the story is with that one though. I will have to make something up.

 

 

14787878951_526fef36de_z.jpg
 

 

 

 

 



#145 Czequershuus

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Posted Yesterday, 03:28 PM

 
I have to admit that I am sometimes guilty of picking cocktails not based on ingredients alone, but also names (I know, that sounds awfully superficial. It is what is inside that counts.). An interesting name is always more intriguing, plus it's easier to remember. Also it's fun to serve to other people, and even better if there is a good story that goes with the name. No idea what the story is with that one though. I will have to make something up.
 
 
14787878951_526fef36de_z.jpg


I do the same thing. I sometimes find myself really hoping a cocktail with an awesome name will be brilliant, and then being terribly disappointed when it is not. But when a great name accompanies a great cocktail, it is just a win-win.

#146 KD1191

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Posted Yesterday, 07:04 PM

...I was able to enjoy being At Peace With What Once Was (Jonny Almario), a Vellocet-inspired cocktail (itself very similar to the Chartreuse Swizzle discussed above), with vermouth. Green chartreuse, sweet vermouth (Punt e Mes), falernum (homemade), mole bitters.

 

But...but...the burned mint is the best part of the Vellocet.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

#147 FrogPrincesse

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Posted Yesterday, 07:16 PM

No need to worry - after the kitchen countertop pyrotechnics, I set another 1/2 oz of chartreuse on fire and finished preparing the cocktail properly. I did not attempt taking a picture of the process that time, just the finished result.

#148 KD1191

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Posted Yesterday, 07:42 PM

No need to worry - after the kitchen countertop pyrotechnics, I set another 1/2 oz of chartreuse on fire and finished preparing the cocktail properly. I did not attempt taking a picture of the process that time, just the finished result.

 

I'm worried because the recipe for the At Peace With What Once Was has you pouring the flaming Chartreuse on top before you garnish with mint, and your mint does not appear to be singed.


True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour