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eGfoodblog: Dave Hatfield

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#61 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 03 July 2007 - 11:55 PM

Are you simply using the mystery clamp as a pastry/cookie cutter? 

(As someone who has spent all of two weeks in France in her entire life, I am enjoying this blog greatly.)

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Nope. At the end I think I'll add up all of the suggested uses and see where we've gotten to.
You are an imaginative lot, but perhaps not thinking as a Frenchman might.

That's a hint by the way.

#62 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:03 AM

That's a great looking dinner, especially the peppers.  What are Anaheim peppers called in French?

I bought some apricots to roast today, before seeing your tart.  I'll just give them a litle brush of honey and roast them in a dish, but I'll be thinking of your tart and how delicious it must be.

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Don't know if there is a specific name. Guess there must be, but I'm not sure what it is. At the market they just seem to be called poivron vert, green peppers.
Maybe a better French speaker knows & will enlighten us.

All the tart is is your roasted apricots using a pastry shell (bowl) to hold them.

#63 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 12:09 AM

I'm sorry, but you CANNOT tell me that beast in your avatar photo is a POODLE! I thought it was some kind of bear with VERY strange ears. I KNOW a poodle can't hold its' ears up like that; neither can a daschund; no cartilage in the ear itself to keep it erect. So, what's the secret? :rolleyes:  :laugh:

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Here he is in all his glory.

You have to make allowances for a nearly full grown poodle puppy full of the joys of spring running through a meadow and me getting a very lucky shot with my new camera!

#64 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:01 AM

Before I get into what I had planned to blog about today I thought that I would share the following with you.

In the NY Times today there was an article about potato chips. Here's the link to the article.

Now, its fine to be chauvinistic about potato chips, but we hardly have a monopoly on them. The British are great lovers of crisps (chips being French fries in the UK) and sell a huge variety of types and flavors.

The French do pretty well with potato chips, but not to the extent that we or the British do. As you much expect the quality is pretty good here in France. There is not, however, the the wide variety of types & flavors that are available in the states or the UK. Plain, crinkle cut and a few flavors; that's about it. You rarely see anything like a Frito (my favorite)

What I can get, however, are bags of truly hand made potato chips which are the greatest.

Happy 4th!

#65 Simon_S

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:19 AM

Loving this blog. Your avatar has always reminded me of the pet from either Battlestar Galactica or Buck Rogers. Can't remember which.

I know you will soon reveal the proper use of "the device", but for now I will continue in the fantasy that it is used to clamp monkeys to the side of the table while you feast on the brains, Indiana Jones style.

What's that? The men in white coats have arrived...?

Si

#66 jumanggy

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:26 AM

You are an imaginative lot, but perhaps not thinking as a Frenchman might.

That's a hint by the way.

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Hmm... Crepe template? Baguette protector? Cheese slicer? Wine bottle holder? Beret hanger?

I'm just kidding, by the way :biggrin:
Loving your blog! My eyes lit up with the market photo.
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#67 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:34 AM

I have two 4th of July recipes for you. Later I'll describe what we did for the 4th.

The first recipe is for the holiday classic; potato salad. What would the 4th be without it. We all have our own favorite way of making it. This is mine and with all due modesty I can say that its really really good.

Mary’s Potato Salad

Mary was my next door neighbor when I lived in Emeryville California. Her’s was & is my favorite potato salad. She was kind enough to give me the recipe & I’ve been making it ever since.
It’s a classic for the 4th of July & has migrated well to France. The French love it!

Ingredients: (Recipe for about 10 people)
7 large potatoes (Boil with skins on until cooked through.)

1/3 Cup Italian vinaigrette (olive oil, white wine vinegar, Italian herbs,
garlic granules, salt pepper)

3/4cup Celery diced

1/3-cup onion diced

4 hard boiled eggs chopped up

1 cup mayonnaise

1/2 cup sour cream (or crème fraische)

-1~t/2 tablespoons horseradish

11/2 tablespoons Dijon mustard

Method:
-Peel cooked potatoes while still hot &.cut into bite sized pieces.
Mix the potatoes with the dressing while still hot. Chill for a couple of hours in the fridge.

- Mix all of the other ingredients with the potatoes.

- Season with salt & celery salt or seeds to taste.
Then cool in fridge for another 2 hours




Here's the second recipe

Roasted Peppers

I love roasted marinated peppers, but have always found the traditional way of doing them to be a pain in the neck. Holding under or over the grill, placing in bag, peeling … a lot of work I thought. So, being a lazy devil I decided to see what I could do to make life simpler. What follows is my simple method of doing roast peppers.

