Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Bibimbap--Cook-off 14


Recommended Posts

Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.

For our fourteenth Cook-Off, we're making bibimbap.

gallery_19804_437_36785.jpg

Aficionados of Korean food and cooking are well aware of this famous dish, but many who have not had the pleasure might find this a surprising cook-off selection. Folks, I'm here to tell you that everyone should bring this remarkable dish into their repertoire.

What is bibimbap, you ask? In a previous thread devoted to the subject, Jinmyo offered this typically inimitable explanation:

To "bibim" is to "stir together" vegetable or meat toppings with boiled calrose rice ("bap"). There are innumberable varities of bibimbap but the most popular are perhaps those that use a dolsot or stone bowl which is heated on the burner until a few grains of rice dropped into it crackle. Fill the bowl about two thirds full of rice. Add kimchee, chopped scallion, deep fried tofu, some steamed greens or perhaps microgreens, some red chile powder or threads. Crack an egg on top or lay a very lightly fried egg atop. A sprinkle of gomasio is nice. You can mix gochujang chile paste into the vegetables or serve it on the side.

Carefully lift the very hot bowl and put it on the tray it was purchased with.

Now, bibim your bap.

Panchan or side dishes such as manduk (gyoza), japchae (vegetables with cellophane noodles), kimbap (maki of various kinds), and a few other kinds of kimchee such as kkakdugi (diced daikon kimchee) go nicely.

True, some ingredients (the pickles known as kimchee and the red pepper paste known as gojuchang) may be a bit tricky for you to find, but we can summon up some possible substitutes. No special equipment is absolutely necessary, though if you have one of the stone or metal cook bowls known as dolsots, you'll want to use that. Like cassoulet, bibimbap inspires many debates about authenticity and regionalism, which means that the neophyte can experiment with great flexibility and still claim some amount of technical merit! :biggrin:

Finally and as always, the eGullet Society is chock-a-block full of experts ready to share ideas and recipes for the various components of this dish, not only on the thread referenced above (click the little pink box in the quotation) but also here, here, and here, with a kimchee thread here and a kochuchang thread here. So turn on your rice cookers and get your beef a-marinating -- and if you have any soju handy, get it damned cold!

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome. To get the party started, here is one in a dolsot

gallery_8505_1301_69921.jpg

gallery_8505_1301_19561.jpg

I'll be interested to hear about the uber-traditional components as well as the more common ones. I've had this dish many times in NYC Korean restaurants, and will admit to being surprised to read in these forums that an "authentic bibimbap" is supposed to have certain ingredients, since I've had it in so many different variations.

--

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mmmm....can't wait to see pictures. Bibimbap is one of my all time favorite meals!

Kathy

Cooking is like love. It should be entered into with abandon or not at all. - Harriet Van Horne

Link to comment
Share on other sites

will there be recipes included? my gf loves bimibap and I'd love to make it for her..

Deadheads are kinda like people who like licorice. Not everybody likes licorice, but people who like licorice, *really* like licorice!

-Jerry Garcia

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got a question:

How important is the dolsot to the success of the bibimbap?

I think I already know the answer - I've tried making bibimbap in an iron skillet, and it was OK but just not quite "right".

I'm going to look for a dolsot at the asian grocery in Cleveland next time I'm there. In the mean time, am I wasting my time with the iron skillet?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've got a question:

How important is the dolsot to the success of the bibimbap?

I think I already know the answer - I've tried making bibimbap in an iron skillet, and it was OK but just not quite "right".

I'm going to look for a dolsot at the asian grocery in Cleveland next time I'm there. In the mean time, am I wasting my time with the iron skillet?

You don't need it all, plenty of variations on bibimbap are served in just regular bowls. I never use a dolsot at home and I rarely order that version in restaurants as I prefer te non-dolsot version.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

But isn't it the dolsot which makes the rice at the bottom all crispy? I love that part of this dish.

That wouldn't make it essential, of course, but it would perhaps be a good motivating force for people to try and find a substitute. Can this dish be done with some other kind of stone bowl?

Jon Lurie, aka "jhlurie"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My understanding is that dolsot bibimbap is merely an extra (albeit very nice) twist on the basic bibimbap recipe. Hence the designation dolsot. Sometimes I'm in the mood for dolsot, sometimes I just want it plain. (Especially when it's hot out.)

