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Sorbet: Tips, Techniques, Recipes


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#181 Wendy DeBord

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Posted 16 April 2005 - 10:21 PM

Welcome to The eGullet Society For Arts & Letters Ekaterina!

I hope you are familar with Nicole Kaplan? You'd be hard pressed to get better advice.

#182 Ekaterina

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Posted 17 April 2005 - 09:10 AM

use boiron puree and use their recipe, they have tons of info on how to make exemplary sorbets

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Dear Nicole,

thank you very much for your advice. I will definitely check it out. I think that we are gettting the shipment in next week. I will advise my chef, that he should give their recipe a try.

Katya

#183 JSkilling

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Posted 17 April 2005 - 10:36 AM

If you go here:

http://www.boironfre.../uk/uk_docs.htm

and click on the sorbets you'll see all their recipes. They've already figured out how much of everything you need to keep your sorbets smooth and creamy.
Josette

#184 halloweencat

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:07 PM

hello, and thanks in advance --

i'm looking for a vanilla sorbet recipie. i've found everything from chocolate to kiwi to spranglefussengugleberries -- but nothing for plain vanilla.

also looking for recommendations for good recipie books on sorbet/ice cream.


cheers :)

hc

#185 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:15 PM

Voila! Vanilla Sorbet! :biggrin:

Sorbet (Cook?)Books ....
My favorite is:
Irresistible Sorbets: Sherbets, Water Ices & Granitasby Sara Lewis
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#186 halloweencat

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:30 PM

many thanks! :)

my SO (who is comparatively young, considering), just got his chloresterol numbers back basically, the doctor said "immediate action."

he's been very contientious and i really admire his turnaround. the vanilla sorbet request was for him ('tho i will make ample use of it, as i no longer eat ice cream, by preference).

thanks as well on the book recommendation.

many thanks and cheers :)

hc

#187 halloweencat

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:32 PM

hmmm...i just looked at that recipie...

aren't sorbets supposed to be sans dairy? this one has heavy cream. :?


cheers :)

hc

#188 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:33 PM

Cholesterol?? :shock: Ooops! then this recipe isn't so good because 2 of the ingredients are 1 cup heavy (whipping) cream and 1 cup milk ..

Let me see what I can do since I now know about the cholesterol issues ...

perhaps a Lovely Lavendar Lipitor sorbet for you?? :laugh:

back in a moment!! :blink:
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#189 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:37 PM

okay! without cream or fat at all ... check this out! :biggrin:

but not for diabetics, you realize ....
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#190 halloweencat

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:42 PM

gg :)

ah, perfect. :)

and the inn at castle hill is just icing on the (ice cream...errr...sorbet) cake. :) i've vacationed in newport a lot over the years, and have always wanted to give the restaurant there a spin.

many thanks again! :) SO and i will be attempting the sorbet this evening (with our new ice cream maker, no less).

thanks again! :)

cheers :)

hc

#191 jackal10

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 01:51 PM

The best source, albeit somewhat cryptic are the tables in the chapter on "Fruit Ices, Cold and Calculated" in Harold McGee's "The Curious Cook" (not the big masterwork "On Food and Cooking" 2nd Edition).

From the table on "Sweet Water Ices"

1 1/2 cups water
2 tbs lemon juice
1 tsp of good vanilla essence or scrapings from 2 vanills pods to taste.
14 tbs sugar (yes, fourteen tablespoons)

Boil together, let cool, churn/freeze, ,

Hal notes that this proportion can be used for coffee, tea, herbs etc.
The lemon juice can be omitted or increased to 1/2 cup for a lemon sorbet, in which case reduce the water so the total added liquid is 1 1/2 cups

Edited by jackal10, 05 July 2005 - 02:07 PM.


#192 ludja

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:05 PM

Granitas are also nice (and non-dairy). I especially like the rougher texture in the summer.
"Under the dusty almond trees, ... stalls were set up which sold banana liquor, rolls, blood puddings, chopped fried meat, meat pies, sausage, yucca breads, crullers, buns, corn breads, puff pastes, longanizas, tripes, coconut nougats, rum toddies, along with all sorts of trifles, gewgaws, trinkets, and knickknacks, and cockfights and lottery tickets."