Ingredients: (for a generous appetizer)

- 1 green bell pepper per person
- 1 red bell pepper per person. (or you can use yellow or all one color)
- 1 good sized clove of garlic per pepper plus at least one ‘for the pot’
- 1 tablespoon of good quality olive oil per pepper plus extra to taste.
- 1 teaspoon of sherry vinegar per pepper plus extra to taste.
- A sprinkling of either piment de Espalion or cayenne pepper.
- About a teaspoon of drained capers or more to taste.
- Coarse ground sea.
- Day old bread about 1 ‘slice’ per person.
- Fresh endive; 4 or 5 leaves per person.

NOTE: All of the above measurements are just guidelines. Feel free to play with the proportions until you get the taste you like best.

Also note that I've used only red bell peppers this time. The simple reason is when I was making this & taking pictures I happened to have ONLY red peppers. No big deal.

Method: (turn oven grill on to high heat. That’s 275C on my oven. Adjust the top rack to about mid-oven.)

- Julienne the peppers being careful to remove all seeds and white veins.
The julienne should be lengthwise on the peppers & about 1/8 to ¼ inch wide.
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- Place the pepper strips on a rack in a roasting pan.
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- Place the roasting pan on the top rack. Roast the peppers until they become soft. As the top ones start to brown turn the peppers, using tongs, to expose new strips to the direct heat. It’s nice to have some browning, but not essential. The peppers are done when you start to see juices in the bottom of the roasting pan. The roasting process will take anywhere from 15 minutes upwards depending upon quantity, heat and placement. Don’t try to do them too fast.
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- While the peppers are roasting, peel & finely chop the garlic. Place it into a good sized bowl and mix thoroughly with the olive oil & sherry vinegar. Add the salt & “pepper”. Add the capers. Adjust the dressing until you have the taste you like.
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- Remove the peppers from the oven when done and immediately mix them with the dressing. Mix well and then cover the bowl with cling film. Let cool for a while then place in the fridge. The peppers should marinate for at least one hour, longer is better & overnight is ideal. (If overnight then take the peppers out of the fried well before serving. They are best slightly cool or at room temperature.)
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- Next & this is optional; make some croûtons. Cut day old bread into 3/8 inch cubes. Mix with a very light coating of olive oil (use your hands to mix), add S&P plus oregano or another favorite herb, place one deep on a cookie tray then roast in the oven until crisp & slightly browned.

- To serve. Carefully break off endive leaves from their stalk and place them around a plate. Add to each a portion of roasted pepper, heaping it up over the endive so that it looks nice. Sprinkle on some croûtons.

I find it wise to hold some roasted pepper back when serving this dish. Seconds are normally appreciated especially by the guys.

Simpler to do than to write up, but this dish never fails as an appetizer. I’ve never tried to keep it for more than a few days so don’t know about longer term storage.

Without the endive presentation this is a great picnic dish as it travels well.

#68 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:42 AM

Loving this blog. Your avatar has always reminded me of the pet from either Battlestar Galactica or Buck Rogers. Can't remember which.

I know you will soon reveal the proper use of "the device", but for now I will continue in the fantasy that it is used to clamp monkeys to the side of the table while you feast on the brains, Indiana Jones style.

What's that? The men in white coats have arrived...?

Si

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You could have been right during the middle ages, but, unfortunately, they ate so many that monkeys are now extinct in France.

Keep trying.

#69 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:43 AM

You are an imaginative lot, but perhaps not thinking as a Frenchman might.

That's a hint by the way.

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Hmm... Crepe template? Baguette protector? Cheese slicer? Wine bottle holder? Beret hanger?

I'm just kidding, by the way :biggrin:
Loving your blog! My eyes lit up with the market photo.

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I like beret hanger a lot! Too bad that it isn't the right answer.

#70 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:51 AM

Despite all of the imaginative guesses as to what my mystery object is used for so far nobody has got it as of yet.

Are you trying hard enough? Thinking laterally? I think you need more incentive, so.

I'm offering a prize (of sorts) to the first person who comes up with the right answer.

The winner gets a dinner for four cooked by me at our house.

The catch is that you have to come to France to collect. (you can stay as we do have several spare bedrooms.)

In the interest of fairness friends, family and local residents are ineligible to participate.

Hopefully, this will spur you on to greater feats of imagination.

#71 amapola

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 04:21 AM

You are an imaginative lot, but perhaps not thinking as a Frenchman might.