You can get some crispy rice by making rice in a pot the persian way so that it develops a crust. It's a cheat, but good if you don't feel like acquiring a bunch of extra bowls...

Lucky for me, there are a bunch of places near my department that serve it for lunch. :wink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My understanding is that dolsot bibimbap is merely an extra (albeit very nice) twist on the basic bibimbap recipe.

This is what I always thought too. here in Japan the non-dolsot version is by far the more popular. Some places will offer both though. I guess I prefer it more at room temperature, the dolsot version are always too hot to eat. :angry:

When I make it at home I even let teh rice cool down a bit in the bowls before I top it.

Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've also found that you can get the desired effect with a non-stick skillet. Heat it on medium-high, add a tablespoon or two of peanut oil, and then add a thick layer of cooked rice right from the machine. Shake the skillet repeatedly, especially during the first few minutes, and check the bottom occasionally; when it's a bit brown in spots, you'll get that crunchy layer, and you can slide the whole sheebang into your big bowl for the rest of the goodies.

Speaking of which: does anyone want to offer a recipe?

Chris Amirault

eG Ethics Signatory

Sir Luscious got gator belts and patty melts

Link to comment
Share on other sites

don't let my mom see this thread. she'll send you all threatening pm's about how your assimilation of korean food is destroying our culture.

i'm actualy going over to my aprents this thanksgiving for dinner. i think we're having bibimbap. i'll try and get some photos.

and just to clarify dolsot is just one type of bibimbap. dolsot is 2 words. dol (rock) and sot (bowl or container). so dolsot bibimbap is bibimbap served in a stone bowl but just bibimbap is bibimbap in a normal bowl. there's also gkook bibimbap which is basically bibimbap with a little soup or broth poured into it

jhlurie, you can use a small cast iron skillet to get that crispy affect.

chris as far as recipes go i think the base is basically the rice, a sunny side up egg (or raw egg if you're making dolsot bibimbap), and you gojujang (hot bean paste), and then a mixture of vegetable (marinated preferably) and some bool goki (beef marinated in soy sauce). my mom usually adds marinated bean sprouts, marinated spinach, spicy pickled daikon radish, julienne carrots, marinated fiddle heads and marinated zucchini. even if you're not having gook bibimbap, it's typical to have some soup with it. usually teng jang (sorta like korean style miso) soup.

Edited by chef koo (log)

bork bork bork

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never had bibimbap, but it does look very pretty and I would love to try it.

Questions!

It seems that with a dish like this, it is very important how all the different elements taste. I think Torakris mentioned in another thread that all the vegetables need to be seasoned and marinated seperately. Are there any recipes for that?

I can get kimchi (jarred or in a can) in my toko, not sure about the kochuchang (which seems to spelled differently in every post :smile: ) What is that (so that I know what to look for?)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bibimbap is one of my favorite Korean foods (among several). I won't be participating in this cookoff in the foreseeable future, but I'm already enjoying the photos and discussion, and I might go to a good New York Korean restaurant and take photos of the bibimbap there at some point. My subjective point of view is that it's very important to mix all the ingredients well, and that some crispy rice is essential to a fully satisfying experience. Then again, I'm not familiar with gkook bibimbap. Chef Koo, does that also include some crispy rice?

Michael aka "Pan"

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

chufi the seasoning and marinading of the vegetables is different for all the vegetables but basically look it in the way of a sandwich. there's a recipe for mayonaise, there's a recipe for the ham, the mustard so on and so forth. and for alomost all those elements they can be readily made and bought at a market. same with the elements of bibimbap. but if you can't find it basically lightly cook the vegetables and cool them down. then marinade them in salt, finely chopped green onion, sesame seeds and a tiny bit of sesame oil. and don't worry about the spelling. it's a korean word so spelt in english, as long as it fo-in-eh-tically spelt it's fine.

pan it can be crispy depending on wether it's dolsot bibimbap or not. as long as it has a little soup or broth poured on it it's gook bibimbap

Edited by chef koo (log)

bork bork bork

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but if you can't find it basically lightly cook the vegetables and cool them down. then marinade them in salt, finely chopped green onion, sesame seeds and a tiny bit of sesame oil.

So, if I'm understanding correctly, the rice is served hot and the vegetables are cold? What about the beef?

