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Cook-Off 63: Summer Squash


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On 8/8/2019 at 8:28 AM, lemniscate said:

NATIONAL SNEAK SOME ZUCCHINI INTO YOUR NEIGHBOR’S PORCH DAY – August 8

https://nationaldaycalendar.com/national-sneak-some-zucchini-into-your-neighbors-porch-day-august-8/

 

how timely with this thread.....

Or if you are getting IV meds daily in the ER you sneak your zucchini into the triage room and leave them there when the admitting clerk leaves!

 

E3D4C614-CB7E-4EDE-8978-FF7A16F38913.thumb.jpeg.f6a3dc752dfaa89052315a2b34efbbb3.jpeg

 

 

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11 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Or if you are getting IV meds daily in the ER you sneak your zucchini into the triage room and leave them there when the admitting clerk leaves!

 

E3D4C614-CB7E-4EDE-8978-FF7A16F38913.thumb.jpeg.f6a3dc752dfaa89052315a2b34efbbb3.jpeg

 

 

See yours and raise you by 2/3.     My nephew arrived at a family party yesterday bearing a "gift" of a 30" x 3" zuch.    "Well, er, thanks you so much!"

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eGullet member #80.

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Zucchini ribbons shaved with vegetable peeler, marinated in salt/lime juice, dressed with olive oil, topped with kalamata olives, blue cheese, peppitas.  

221BF4B2-6CA3-44FD-99BE-7E8189B5DC56.thumb.jpeg.1f1b6895a731f6b2682730a049faa419.jpeg

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5 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

See yours and raise you by 2/3.     My nephew arrived at a family party yesterday bearing a "gift" of a 30" x 3" zuch.    "Well, er, thanks you so much!"

 

Why doesn't anyone give away little baby zucchini?

 

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5 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

Giant zucchini exist for one purpose now, to play with the KA vegetable sheeter .  

This thing looks fun.   It's on my "please Santa/Father Christmas/Hogfather" list.  

Bet someone handy - I'm looking at you, @dcarch - could rig something up with a hand planer - then you'd avoid the dreaded "unitasker" tool!

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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6 minutes ago, lemniscate said:

Giant zucchini exist for one purpose now, to play with the KA vegetable sheeter .  

This thing looks fun.   It's on my "please Santa/Father Christmas/Hogfather" list.  

(Mentally adds Lemniscate to the list of Known Pratchett Aficionados...)

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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15 hours ago, chefmd said:

Zucchini ribbons shaved with vegetable peeler, marinated in salt/lime juice, dressed with olive oil, topped with kalamata olives, blue cheese, peppitas.  

221BF4B2-6CA3-44FD-99BE-7E8189B5DC56.thumb.jpeg.1f1b6895a731f6b2682730a049faa419.jpeg

Since I sent the aforementioned giant (or baby) zucchini home with DS and DIL, I am sending them your photo as inspiration.    

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eGullet member #80.

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  • 10 months later...

Another one of our summer Cook-Off's at eGullet, Summer Squash.  Right now summer squash are growing in our home gardens and fill farmer's market stands.  Do you have any new summer sqaush dishes you'll be making this summer?

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@Shelby posted a squash carpacci earlier today - looks SO appealing if it ever gets hot here. https://forums.egullet.org/topic/160121-dinner-2020/?do=findComment&comment=2254651 David Lebovitz posted a zuke cake with crackly lemon frosting which I almost ignored as a child of the 70's  - no no no more zucchini bread. His looks good with the nuts and spices (recipe from the late great Gina dePalma)  https://www.davidlebovitz.com/zucchini-cake-with-crunchy-lemon/

 

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I just might try that zucchini cake.  I still have some nightmares over summer zucchini.  When I was in my early teens I worked for a local farmer harvesting his zucchini.  He actually was one of our junior high school teachers so we got him winter and summer! Granted that was in the early 70's, but the technique hasn't changed much.  He drove the tractor with a flatbed contraption that had large wood crate boxes on the back end.  We, as in about 8 of us, bent over with a big machete, cut the zucchini at the stem and just threw it up into the bins, without looking up.  Head to ground cutting zucchini add day wasn't much fun, but I suppose we made good money.   Anyway the two dishes above sound very delicious. 

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Someone asked why not give away the babes. In my experience those big bristly leaves hide them well. I turned the over gigantors into the Halloween decorations just like  Jack O' Lanterns. I tried  strudel with an oversize one and regretted it - flavorless. Actually that was a pattypan but same flavor profile though zukes are sweeter maybe?  

