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Dosa

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67 replies to this topic

#61 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 29 March 2015 - 03:34 AM

Thanks for your reply, hummingbirdkiss,  :smile:

 

But again this recipe calls for expensive equipment which is way out of my ken.

 

I know dosas were made thousands of years ago, and I know they were made without specialty Indian grinders that exist today or a Vitamix. They did not have electricity when these things were invented.

 

I want to know how to make them without expensive equipment. I'm almost sure it is possible. As I said before, much of India suffers from lack of electric power or regular outages. They make dosas everyday, and I would love to know how they do this without expensive equipment.

 

I may be too old to do it, even if given the path, but I'd still like to know how it was/is done.

 

I have a small mortar and pestle, and I suspect that's how they did it, only with a larger one.


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes, 29 March 2015 - 03:38 AM.

I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#62 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 12:43 AM

Well, okay ya'll.

 

There's been no more activity on this thread, and I suspect the people I really wanted to hear from are Indians without power or internet connections, so here goes.

 

I just put one 1/2 c. pinto beans and 1 c. basmati rice because that is what I had to soak tonight. Following mostly hummingbirdkiss's instructions. I will risk my ancient blender to grind it. When I start to smell the motor, I'll give it a rest to cool off.

 

Hummingbirdkiss, when you say, "let it sit on the counter until it looks and smells fermented (about 48 hours for me)" do you mean covered or uncovered?

 

Anyone else who can provide input as to covered or uncovered (or anything else at all) :smile: is most welcome and appreciated to reply as well. 


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#63 bague25

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 03:09 AM

Thanks for the crêpes, In India, since decades now a good electrical grinder is a must-have gadget in the kitchen. 

 

Traditionally a stone grinder like this is used, but you can imagine how labour-intensive it is. When I was a kid, my mother used one, but not any more and the same in families around.

 

For the batter, you can cover it but not in an airtight container - there should be some air movement (like for all fermentations). Make sure the batter in batter in not in a draught either.


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#64 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 04:15 AM

Thanks for your reply and video bague25,

 

I just knew that expensive electrical equipment wasn't necessary for this ancient dish!


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#65 GlorifiedRice

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Posted 08 May 2015 - 06:42 AM

You could always buy Rice Flour and Urad Dal Flour at the Indian Mkt and add water.


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Wawa Sizzli FTW!

#66 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 05:01 AM

I soaked the rice and pintos together, and then tonight I read through the stuff I'd collected years ago and filed away on hard copy in my permanent recipe file. I read just a little, then realized they all called for polished (skinless) urad dal so, I decided I'd better peel the pinto beans. I surely was grateful I'd decided to make a small batch for this experiment with only 1/2 c. pintos. I really wished I had read a little further at the point,  when before I ground anything, I did read more and realized all the recipes/instructions called for the legumes and rice to be ground separately.

 

Well that hadn't happened, so after I had fished every single bean out of the mixture and peeled it (ala Marcella Hazan), I had to go back and separate the beans and rice. After the peeling, which was accomplished while watching "Thelma and Louise" seated at the kitchen table, the separation was a cakewalk.

 

Then I ground them separately in my old Osterizer blender. It wasn't much more difficult than a pitcher of frozen margaritas, but it did require some rests for the electric motor.

 

It was actually harder to grind the rice smooth. I'd been scared of the beans, but they took a much shorter time.

 

I soaked everything together for a couple of days instead of the recommended one to save my blender. I figured It'd be easier to grind and if it wanted to do any fermenting, it could do it whole instead of ground too.

 

That seemed to work well, because it was only on the counter for about five hours before it started really bubbling. I've stuck it into the fridge for tomorrow night's dinner to delay the ferment.

 

I plan to make a spiced mashed potato mixture with peas and separate spinach and Western cheese mixture to stuff them.

 

ETA: Thanks again hummingbirdkiss for your laissez  faire, laid back attitude toward this recipe. This would never have happened without your post. I get too scared of things, like crepes and Indian crepes. But I will walk to the Indian grocery and buy polished urad dal next time, because it's just easier and less time consuming than peeling pintos, even though they seem to be working well so far.


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes, 10 May 2015 - 05:10 AM.

I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#67 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 10 May 2015 - 09:34 PM

I cooked some dosa tonight. The first one was way too thick and not salty enough, so I added water and salt. The next one was thinner and still not salty enough for me, but I was afraid to add too much salt and interfere with the fermentation. I kept adding water between cooking each one, but the last one I cooked still wasn't as paper thin and crisp as the ones from my Indian restaurant. Mine were also much lacier with bigger bubbles and holes. Maybe paper thin style dosa are better left to the experts, but mine were certainly satisfactory, quite good in fact.

 

My potato filling was much tastier than the bland, soggy version I was offered and did not eat at the restaurant last time, so overall, I'm happy with my results, and will cook some more dosa tomorrow with the leftover batter.

 

Many thanks to everyone who offered inspiration and advice.


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 


#68 Thanks for the Crepes

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Posted 12 May 2015 - 01:05 AM

I made more dosa tonight and served them to my husband for the first time. I had kept the filling very capsaicin tame for him. He didn't join me last night because he was sick, and I could crank out a ham and grilled cheese quicker before he retired to bed.

 

He liked them and agreed to have a couple more for lunch tomorrow.

 

He did comment about there not being any meat in it, but acknowledged that they were very good anyway.

 

I ate one plain, and I have to tell you, that the flavor was much better today. No longing for more salt, just plenty of flavor on its own.

 

So I still conclude that if you want paper thin dosa, you should go to a restaurant. If you want a tasty, thin accessible wrapper make regular crepes.

 

I agree with Suvir Sarin's (legacy member) comments upthread that usually dosas aren't really as good at home.


I want to move to another planet, with pure spring water.

 

This planet would have a global climate like Hawaii, California, Florida.

 

We'd raise perfect and abundant flora and fauna!

 

Want to come with?

 

 






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