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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 2)


daveb
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6 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

I noticed that too. I washed the jars in the dishwasher last night, and they still had a thin layer of egg on them in several spots. I tried scrubbing this morning but that wasn't enough. I had to scrub, soak, scrub, soak, etc to get rid of the remaining egg.

 

Why not a disposable vessel like a plastic cup?

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2 hours ago, gfweb said:

 

Why not a disposable vessel like a plastic cup?

Because of the environment, you know... I am trying to avoid using disposable things whenever I can.

 

Lining the glass jar would be, I fear, more trouble than cleaning it. I think that a bit of oil, as @blue_dolphinsuggested, might solve the issue.

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9 hours ago, weedy said:

it's my (formerly) British sarcasm; no negative implied. at least not seriously!

 

basically it seems to be rather like a sous vide coddled egg.

 

 

 

Whew!  So glad. :smile:

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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15 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

I had one of the leftovers for breakfast this AM.  I wanted to pop it out of the glass jar for quicker heating and found it much more difficult to get it out.  Also a pain to scrub the egg out of the jar so I'll repeat my recommendation to grease the jars first.  

Once out, it reheated nicely in the CSO for 6 min @ 350degF on steam bake.   

I'll try again to see if I can get a softer texture.  I used cream cheese as in the Anova recipe and will try cream or milk instead.   My result -both fresh cooked and reheated - was OK but the texture was kinda like something I'd get on a plane or maybe pick up from an airport Starbucks (surprise, surprise xD)

 

Have not tried yet but with all the experts here I am betting between us we can do better than "airport" food. @weedy mentioned chawanmushi so I am thinking that milk or cream or, with the appropriate fillings even dashi, one might soften the texture. May have a go myself today. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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20 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

Because of the environment, you know... I am trying to avoid using disposable things whenever I can.

 

Lining the glass jar would be, I fear, more trouble than cleaning it. I think that a bit of oil, as @blue_dolphinsuggested, might solve the issue.

I buttered the jars I used at work the other day - still a bit of cleanup but nothing too major. I'll unpack the next one tomorrow and see how it has fared.

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Chicken breasts in Stubbs brand citrus and onion marinade. 147 F for 3.25 hours, then a quick sear. Red skin mashed potatoes and a yet-to-be-named veggie. Also SVing a couple of pork loin chops for a future meal for just my DW and me.

 

ETA: Oops. Can't make mashed potatoes without potatoes. Seasoned brown rice will stand in for the potatoes.

Edited by Porthos (log)
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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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A while back I had ten chicken thighs to deal with, so I ate two and bagged up eight and pasteurized them.  Tonight I am preparing to serve the first of the eight thighs and I noticed there was little or no osmosome in the bag.  I attribute this to pasteurizing at 57 deg C (per Baldwin) rather than at the higher temperatures I have used before.  If the juice is not in the bag I assume the juice is in the chicken.

 

We shall see how this turns out.

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Just now, JoNorvelleWalker said:

A while back I had ten chicken thighs to deal with, so I ate two and bagged up eight and pasteurized them.  Tonight I am preparing to serve the first of the eight thighs and I noticed there was little or no osmosome in the bag.  I attribute this to pasteurizing at 57 deg C (per Baldwin) rather than at the higher temperatures I have used before.  If the juice is not in the bag I assume the juice is in the chicken.

 

We shall see how this turns out.

Osmosome?

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6 minutes ago, FrogPrincesse said:

Osmosome?

The odd, dark meaty juice that appears in the bag when sous-viding meat.  It isn't the light golden or dark golden color one would get if, say, roasting or poaching. 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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57 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

A while back I had ten chicken thighs to deal with, so I ate two and bagged up eight and pasteurized them.  Tonight I am preparing to serve the first of the eight thighs and I noticed there was little or no osmosome in the bag.  I attribute this to pasteurizing at 57 deg C (per Baldwin) rather than at the higher temperatures I have used before.  If the juice is not in the bag I assume the juice is in the chicken.

 

We shall see how this turns out.

 

Was going to ask the same thing as @FrogPrincesse asked, above. Google failed me. I have learned something new today. It is a successful day.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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I confess I first picked the term up from the prose of @Kerry Beal but google has usage back to at least 1841.  There is however no entry for "osmosome" in my copy of the O.E.D.  If one combines "osomo" with "some" it makes more sense.

 

Oddly blood and lymph and possibly other juices are pouring out of my left arm at the moment.

 

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1 hour ago, gfweb said:

Tourniquet and MR @JoNorvelleWalker 

 

No shortage of wine here, though my MR was last night.  When I posted I was wearing a crimson colored flannel shirt and sitting at the computer in a crimson colored chair, so all is good.  I have a medical condition that I tend to leak a good amount of osmosome, mainly from my legs.  Not all the time but about three cups a day last time I measured.  Might make a tasty stock.

 

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Actually the pasteurized chicken came out pretty good.  I tried something new.  I cooked the chicken thigh in the CSO for an hour on steam bake at 300 deg F, as specified in the CSO manual.

 

Though I do think broiling or steam baking at higher temperature is preferable.  Ideally I'd like to have the shatteringly crisp skin I can get with steam baked raw chicken in the CSO from chicken I have pasteurized sous vide.

 

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Attempting Eggbites this morning.  Eggs, diced orange peppers and manchego, into the bath at 170f.   First one in popped immediately and I had tempered the jars briefly before immersing.   Had this happen when I made creme brûlée which is why I tempered.   While the fresh water reheated I tempered the remaining 3 longer.   Pretty sure I didn't over tighten the lids but the last three were barely finger tip tight.  So breakfast will be a little later

 

image.jpeg

Edited by scubadoo97 (log)
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Hmmm. Did nothing to allay my fears. :o

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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