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#193 bilrus

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:17 PM

The recipe linked above calls for a "sorbet stabilizer". A sorbet I made this weekend didn't set as nicely as my ice cream. I assume this would help, but what is it and where would one find it?
Bill Russell

#194 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:20 PM

The recipe linked above calls for a "sorbet stabilizer".  A sorbet I made this weekend didn't set as nicely as my ice cream.  I assume this would help, but what is it and where would one find it?

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click here
or hereThis is a large amount and probably for a restaurant business but it does smooth and stabilize the results, or so it says ... :rolleyes:
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#195 halloweencat

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:23 PM

yes, just caught the "sorbet stabilizer."

well, perhaps vanilla sorbet isn't in the cards tonight, but in a fortnight.

thanks gg, for the stabilizer resource.


cheers :)

hc

#196 Gifted Gourmet

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Posted 05 July 2005 - 02:27 PM

eGullet thread on hardness of sorbets ... (not using Levitra here) :huh: :laugh:

interesting article here on stabilizers and their use
Melissa Goodman aka "Gifted Gourmet"


#197 nathanm

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Posted 22 July 2005 - 09:19 PM

I've had quite a bit of sucess with a roasted tomato "ice cream". Basically it is oven roasted tomatoes and olive oil frozen and then ground in a pacojet. It has a great taste, perfect texture (due to the olive oil) and has zero sugar in it.

So this is one pure success and I did not have to use any specific texture ingredients, although that might not be a bad idea in other cases.
Nathan

#198 cakedecorator1968

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Posted 01 September 2005 - 09:56 PM

Could adding some Balsamic Vinegar to a mix lower the freezing point at which a sorbet sets?

Syrup was about 1200 on the density meter.

#199 nightscotsman

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 07:50 AM

I don't believe increasing the acidity of the mixture will have any effect on the freezing point. The only two ways I know of changing the freezing point are changing the sweetness level (notice I didn't say the amount of sugar, since there are several sugar types that can be used, such as glucose, sucrose and invert sugar, each with it's own sweetening power), or adding alcohol.

#200 Moopheus

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 11:59 AM

Acids will lower the freezing point of water to the degree that they will dissolve in it. Acetic acid doesn't dissolve completely, so affects the freezing point more weakly than, say, salts or alcohols.
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#201 scott123

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 04:57 PM

Balsamic vinegar also contains a decent amount of residual sugar, providing it with some freezing point depression capabilities

#202 chiantiglace

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Posted 02 September 2005 - 05:21 PM

your best bet is to make a blasamic reduction, making a syrup in which will have a higher sugar to water ratio when added.
Dean Anthony Anderson
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#203 MelissaH

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 12:11 PM

Acids will lower the freezing point of water to the degree that they will dissolve in it. Acetic acid doesn't dissolve completely, so affects the freezing point more weakly than, say, salts or alcohols.
emphasis added by MelissaH

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Actually, acetic acid is miscible with water: the two will mix (and dissolve) completely, regardless of the proportions of each. However, acetic acid is a weak acid, chemically speaking, which means that is does not dissociate completely into acetate ion and H+ (rather than staying together as one molecule of acetic acid).

Trying not to get too technical, here's a brief discussion of freezing point depression. If you dissolve stuff in a substance, the freezing point of a substance is lowered. The amount the freezing point is lowered depends ONLY on the concentration of PARTICLES of added stuff. Salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) completely ionizes in water to form Na+ cation and Cl- anion. Thus, one unit of NaCl will dissolve in water to make two particles. Sugar, on the other hand, dissolves without dissociating, so one sugar dissolves in water to make one particle. Thus, if you had two aqueous solutions, one of NaCl in some concentration and the other with an equal concentration of sugar, the solution of NaCl would have a lower freezing point than the solution of sugar: even though the concentrations of NaCl and sugar are the same, the solution of NaCl has TWICE as many particles as the solution of sugar. Acetic acid is a weak acid, so some of it will dissociate but some will not. Therefore, acetic acid won't lower the freezing point as much as a salt will, but the freezing point will be lowered. Alcohol won't dissociate when it dissolves in water either.