That's a hint by the way.

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...do you perhaps use it to encase a piece of round cheese, such as camembert, to help it keep its shape when you put it in the oven (for example with some slivers of garlic hidden in tiny cuts you made in the top)?

I'm loving your blog and drooling over your food pics by the way...

#72 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 05:36 AM


You are an imaginative lot, but perhaps not thinking as a Frenchman might.

That's a hint by the way.

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...do you perhaps use it to encase a piece of round cheese, such as camembert, to help it keep its shape when you put it in the oven (for example with some slivers of garlic hidden in tiny cuts you made in the top)?

I'm loving your blog and drooling over your food pics by the way...

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Nope. I might give it a try though.

#73 Abra

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 07:55 AM

This is driving me crazy. I'd guess that you stick a baguette or a saucisson through it and use it to hold while slicing, but I see neither bread nor sausage in that dinner. And unless you made the tiniest of tarts, that truc wasn't holding the pastry together either.

#74 amapola

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 08:22 AM

This is driving me crazy.

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Me, too.

You wouldn't use it as a corkscrew, would you?

No, probably not :wacko:

#75 judiu

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 10:03 AM

I'm sorry, but you CANNOT tell me that beast in your avatar photo is a POODLE! I thought it was some kind of bear with VERY strange ears. I KNOW a poodle can't hold its' ears up like that; neither can a daschund; no cartilage in the ear itself to keep it erect. So, what's the secret? :rolleyes:  :laugh:

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Here he is in all his glory.

You have to make allowances for a nearly full grown poodle puppy full of the joys of spring running through a meadow and me getting a very lucky shot with my new camera!

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AHA! What a wonderful picture it is, too! :wub:
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#76 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 01:45 PM

4th of July in France. Even though the French were on our side during the war of Independence they don’t normally celebrate the 4th of July. July 14th is their Independence Day. In one local hamlet, however, they do!

This is due to our friends Donald & Annabel. Donald is the only other American I know for miles around. He & Annabel live in a hamlet with a population of 14; twelve of whom are French. Several years ago they decided that they would celebrate the 4th by inviting everyone in the hamlet to a traditional American picnic. Of course, they also invited us as the ‘other’ Americans plus a few other local friends plus the citizens of the hamlet had a few friends & family who had to come as well. The picnic ended up with about 25-30 people. We’re not sure that the French contingent truly understands what it is they’re celebrating, but there’s nothing the French love more than a good party whatever the occasion may be. The French tend to call it the D-day party.They all appreciate D-day & remember it.
Please remember that the youngest resident of the hamlet is over 70 and that their native language is Occitan, not French and you can see where the uncertainty arises.

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The food is classic 4th of July picnic food. Burgers, salads (see Mary’s recipe) pies and so forth. The first year Donald tried to serve American hot dogs, but was politely given to understand that they were not well received. So, no hot dogs now; we barbecue fresh duck & Toulouse sausage instead. Everybody likes hamburgers though. Lots & lots of wine and beer are served of course. We start about 4 in the afternoon & go on until whenever.

Village politics are now entering the picture. Last year Madam X & M. Y got into a feud. It took quite a lot of diplomacy to get them to both attend the picnic. They sat as far apart as possible. Knowing that their owners were at loggerheads their dogs decided to get into a fight & had to be separated! It turns out that the feud is about who ate whose plums. It continues. This year no amount of diplomacy could persuade the two to come at the same time. Eventually, M. Y went to Donald & Annabel’s for a drink the evening before and Madame X came to the picnic. This year the dogs behaved themselves.
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Marcel, the local Shepard.

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Coco, world's worst sheepdog. If not kept on his lead he will attack the sheep. He oozes charm though!

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Not everyone is totally relaxed. Madame is still not convinced that all is well.

Everybody has a good time and as the evening goes on the bottles of Eau de Vie start appearing. (Think French white lightening; very, very strong) Then the singing starts. It ends up as a very friendly competition with the French speakers doing their favorites & the English speakers trying to match them song for song. The French win as there are more of them & they seem to be better at remembering the words!

Once again La entente Cordial is strengthened. I do love living in France.

