Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Cook-Off 63: Summer Squash


Recommended Posts

Have you tried stuffing them with crab? That's my personal favorite.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Delicious 2

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I've done three new to us dishes with squash this last week.  As Heidi mentioned, I did a squash carpaccio --yellow squash, basil, sea salt, lemon juice, olive oil, pine nuts and shaved parm. cheese

 

thumbnail_IMG_7947.jpg.d83ce0ab18fd01d1d55e30e07f228905.jpg

 

Flatbread with yellow squash--dough baked with a basil pesto and mozz. cheese then lay the squash on the warm crust along with prosciutto and red pepper flakes

 

thumbnail_IMG_7946.jpg.558b25c525a07df6cb00ee270dd4b8d0.jpg

 

And last night I did a casserole.  Cook down a chopped onion and about 3-4 yellow squash along with some salt until tender.  Drain, add some butter, pepper and more salt.  Mash with a potato masher.  Add a cup of sour cream and a can of cream of chicken soup.  Stir in two cups of stuffing mix.  Pour into dish sprayed with non stick spray.  Sprinkle one more cup of stuffing mix on the top and then sprinkle with shredded cheddar cheese.  Bake at 350F for about 30 mins.  You could do up old socks like this and it would still taste good lol.

 

Casserole on the plate at 6:00

 

thumbnail_IMG_7951.jpg.4ad56e6f746bb7caa97d6ac85063384a.jpg

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites

Creamed pattipan (or any summer squash) is a decent side dish.   Grate and drain squashes.    Mix some flour into sour cream.    Saute grated squash until cooked through, then add sour cream and a hefty amount of dry or fresh dill.    Cook until all is slightly thickened.

  • Like 2

eGullet member #80.

Link to post
Share on other sites

When I lived in NM in the sixties and seventies you couldn't go to a potluck without tripping over a zucchini casserole. These days, once a summer, when yellow squash looks good at the farmers' market, I might do the following: saute onion or shallot in butter, add lots of minced garlic. Then add sliced summer squash, cilantro, roasted green chiles, cherry tomatoes, whole or halved, salt and pepper and coat briefly. Transfer to a casserole dish. Bake for 35 or 35 minutes. Remove and switch oven to broil. Top with grated cheese like Oaxaca, broil until melted. Very forgiving,  Fresh corn on the cob is a perfect side. 

 

With zucchini I most likely will make some kind of fritters. Zucchini and Kohlrabi grated together makes a pretty good fritter along with the usual suspects, eggs and flour and lots of chives or fresh dill. I admit I don't go out of my way to buy summer squash. And I don't have gardening friends nowadays. See @Margaret Pilgrim's confession upthread. So much packed into one little sentence!

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 weeks later...

Using Paul P’s gumbo recipe as a guide I made gumbo with Andouille sausage, okra and zucchini.  Smells delicious.  No picture because a pot of bubbling gumbo is not pretty.

  • Like 1
  • Delicious 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Love zucchini bread, as I do it's cousin, zucchini cake!

 

Slightly off topic, but I am curious if anyone has had issues with their squash/zucchini plants this year - all of a sudden all of mine (different varietals) within the span of 2 weeks, went form vigorous large plants to wilted and dead. 

 

Zucrona Virus!?

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, TicTac said:

Love zucchini bread, as I do it's cousin, zucchini cake!

 

Slightly off topic, but I am curious if anyone has had issues with their squash/zucchini plants this year - all of a sudden all of mine (different varietals) within the span of 2 weeks, went form vigorous large plants to wilted and dead. 

 

Zucrona Virus!?

 

 

Check the gardening topic or Margaret The link is to a tomato discussion also links to good sites https://awaytogarden.com/late-blight-and-tomato-diseases-with-dr-meg-mcgrath/

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, TicTac said:

Love zucchini bread, as I do it's cousin, zucchini cake!

 

Slightly off topic, but I am curious if anyone has had issues with their squash/zucchini plants this year - all of a sudden all of mine (different varietals) within the span of 2 weeks, went form vigorous large plants to wilted and dead. 

 

Zucrona Virus!?

 

 

 

13 hours ago, kayb said:

Mine did the same. Dunno whats up with that.

When mine do that it's always squash bugs.  Nasty creatures.  Check the underside of leaves for eggs.  

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...
22 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

You can't get simpler than braising zucchini in a boatload of butter, then whirring the mess into a puree.    I could eat this for dessert!

 

Sure it is delicious to your taste - every body is different. The beauty of being a cook - you make to your taste. To me butter obscures but as said - that is me. I am also the one who cringes at cold shredded cheese and sour cream on "tacos". I bite my tongue because I am not you and if you like it  - cool.

  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
33 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

You can't get simpler than braising zucchini in a boatload of butter, then whirring the mess into a puree.    I could eat this for dessert!

