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Dinner 2015 (Part 3)


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JoNorvelleWalker:

 

Here's the ingredients, and my interpretation of Green Goddess Dressing from the 1968 edition of the "Better Homes and Gardens" cookbook:

 

1-1/2 c mayonnaise

1/4 c finely snipped chives

2 TBS tarragon vinegar

2 TBS snipped parsley

1 TBS crushed tarragon

4 anchovy fillets

1 green onion, finely snipped

 

All ingredients are mixed together, per the recipe, but get this:

 

This enormous amount of dressing (to me) is supposed to be put on only:

 

6 c romaine

3 c curly endive

9 oz pkg frozen artichoke hearts

1/2 c pitted ripe olives

2 oz. can rolled anchovy fillets

2 med. tomatoes cut into wedges (optional)

 

Which is enough salad to feed a small army, but to me, it would still be way too much dressing for the amount to be dressed.

 

 

From the 1976 "Betty Crocker Cookbook":

 

1 clove garlic, crushed

3 TBS anchovy paste or finely chopped anchovy fillets

3 TBS finely snipped chives

1 TBS lemon juice

3 TBS tarragon wine vinegar

1/2 c dairy sour cream

1 c mayonnaise or salad dressing

1/3 c finely snipped parsley

1/4 t salt

1/8 t freshly ground pepper

 

Mix it all up, and chill to allow flavors to blend.

 

This is a very good dressing that has fallen out of mainstream favor. 

 

I've made it several times before, using dried tarragon and regular vinegar. My advice is to use Italian flatleaf parsley like in the last recipe from Betty. Plenty of fresh herbs, of course is the intent and essence of this dressing, so if you can find all of them, including the tarragon, that's the route you should go.

 

It is very delicious, and Bon Appetit!

 

Many thanks!

 

This joins the Joy of Cooking version and a recent recipe from Steven Satterfield that I photocopied.  I saw another in the past few days but it was so similar to Satterfield's that I didn't bother with it.

 

Now all I have to do is find the herbs and make it.  I wish I were growing tarragon this summer.

 

 

Edit:  maybe Kim will still share hers?

Edited by JoNorvelleWalker (log)
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Ooo- I like the idea of mushroom with artichoke.Will give it a try.

There was also thyme, garlic, S&P,  and literally 2 drops of soy in the mix as I sauteed it prior  to stuffing

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SV halibut, greens and lightly pickled beets

 

 

I love this kind of meal. Any tips on the halibut sous-vide? I live in halibut country but haven't tried it sous-vide yet, only because I am still new to SV and I keep getting sidetracked with other foods! 

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Fresh (wild, local) sockeye salmon cooked sous vide and then quickly seared after brushing with a teriyaki-type sauce (Tamari soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, brown sugar, powdered ginger and garlic). Lovely local snap peas from an organic farm just north of here + red pepper from a local greenhouse + some canned water chestnuts. We had a crazy busy day today and this was fast food! We dined quite late out on the deck and even Mijo (kitty in the avatar image) joined in for a little bit of salmon. 

 

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Edited by FauxPas (log)
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Soupy sauce of fresh tomatoes, sliced green garlic, chopped Tuscan kale, Arbosana EV olive oil.  Seasoned to taste.  Angel hair pasta [De Cecco].

DSCN5124a_800.jpg

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FP  what are your SV times and temp for the salmon.

 

BTW gfweb also the times and temps for the halibut

 

I might start doing this as i have a decent frozen source

 

not bulk as is my practice.

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FP  what are your SV times and temp for the salmon.

 

BTW gfweb also the times and temps for the halibut

 

I did the salmon at 55C for about 40 mins. It was a fairly thick piece. I might even go a bit lower temp next time, because I like a good sear and it's easy to overcook the salmon during that part. Although tonight's fish was still quite moist inside. Absolutely no complaints. And the cat really liked it. Heh.   :smile:

 

I'd also like to know gfweb's times and temps!   

Edited by FauxPas (log)
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chicken pie.JPG

 

This should have been good, but wasn't. I had leftover roast chicken, and made a crust of grated russet potatoes, grated onion, an egg and some crumbs (as if I were making latkes). Pressed that into a pie plate, and baked it until the edges were lightly browned. Put the chopped chicken and some chopped asparagus in a cream sauce (cream cheese, milk, grated Parm) and added some tarragon.

 

Either my tarragon is nuclear strength tarragon, or I used too much. It overpowered the entire dish. I only used about a tablespoon, minced.

 

But any of you Green Goddess dressing devotees, if you can tell me how to send you tarragon, I have a gracious plenty of it.

 

squash casserole.JPG

 

This, however, was quite excellent. A simple squash casserole -- yellow crookneck squash and sweet onion, cut up and steamed lightly, then mixed with egg, milk, grated cheddar, cracker crumbs, salt and pepper, spooned into a casserole dish, topped with more cheese and crumbs, and baked. Very simple, very good.

Edited by kayb (log)
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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Nina--I wish my husband liked sardines...your pissaladière looks delightfully yummy.

 

Anna--Mushroom ragu.  I could dive headfirst into that pasta

 

Gfweb--Lovely steak and I want a stuffed 'shroom.

 

FauxPas--I've got to get some salmon.  Yours looks wonderful.  And your furry baby is adorable.

 

Kay--I planted tarragon for the first time ever.  It's just languishing in my garden because I don't know what to do with it lol.  Your chicken dish looks good.....I like the idea of the potato crust.  I'm sorry it didn't taste good.

 

WE HAVE A TRIPLE CROWN WINNER!!!!   I teared up at the beginning of the race and then I bawled like a baby when American Pharoah won.  Simply one of the best days of my life.