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I also worked in a cannery in the summers in the Willamette Valley in Oregon.  The market size zucchini we never saw, but we processed those huge zucchini into chopped frozen mix or pureed it for foodservice use.  Zuchinni frozen is terribly limp and I've never taken much to it.  The patty pan is also good roasted until soft and tossed with garlic and butter.

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Larger zucchini are good for stuffed prep, cut in half and scoop out the seeds. I have also grated and sauteed, cook for a while to get some of the excess water out, then add aromatics.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Just now, BeeZee said:

Larger zucchini are good for stuffed prep, cut in half and scoop out the seeds. I have also grated and sauteed, cook for a while to get some of the excess water out, then add aromatics.

I do like a fresh zucchini "pancake" sauteed like a potato pancake.

 

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I have been learning a lot about zucchini this year.  Everything from best ways to prune and tend to them to what else can be eaten!  We have always enjoyed the flowers, but I learned this year that the leaves are edible (and quite tasty/healthy) too!  Younger ones are preferred, no stalk, just leaves - a sautee with onions, garlic (I just did one with baby zucchini's, flowers and garlic scapes as well) finished off with some acid - really nice.

 

 

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50 minutes ago, David Ross said:

I do like a fresh zucchini "pancake" sauteed like a potato pancake.

 

 

Right - often the "lower calorie" latke  alternative as well.

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13 minutes ago, TicTac said:

I have been learning a lot about zucchini this year.  Everything from best ways to prune and tend to them to what else can be eaten!  We have always enjoyed the flowers, but I learned this year that the leaves are edible (and quite tasty/healthy) too!  Younger ones are preferred, no stalk, just leaves - a sautee with onions, garlic (I just did one with baby zucchini's, flowers and garlic scapes as well) finished off with some acid - really nice.

 

 

 

They must be really small to be edible - before the afore noted bristles emerge. So much is edible that we do not use.  There are lots of sites and books. Linda Ly has a new one https://www.gardenbetty.com/the-no-waste-vegetable-cookbook/

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2 hours ago, heidih said:

 

They must be really small to be edible - before the afore noted bristles emerge. So much is edible that we do not use.  There are lots of sites and books. Linda Ly has a new one https://www.gardenbetty.com/the-no-waste-vegetable-cookbook/

Contrary to what one would typically think (myself included), even larger mid size leaves are fine to eat.  Just like nettles, I suppose - the bristles break down completely upon contact with heat.  The spines of the leaves certainly retain their texture more than most leafy veg I have encountered.  It takes on a bit of a nutty taste when toasted in the pan.  And I am guessing it's good for me too 😛

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Hands down favorite zuke technique/recipe

 

3 cups grated zucchini, drain for 20 minutes in colander

1 sleeve Saltine (my children will tell you they must be Zesta or Nabisco) crackers, crushed

2 eggs, beaten

 

Stir together. Pan fry in 1/4 inch oil over medium high heat until golden on both sides. Drain on paper towel covered rack in a warm oven until time to eat.This will make about enough for four people, unless two of them are my children, in which case, two or three people. Any leftovers may be frozen and rewarmed in the CSO.

 

My girls would eat these three times a week if I'd cook them. Needs no other seasoning; just the salt on the crackers. You could serve with a dipping sauce if you wanted. Personally, I like them with sriracha mayo.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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12 hours ago, kayb said:

Hands down favorite zuke technique/recipe

 

3 cups grated zucchini, drain for 20 minutes in colander

1 sleeve Saltine (my children will tell you they must be Zesta or Nabisco) crackers, crushed

2 eggs, beaten

 

Stir together. Pan fry in 1/4 inch oil over medium high heat until golden on both sides. Drain on paper towel covered rack in a warm oven until time to eat.This will make about enough for four people, unless two of them are my children, in which case, two or three people. Any leftovers may be frozen and rewarmed in the CSO.

 

My girls would eat these three times a week if I'd cook them. Needs no other seasoning; just the salt on the crackers. You could serve with a dipping sauce if you wanted. Personally, I like them with sriracha mayo.

 

Wow thanks I'm definately going to try that recipe. 

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Last week, as reported over in the pizza toppings topic,  I used the classic slow-cooked summer squash & onions as a pizza sauce. 

For the squash, I followed Toni Tipton-Martin's recipe from Jubilee which uses butter, olive oil and rosemary.  When I tasted the sweetness of the cooked squash, my thoughts went to additions like feta, olives, preserved lemon but I wanted to stick with the southern theme, so I added red bell peppers and diced country ham. 

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