 

Lemme know if you're making this for dessert...so I can go to Humphry Slocombe.

  • Haha 3

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

After putting number 8 and 9 zucchini in the fridge I wondered aloud “ can one make a breakfast zucchini crisp?”

 

I put them in a phyllo dough strudel and use plenty of warm spices. Enjoyed at the party Roughly grated and moisture squeezed

Edited by heidih (log)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

These zucchini fritters were breakfast yesterday and they were crisp:

IMG_2898.thumb.jpeg.5451830fd7918de28f2609b625056d9b.jpeg

 

Those fritters and Ikura I would eat.  But it's not really about the zucchini on that plate, now is it?

  • Haha 1

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

These zucchini fritters were breakfast yesterday and they were crisp:

IMG_2898.thumb.jpeg.5451830fd7918de28f2609b625056d9b.jpeg

Those look very good. I agree that a good use for zucchini is in fritters. And it can be combined with a variety of other vegetables in the batter. Kohlrabi, corn, chard, etc. Fritters with a generous amount of fresh dill would be excellent with the other stuff on that plate. Even zukes perk up when they are fried and crispy. 

 

A good way to hide them, if you really need to, is to add them to a pureed green chile chowder. A couple of potatoes, a few roasted tomatillos, roasted green chile, broth, cilantro and so on. Very forgiving.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, heidih said:

 

I put them in a phyllo dough strudel and use plenty of warm spices. Enjoyed at the party Roughly grated and moisture squeezed

 

That’s an idea...Filo pastry stuffing!

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

Those fritters and Ikura I would eat.  But it's not really about the zucchini on that plate, now is it?

 

As Mary Poppins sang, "Just a teaspoon of sugar helps the medicine go down..."     I would guess that veg box orders often bring produce that requires a little "ingenuity" , aka camouflage.   

  • Like 1

eGullet member #80.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My first time making Zucchini Fritters. Guess who forgot to squeeze the moisture out of the shredded veg before adding the other ingredients?  Went ahead and finished mixing up the batter, covered it and put it in the fridge to wait for time to cook for dinner. Kept thinking about it and checked on it about 20 minutes later. It had started to get a layer of moisture on top and I thought about setting it to drain, but then decided to just add some Panko crumbs and start cooking.

 

17A2DF4D-9D5E-4BD8-93D4-1509E584583D.thumb.jpeg.1211351434f73e4baf647edeb2f7bccd.jpeg

 

In addition to the Panko, I think the zucchini being very young and without seeds, saved my efforts. We had the Fritters with carrots and tzatziki sauce as our appetizer course with dinner.

 

13F9CB8C-C3DF-4443-9CC0-3CFA98022466.thumb.jpeg.78b87a3e2af9e504ba3b7bcf8f56b227.jpeg

 

Edited by robirdstx (log)
  • Like 8
  • Delicious 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By liuzhou
      Yesterday, an old friend sent me a picture of her family dinner, which she prepared. She was never much of a cook, so I was a bit surprised. It's the first I've seen her cook in 25 years. Here is the spread.
       

       
      I immediately zoomed in on one dish - the okra.
       

       
      For the first 20-odd years I lived in China, I never saw okra - no one knew what it was. I managed to find its Chinese name ( 秋葵 - qiū kuí) in a scientific dictionary, but that didn't help. I just got the same blank looks.
       
      Then about 3 years ago, it started to creep into a few supermarkets. At first, they stocked the biggest pods they could find - stringy and inedible - but they worked it out eventually. Now okra is everywhere.

      I cook okra often, but have never seen it served in China before (had it down the road in Vietnam, though) and there are zero recipes in any of my Chinese language cookbooks. So, I did the sensible thing and asked my friend how she prepared it. Here is her method.
       
      1. First bring a pan of water to the boil. Add the washed okra and boil for two minutes. Drain.

      2. Top and tail the pods. Her technique for that is interesting.
       

      3. Finely mince garlic, ginger, red chilli and green onion in equal quantities. Heat oil and pour over the prepared garlic mix. Add a little soy sauce.
       

      4. Place garlic mix over the okra and serve.
       
       
      When I heard step one, I thought she was merely blanching the vegetable, but she assures me that is all the cooking it gets or needs, but she did say she doesn't like it too soft.

      Also, I should have mentioned that she is from Hunan province so the red chilli is inevitable.
       
      Anyway, I plan to make this tomorrow. I'm not convinced, but we'll see.
       
      to be continued
       
       
    • By missdipsy
      Two of my family members are pescetarian, one of whom is my picky daughter who only likes a few types of fish cooked in very specific ways so to all intents and purposes is mostly vegetarian. Many Chinese soup recipes involve meat or fish, or at least meat broth, so I'd love to find a few more recipes that would suit my whole family (I also don't eat much pork as it doesn't always agree with me, and a lot of soups involve pork so this is also for my benefit!). Vegetarian would be best, or pescetarian soups that are not obviously seafood based (I could get away with sneaking a small amount of dried shrimp in, for instance, but not much more than that!).
       