#77 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:07 PM

Tomorrow. We're having a good dinner, seven people. Most of the menu is accessible I think. Here's the ingredient list:

!/2 avocado per person
A thin slice of smoked ham per person
Butter
Garlic
A package of flaky pastry (pate feuillet)
Smoked salmon Or trout slices, 4-6.
Fresh dill
1 quail per person
More garlic
Herbs de Provence
1 eggplant per 3 people
Fresh leeks to suit
Cheese to your taste
Granny smith apples
1 lemon
Flour
Sugar

The menu is:

Baked avocado with ham & garlic butter

Salmon/trout en croute

Roast quail with baked Eggplant & sautéed leeks

Cheese

Tart Tatin

The quail may be a problem. You could substitute a chicken leg/ thigh piece if the quality is good.

In any case this is a nice menu and easy to cook. We'll have fun with it.

Good night all!

#78 SuzySushi

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:39 PM

A clamp to hold a small wheel of brie in shape while slicing it into strips?
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#79 prasantrin

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 02:48 PM

If i try to think as a Frenchperson, I would narrow the gadget's uses as having to do with bread, cheese, wine, or cigarettes. My vote is as a cheesemold. Do you make your own cheese at all?

I would use it as something from which to hang poultry when drying out the skin, making it extra crispy when roasted.

#80 Smithy

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 04:25 PM

You use it to support the strainer that's holding the olives as they drain.

This is a terrific blog! I can't think like the French (je nais parlez pas Francais) but I do love the snapshots of the countryside and village life. The caption really makes the photo. :laugh:

Edited to add: or maybe it's an ash tray.

Edited by Smithy, 04 July 2007 - 09:18 PM.

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#81 BarbaraY

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 04:49 PM

I'm loving this and think your 4th of July picnic is great.
Love the doggie, too. I have met only two standard Poodles but the were very nice dogs.

I have no idea what you use the clamp for but am waiting with baited breath to know.

Madame does not look happy.

#82 LindsayAnn

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 04:50 PM

Dave,

The with holiday I have been so busy i just now noticed your blogs (and I love egullet blogs). However, I am especially interested in THIS blog. I have read and had conversations (posting conversations that is) on the cheese thread (speaking of, where has all the action been on that thread? *tears*). I am a "dave fan". You a man of my own heart. Although I am a young 25 years old I love my cheese and have tried more than most. My fiance wont even be in the same room as I when I eat some of the more smelly/stinky cheeses that I adore. Therefore, with all of your experience and the great cheese selection that you have at your fingertips I idolize you. You, sir, are a mentor to me. A cheese mentor! HAHA

I look forward to this entire journey. Horray! And thanks Dave for sharing a little piece of your world with all of us!
"One Hundred Years From Now It Will Not Matter What My Bank Account Was, What Kind of House I lived in, or What Kind of Car I Drove, But the World May Be A Better Place Because I Was Important in the Life of A Child."

LIFES PHILOSOPHY: Love, Live, Laugh

hmmm - as it appears if you are eating good food with the ones you love you will be living life to its fullest, surely laughing and smiling throughout!!!

#83 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 12:37 AM

Dave,

The with holiday I have been so busy i just now noticed your blogs (and I love egullet blogs). However, I am especially interested in THIS blog. I have read and had conversations (posting conversations that is) on the cheese thread (speaking of, where has all the action been on that thread? *tears*). I am a "dave fan". You a man of my own heart. Although I am a young 25 years old I love my cheese and have tried more than most. My fiance wont even be in the same room as I when I eat some of the more smelly/stinky cheeses that I adore. Therefore, with all of your experience and the great cheese selection that you have at your fingertips I idolize you. You, sir, are a mentor to me. A cheese mentor! HAHA

I look forward to this entire journey. Horray! And thanks Dave for sharing a little piece of your world with all of us!

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I'm blushing :wub:

See cheese post later today.

#84 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 02:12 AM

This is driving me crazy.

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Me, too.

You wouldn't use it as a corkscrew, would you?

No, probably not :wacko:

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[SIZE=14]WE HAVE A WINNER!

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Not a confident one, but a winner nonetheless.

here's the story. A few weeks ago we went over to Jean-Claud's place to see how the renovations were coming along. He's doing up a stone barn. The work is now nearly finished and the place is looking great. We ended up having dinner with about 12 French friends. We were intrigued when Jean-Claude started opening the wine with the drainpipe clamp. Necessity is the mother of invention they say. In this case he couldn't find his regular corkscrew in the building mess. Voila! A new type of corkscrew is born. Linda liked it so much that it became a cadeau from Jean-Claude.
I though that it would make a good mystery item.

Amapola, PM me to set up your dinner.

#85 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 02:42 AM

Cheese

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Four little chevre's. Aren't they pretty?