That said: in general, the vinegars that we can buy in the store are NOT pure acetic acid, but only about 5 or 6% acetic acid in water (maybe with some other stuff added). Remember that the more particles get added, the lower the freezing point. So getting rid of some of the water and making the vinegar more concentrated would certainly help to lower the freezing point even more.

MelissaH
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#204 chiantiglace

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 01:39 PM

thanks for detailing that melissa :biggrin:

Too bad people dont like cured salmon sorbet, because with all that salt we wouldnt ever have to worry about the freezing point.
Dean Anthony Anderson
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#205 MelissaH

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 01:46 PM

thanks for detailing that melissa  :biggrin:

Too bad people dont like cured salmon sorbet, because with all that salt we wouldnt ever have to worry about the freezing point.

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Actually, you might: too much salt and the freezing point will be so low that it won't freeze under normal ice-cream maker conditions at all! :shock:

Cold cured salmon soup, anyone?

MelissaH
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#206 Shalmanese

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 09:51 PM

Trying not to get too technical, here's a brief discussion of freezing point depression. If you dissolve stuff in a substance, the freezing point of a substance is lowered. The amount the freezing point is lowered depends ONLY on the concentration of PARTICLES of added stuff. Salt (sodium chloride, NaCl) completely ionizes in water to form Na+ cation and Cl- anion. Thus, one unit of NaCl will dissolve in water to make two particles. Sugar, on the other hand, dissolves without dissociating, so one sugar dissolves in water to make one particle. Thus, if you had two aqueous solutions, one of NaCl in some concentration and the other with an equal concentration of sugar, the solution of NaCl would have a lower freezing point than the solution of sugar: even though the concentrations of NaCl and sugar are the same, the solution of NaCl has TWICE as many particles as the solution of sugar. Acetic acid is a weak acid, so some of it will dissociate but some will not. Therefore, acetic acid won't lower the freezing point as much as a salt will, but the freezing point will be lowered. Alcohol won't dissociate when it dissolves in water either.

MelissaH

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But sucrose has a molecular weight for 342 while salt has a molecular weight of 58.5 so shouldn't that mean a given weight of salt should be over 10 times more effective at lowering the freezing point than a given weight of sugar?
PS: I am a guy.

#207 cakedecorator1968

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Posted 03 September 2005 - 10:01 PM

Hi,

Thanks for the feedback.

Unfortunately my Strawberry Balsamic Sorbet didn't quite set firm enough after a day in the main freezer. Initialy I made the mixture taste good then double checked the density to be at about 16 degrees baume. My mixture was slighty too warm during the degree check. There wasn't very much vinegar in it though, just a bit too taste.

If anyone uses the floating density meter please tell me what number you take your final syrup to....I had about an inch of glass meter sticking out of the top syrup line.

Have a nice day!

#208 K8memphis

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Posted 05 September 2005 - 04:01 PM

Acids will lower the freezing point of water to the degree that they will dissolve in it. Acetic acid doesn't dissolve completely, so affects the freezing point more weakly than, say, salts or alcohols.

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Hey Moopeus, is the title of your avatar, Busted! ?? Who is that helping him/herself??? :laugh:

#209 tan319

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 06:24 AM

A link to this Pichet Ong/Stanlet Wong Ice cream /Sorbets article thread, you guys might like it.

http://forums.egulle...showtopic=74254
2317/5000

#210 akwa

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Posted 16 September 2005 - 06:32 PM

hey nathan
the tomato oil sounds good
i used to make all of my herb oils in the paco
and serve them as herb oil ice cream qu enelles
basil is really excellent great taste and color
i think milk powder might be a good avenue for work for you as well
my favorite pate a bombe base has almost no sugar just water atomized glucose milk powder and egg yolks, you can do anything with it
only trick is the eggs
alternatively the wonderful world of stabilizing agents obviously will work; pectin is an old favorite, the mango sorbet can be mimicked by simulating the viscosity
i would suggest that rheology should be further pursued if one were to make a table of savory ice creams/viscous nature will prove to be the key i bet