 

To celebrate my husband fried me some chicken.  My plate looks a little sparse here....but it was really good.  

 

photo.JPG

Edited by Shelby (log)
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A very, very late night / early morning meal.

 

Pan-fried pork Schnecken [Claus'].  Halved baby zucchini sautéed in the pan residues & oil.  Leftover angel hair pasta tossed in the pan (after doing the zucchini) w/ a little more evoo plus some chopped smashed garlic & chopped summer savory, with halved zucchini blossoms added in at the last; lightly salted; plated w/ additional sprigs of summer savory.

 

DSCN5137a_800.jpg

DSCN5132b_800.jpg

 

 

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image.jpg

A different take on a BLT inspired by Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall's book Three Good Things.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Fresh (wild, local) sockeye salmon cooked sous vide and then quickly seared after brushing with a teriyaki-type sauce (Tamari soy sauce, rice wine vinegar, brown sugar, powdered ginger and garlic). Lovely local snap peas from an organic farm just north of here + red pepper from a local greenhouse + some canned water chestnuts. We had a crazy busy day today and this was fast food! We dined quite late out on the deck and even Mijo (kitty in the avatar image) joined in for a little bit of salmon. 

 

attachicon.gifIMGP4399.JPG

 

attachicon.gifIMGP4401.JPG

Beautiful. The cat, too. 

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Tonight's dinner was at Bosphorus restaurant here in Cary. It specializes in Turkish food and is owned by a Turkish family. We went with our friend from Turkey who was chattering away with the waiter in Turkish even before we  were seated. It's in a strip mall, but manages to be a very attractive and comfortable place to eat with fresh live flowers inside and out, stonework and art with deeply padded spacious booths like the one we were seated in.

 

We started with the complimentary and delicious freshly baked sesame pide bread, which is different than the pita bread I am more used to. This is served with an herbed and spiced tomato oil for dipping. We also ordered cigar bourek. These are cylinders of homemade phyllo rolled up around feta cheese and fried. These were really good too.

 

On Sundays only they make real doner available only between 4PM and 8PM when they close on Sundays. We were lucky enough to get some, as they frequently run out. Our friend and I got the doner platters, and my husband got the mixed grill which comes with chicken, lamb, adana, kafta kebabs and doner on Sundays or gyro meat every other day. All the platters come with a nice salad, herbed yogurt cucumber sauce and bulgar wheat pilaf. I knew I would love the pilaf, because I adore wheat berries. It was all wonderful.

 

We all also got Turkish tea which was very fragrant and good. I was happy to discover it comes unsweetened with sugar on the side as I don't care for overly sweet tea.

 

We all boxed up leftovers to take home, but I got an order of baklava to go. I could't leave without it because I've been looking forward to this for over a year. Haven't eaten any baklava yet, but judging from everything else I had, it will be excellent too.

 

Next time, I want to try the Turkish version of pizza that comes in an elongated bread boat.

 

Still no camera, so no photos, but here's a link to yelp with over 200 pictures including everything we ordered, for anyone who's interested:

 

http://www.yelp.com/biz/bosphorus-cary

 

Here's another link for those of you who may not know what doner is (like I didn't until recently) and may want to learn more. It's a giant hunk of meat cooked on a (usually) vertical rotating spit and then sliced off thinly for service.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=doner+cooking+images&espv=2&biw=1097&bih=546&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=phR1Ve-UI8misAXt_4PADw&ved=0CDwQ7Ak

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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(Earlier) Lotus leaf-wrapped glutinous rice w/ pork & shiitake mushrooms [commercial], steamed.

(Later) Pork & shrimp wontons [Prime Food]; with chiffonaded savoy cabbage (outer) leaves & green garlic in chicken broth w/ some extra oil added.

 

DSCN5138-41_C_800.jpg

 

Cooked in a separate pot of simmering water, then fished out with a sieve and added to the chicken broth & veggies when being bowled.  The water used to cook the wontons, containing excess and leached-out starch & flour etc, is discarded. (I almost always cook wontons and shui kow and dumplings etc separately from the soup they will be floating in subsequently. On the rare occasion when I cook them directly in the soup - due to laziness, say - I always regret it because the excess starch etc makes it gooey and also usually makes it murky with a "flour-y taste" – both not desired in something like wonton soup or shui kow soup.)

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Tonight, I did one of my favourites. I call them duck wraps.

Duck leg is slowly braised in Thai or Vietnamese fish sauce, Shaoxing wine, star anise, Sichuan pepper corns and dried tangerine peel, then allowed to cool a little.

 

The duck meat is then stripped from the bones and shredded before being piled onto these Chinese flat bread wraps, with lettuce, coriander (cilantro) scallions and cucumber. A splash of Tabasco green pepper sauce and it's rock 'n roll. I ate five.

 

dw.jpg

Ready to roll

 

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Rollin'

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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Kay--I planted tarragon for the first time ever.  It's just languishing in my garden because I don't know what to do with it lol.  Your chicken dish looks good.....I like the idea of the potato crust.  I'm sorry it didn't taste good.

 

WE HAVE A TRIPLE CROWN WINNER!!!!   I teared up at the beginning of the race and then I bawled like a baby when American Pharoah won.  Simply one of the best days of my life.

 

 

I love tarragon sauteed or steamed with any fresh green veggies, especially sugar snap peas and green beans. Also good with tomatoes, and corn. But in the event that you also have tarragon-on-steroids, start with a LITTLE BIT and work up!

 

And you KNOW I was happy about American Pharoah! He got a good start at Oaklawn!

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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