Another question - about the rice.

What kind of rice should I use and what's the preferred method of cooking it? The only rice I have in the house is basmati, and risotto rice - I presume I need something else for this :smile:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

but if you can't find it basically lightly cook the vegetables and cool them down. then marinade them in salt, finely chopped green onion, sesame seeds and a tiny bit of sesame oil.

So, if I'm understanding correctly, the rice is served hot and the vegetables are cold? What about the beef?

Another question - about the rice.

What kind of rice should I use and what's the preferred method of cooking it? The only rice I have in the house is basmati, and risotto rice - I presume I need something else for this :smile:

The vegetables are room temp, the beef should be hot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

How is the beef cooked? Is this dish a candidate for leftover meat?

It depends on the household, but in my mom's house she just seasoned with pepper soy sauce and sugar and stir fried it up fast. And you can definitely use this dish as a vehicle for leftover meat.

If any of you people live near a Korean market you can do the lazy thing I do, and just buy prepackaged bibimbap veggies and they'll have a little plastic container of preseasoned kochujang in it along with the veggies. Also, you can just buy premade bulgogi and fry it up at home in a cast iron skillet.

In this pic you can see the prepackaged bibimbap veggies that was talking about on the lower right hand side.

IMG_1633.jpg

Also, if you have leftover veggies from your bibimbap adventure, you can make kimbap, which is basically just bibimbap rolled in nori.

IMG_1640.jpg

Believe me, I tied my shoes once, and it was an overrated experience - King Jaffe Joffer, ruler of Zamunda

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Awesome.  To get the party started, here is one in a dolsot

gallery_8505_1301_69921.jpg

gallery_8505_1301_19561.jpg

I'll be interested to hear about the uber-traditional components as well as the more common ones.  I've had this dish many times in NYC Korean restaurants, and will admit to being surprised to read in these forums that an "authentic bibimbap" is supposed to have certain ingredients, since I've had it in so many different variations.

What looks like bell peppers and asparagus are not traditional at all. There are regional variations in the ingredients. The most "famous" bibimbap is from Jeon Ju where my mother is from and it's also considered the best region for food in South Korea. And yes, my mother's cooking is very pretty like those photos.

In Korea there are restaurants that specialize in bibimbap that adhere to regional presentations which means using local ingredients. There are also restaurants more general restaurants that add whatever. Generally the idea is to go for a range of colors, flavors and textures. Some sauteed vegetables, some naemul, etc..

I prefer to eat at Korean restaurants that specialize in just a few dishes, rather than more general ones.

At home people add whatever they want, even stuff like spam. In my mother's home unless it has at least 5-6 vegetables it's not bibimbap, it 's "bab bi byuh mugh uh"

Seoul is not considered to have a regional style of cooking. It's a city of people from allover Korea. There's a joke that Seoul home cooking is basically buying premade/packaged stuff and ordering in.

One of my favorite versions is yukwe bibimbap with Korean steak tartare with a raw egg yolk as shown in the link.

Edited by touaregsand (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a slightly OT question for Touaregsand and others who have been to Korea: Are there any modern variations or new twists on the traditional bibimbap that have gained popularity in Korea recently? For instance, using other meats or non-traditional ingredients?

This is the type of information that is hard to find for those of using not living in Korea.

TIA

Edited by sanrensho (log)
Baker of "impaired" cakes...
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our seventh Cook-Off, due to an overwhelming campaign by a lurking group of Greek cuisine fans, we're going to be making mousssaka. And listen up: y'all have some work to do!
      When it comes to moussaka, it's all Greek to me! I cannot find a single solid lead on an eGullet thread concerning moussaka. In addition, I cannot find a recipe for moussaka in RecipeGullet. Finally, I've never had nor cooked this dish, and the only cookbook I have that includes it (our own Paula Wolfert's great book on The Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean) is explicitly non-traditional.
      So, as in any decent democracy in the wake of a power-shift, the reigns must now be handed over to you, my moussaka-loving friends, to guide us through the pleasures of this fine dish. Tell us, what exactly is it? What produced your eager advocacy? How does it address the cook-off criteria? What are its classic forms? What links might guide us? What recipes do you use? What techniques can we learn?
      Info! Photos! Opinions! Sing, Goddesses!!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...