I adore cheese; in fact it’s a rare day that I don’t eat some. You’ll see me as a regular contributor to the cheese thread on this forum. This little write up is on my thoughts about cheese and I’ve stuck in lots of pictures just to whet your appetites.

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Brie and Montsalvey ready to eat.

Once again we are lucky to live in a country where excellent cheeses are readily available. France at last count supports over 600 varieties of cheese; however this is fewer than they make in Great Britain if the British tourist board is to be believed. No matter as both countries do themselves proud. We buy most of our cheeses from the mobile cheese mongers who come to the various local markets. Some are like a normal shop and offer a wide variety; others are the individual producers or local coops. The supermarkets are a very good source as well since they keep their cheeses properly and high turnover ensures good freshness for the younger cheeses.

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Blue de causses. Very local, very sharp.

I think my love affair with cheese started in the early 60’s when I first visited & lived in France. I didn’t know much, but I did know I liked all the cheeses I was offered. The only pre-France cheese I remember is Tillamook from Oregon. (My grandparents lived in Eugene) When I returned to Europe in 1967 we first lived in Brussels where good cheese was readily available and then when we moved to England I began to learn more about British cheeses. Unfortunately that time was a low spot in British cheese history so really good cheeses were difficult to find. Fortunately, I was visiting France on a regular basis so could buy there. I used to try to always plan a little shopping time into my business trips so I could take back cheeses, pates and bread to England.

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Another blue, St Augur. Mellow & nutty. Commercial, but good.

When I moved back to the states in 1982 I lived in Emeryville, California for a while; this was only a stone’s throw from Shattuck Avenue & foodie heaven. Alice Water’s Chez Panisse, Pig by the Tail, Monterey Market and, above all, the Cheese Place all in one block just about. The Saturday ritual was charcuterie, cheese, then lunch upstairs at Chez Panisse. There was hardly anywhere else to buy good, well kept cheeses so even after I moved I made the pilgrimage to Berkley on a regular basis. 1988 saw me back in England. I was in Newbury so I could easily get up to Streatly & Wells Stores. A lot of people, including me, believe that Patrick Rance was THE key figure in the resurrection of English cheese. Certainly his shop was a delight; full of the best cheeses both English & French all in perfect condition. His book on French cheeses is a must have for anyone serious about French cheese.

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A pallet of cabeques. Goat milk & made within 5 miles of Parisot.

’93 and back to the states. Berkley cheese still going, a good cheese shop in Carmel and that was about it. Moved to Chicago which was a cheese desert, even the WholeFoods wasn’t very good. Rhode Island next where the Providence WholeFoods was excellent. Thus we survived and did Ok until we moved to France permanently in 2002.

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Lunch! Note the crisp bread instead of regular bread. My concession the keeping my weight down.

For the past 5 years I’ve been fully able to indulge myself. I’ve learned about a lot of new (to me) cheeses and am still finding & trying new ones all the time. We make frequent visits to the UK to see friends & family so I’m also getting up to speed on their excellent spectrum of cheeses.

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Cheese labels from the really good cheese shop in Villefranche de Rouergue.

I’ve spread some pictures throughout this in no particular order just to liven it up. Most are from past posts or my blog. All are good cheeses.

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Tomme fermier. The real thing. There are a lot of bad tommes out there.

My advice to anyone concerning cheese is to keep tasting, keep experimenting and keep trying to find good vendors who know how to treat their product properly.

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St Felicien. A great favourite. This one was really ripe and extra delicious.

#86 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 05:49 AM

Here's how to make the tarte Tatin we are having for dessert tonight.

Ingredients:

6-8 apples. Granny Smith's by my choice. Others like Golden Delicious
1 Lemon
11/2 cups sugar
3 oz butter (unsalted)
Enough pie dough (pate brisée) to cover an 8 inch frying pan.

Method: (pre-heat oven to 425 F (220C )

1) Make your crust & put it into the fridge.
2) take the zest off the lemon & put it & the juice from the lemon into a large bowl with 1/2 cup of the sugar.

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3) Core, peel and cut each apple into 1/8ths. Immediately put them into the bowl with the sugar & lemon. Stir to cover.
4) Put the rest of the sugar & the butter into the frying pan. Over high heat melt the butter & sugar, stirring frequently. It will start to bubble and turn brown. Keep going.
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5) The mixture will start to separate. Don't panic. Keep going until the mix just begins to smoke. Take off of the heat.

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6) Now start layering the apples into the pan. VERY CAREFULLY. Its hot. Do two layers as shown.