      Any kind of soup will do, although I'd particularly like some simple recipes that could be served alongside a multi-dish meal. But I'm always interested in new recipes so any good soup recipes would be welcome!
       
      Any suggestions?
    • By Druckenbrodt
      So, our flights have been booked for next Sunday, we're servicing our loyal bikes, the panier bags are coming out of the cupboard and we're checking the tent still has all its poles.
      Our plan is 10 days of cycling, through the Pelopponnese and Crete, far from the madding crowds, through mountain meadows and forests full of bee hives, with regular visits to pristine hidden beaches. That's the plan.
      Of course, to make our holiday perfect, some feasting would go down well. I had thought that this would be impossible for my boyfriend, given he's vegetarian (no fish either), since I assumed the options will only be grilled meat, grilled fish, or Greek salad. But having had a look at some of these posts, it seems like there are quite a few really delicious (and popular?) dishes that don't involve meat or fish, but do include delicious things like spinach, fava beans, chick peas etc.
      So, I'd like to compile a list of Great Greek Dishes that vegetarians can eat, the sort of simple everyday stuff that we might be able to get in a small village taverna. To kick start the list I'm nominating:
      Briam - I had this about 10 years ago on the island of Amorgos and it was mindblowingly delicious. Potatoes, courgettes, tomatoes and maybe onions and lots of olive oil? All cooked together extremely slowly. I've tried recreating this but never succeeded. It's something I still have fond memories of!
      Any general advice or additions to the list would be most gratefully appreciated!
    • By Deeps
      This is one of my daughter favorite dishes, being mild and less spicy she loves this rice dish.  Its super easy to make and goes well with most Indian curries.
      Do try this out and I am sure you will be happy with the results.
       

       
      Prep Time : 5 mins
      Cook Time: 5 mins
      Serves: 2
       
      Ingredients:
      1 cup rice(basmati), cooked
      1/2 cup coconut, shredded or grated
      1 green chili, slit
      1 dried red chili
      1 1/2 tablespoon oil/ghee(clarified butter)
      1/2 teaspoon mustard seeds
      1/2 teaspoon cumin seeds
      1/2 tablespoon chana dal(split chickpeas)
      1/2 tablespoon urad dal(split black gram)
      1 teaspoon ginger, finely chopped
      A pinch of hing (asafoetida)
      Few curry leaves
      Salt to taste
       
      Directions
      1) Heat oil/ghee(clarified butter) in a pan in medium flame. I used coconut oil here because it tastes best for this dish.
      2) Add mustard seeds, cumin seeds, chana dal(split chickpeas), urad dal(split black gram), green chili, dried red chili, ginger and curry leaves. Fry this for 30 seconds in medium flame. The trick is to ensure that these are fried but not burned.
      3) Add a pinch of hing(asafoetida) and mix well.
      4) Now add the cooked rice and coconut. Stir well for about 15 to 20 seconds and switch off the flame.
      5) Finally add salt into this and mix well. You could add peanuts or cashew nuts if you prefer. Goes well with most curries.
    • By loki
      Vietnamese Pickled Eggplant
       
      These use tiny white eggplants that are nearly impossible to get here.  I tried to grow them without success (this time).  I did not have these so used unripe cherry tomatoes.
       
      Ingredients
      2 lb eggplant (tiny white SE Asian types) or green cherry tomatoes.
      1/4 cup salt
      1 TBL galangal root
      1 TBL ginger root
      12 green chilies - thai peppers or serranos
      6 cloves garlic
      1/2 cup onion finely chopped
      2 cup Granulated sugar
      2 cup water
      1/4 cup fish sauce
       
      1. Rinse off eggplant and pierce with a knife - or cut in half if larger than 3/4 inch in diameter.
       
      2. Put eggplant into jar and add salt - and water to top of jar.  Cover with plastic lid and cover loosely.  Let ferment for 7 days.
       
      3. Take out eggplant and drain.  Rinse with water.  Put into jars again.
       
      4. Chop ginger, galangal, chiles, onion, and garlic.
       
      5. Boil water and sugar, add spices and onion, and heat for 5 minutes.  Add fish sauce.
       
      6. Pour over eggplants making sure the spices and onion get all around (might have to take out some eggplant and return).
       
      7. Cover with plastic lid, and refrigerate.
       
      8. Ready in several days.  Will last a very long time in the refrigerator.
       
      Notes:  Good alongside other SE Asian dishes, or even alone with rice.  The green tomatoes are not the same texture as the eggplants, but are quite good.  The eggplants are very crispy.
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...