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7) Put back on the high heat & cook, basting frequently, until the apples soften (about 15 minutes) Covering with a lid between basting's helps.

8) Get your crust out of the fridge & roll it out to a diameter that is at least 1 inch more than the pan diameter.

9) Turn the heat off. Fold the crust in half and place over the apples. Trim the edge all around then gently push the crust just inside the pan. Prick a few holes to let steam out.
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10) Put in the hot oven near the top. As you can see I have a pan with a removable handle. Otherwise a pan with a handle that will take the heat or you can almost close the door to the oven and leave the handle sticking out.
Cook until the crust is brown. A test for doneness is to gently tilt the pan to one side; if you see lots of juice run to the lower side its not done yet.

11) Take the pie out of the oven HOT HOT HOT!! Again tilt the pan. If the juices still look a bit runny even though the crust is brown put the pan back on high stovetop heat for a while until the juices are thicker.

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12) On this pie I was a bit quick. I should have let it brown a bit more. Also, even though the juices didn't run much on the tilt test I should have cooked the pie a bit more.

13) Here's the tricky part. Put a plate over the top of the pie then quickly turn it over.

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As you can see the juice is somewhat runny and the pie top should be browner. It will still taste great, but I would have liked a better example for the blog. C'est la vie!

Picture of the finished pie later.

#87 gariotin

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 05:55 AM

Dave, as always, the cheese pix and comments are so inspiring. Thanks for the wonderful reminders of what we are missing - even tho the selection and quality of French cheeses is so much better here in the States, we are missing the "real deal" of raw milk soft-ripeneds and chevres. That St. Felician is a beaut!
The little Whole Foods in Providence hearkens back to the "old days" when the chain was called Bread & Circus. It is still a wonderful little store and does an amazing job merchandising lots of delicious products in such a little space.
I am really enjoying your blog and had to laugh remembering that I once offended you by mistaking the avatar pix of Rupert for a rabbit!!

#88 Dave Hatfield

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 05:59 AM

Recipe for ailiade de Toulouse:  yes, I'm asking.  Please!

The dinner looks terrific.  I didn't see anything that had looked molded or clamped.  I didn't see any free-standing terrines or cheesecakes that looked like they'd been molded in a collar of parchment paper held in shape by that clamp.  I'm still thinking. 

This might be one of the best ways even to develop new uses for old stuff, eh?  :laugh:

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I haven't forgotten. Here is the recipe:

This is a sauce made locally here in the Rouergue and which is a traditional addition to magret. I first learned of it from Jeanne Strang's book "Goose Fat & Garlic". I highly recommend this book by the way. If you like the Paula Wolfert book on South Western French cooking you'll also love this book. In addition to the recipes Jeanne describes a way of life that continues in this area, but is slowly fading away.

NOTES:The recipe quantity will serve 4-5 people, but I have discovered that the Aillade freezes beautifully so I usually at least double up & keep a nice pot for next time.
Use walnut oil if at all possible. I've used olive oil & even truffle oil when I didn't have walnut & although they work well its just not quite the same.

Ingredients:

75 grams fresh walnuts
50 grams raw garlic
150 milliliter walnut oil
Salt & pepper
A small handful of Parsley
Some water.

Method:

1. Mix the walnuts & garlic together and process in a food processor or blender until very smooth. You may need to add a bit of water to keep the mixture flowing, but not too much. ( the traditional method was to do this step in a mortar & pestle, but the food processor is much easier.)
2. With the processor running, slowly pour in the walnut oil. Process until the Aillade is nicely smooth. If necessary add a little water until you achieve a mayonnaise like consistency.
3. Add salt & pepper to taste.
4. Add the parsley.
5. Serve with magret or place into a ramekin, seal with film & freeze.

I know this sounds very garlicky & strong, but believe me it offsets the duck beautifully. My wife always insists on Lyonaise potatoes with this so she can eat more Aillade.

#89 Jean Blanchard

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 06:20 AM

Dave,

Great blog! I will be in Provence and Paris in September so I am particularly enjoying it.

The cheeses look wonderful. Chicago now has a very good cheese shop that I travel from the suburbs for an hour to get to. Nothing as good as France, of course, but still better than what was previously available to us. Since I was French in another life and am living vicariously through you, can we see more of your home?

Jean Blanchard

#90 Marlene

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Posted 05 July 2007 - 06:36 AM

Dave, I love tart tatin, and now I need to try your recipe! I notice you are making it ahead. Do you serve it cold, or re warm it for service?
Marlene
cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.
Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.





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