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FrogPrincesse

The Soup Topic (2013–)

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I purchased some bean soup mix from North Bay Traders that I've been so eager to try.

The I ordered some of this from Amazon.  It was due on Friday and I was excited to make the soup that evening or the next day.  Damned UPS somehow lost the package leaving Louisville KY on Thursday so it did not come before the weekend.  

I hate when that happens, I so much wanted to try the mix in the soup to give some real intense flavor.

Now it's due tomorrow.


Edited by lindag (log)
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I got my shipment of Sazon Goya Con Culantro y Achiote on Monday.

I had taken a package of what I thought was pork hocks out of the freezer but what turned out to be beef stew meat!

Yeah, pretty stupid.

Decided to make the best of it anyway.  Bean & Veg. soup should be good with beef.

I cooked the beef in the mini IP for 20 mins. then added the soup mix and Sazon and simmered for 2 hours.

lt couldn't have been better.  I'm tickled to have several packages of the Sazon in the pantry for use with all kinds of foods.  

 
 
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Today's beetroot soup with sesame and sunflower seeds plus parsley for decoration.

DSC_0685.JPG

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@shain  love the toppings on your soup.  They seem to really enhance the soup experience.

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We had an absurd amount of leftover turkey stock, so after a "sterilizing" ten-minute fast boil, I used it to make Caldo Verde. I used locally made rosemary-garlic sausage and added a can of cannellini beans, just because. It's not pretty, but it's delicious.

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Where have I been? I've just read the entire thread and realized that I'd missed it completely.

 

I rarely use a recipe for soup--just look in the fridge to see what's there and wing it. But I do have a wonderful recipe for a tomato red lentil soup that can raise the dead, or at least cure the unwell. I cut this out of a cooking magazine a zillion years ago so I can't give an attribution, but here it is--

 

Spicy Tomato Soup

1-3/4 pounds ripe tomatoes or 28 oz. can of crushed tomatoes

2 Tbs. vegetable oil

1 tsp. mustard seeds

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1 tsp. ground cumin

1/2 tsp. ground coriander

1/4 tsp. turmeric

2 dried red chiles

3/4 c. red lentils

6 c. water

kosher salt to taste

 

Peel and mince the tomatoes (or open the can). Heat the oil in a medium saucepan and add the mustard seeds. Cover and cook over high heat until they begin to pop and then reduce the heat to low. When the popping stops add the onion and cook, uncovered, until softened. Add the cumin, coriander, tumeric and chiles and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about one minute. Stir in the red lentils, tomatoes and water, add salt, and bring to a boil. Simmer over low heat until the lentils are falling apart, 45 minutes to an hour. 6 servings.

 

I can vouch for the restorative qualities of this soup, especially with a sour tummy. It has an Indian subcontinent tone so I suspect it came from that part of the world.

 

By the way, I've been reducing my stock to the "jelly" stage so that I can freeze it in ice cube trays and pop the cubes into a ziplock bag. Why should I freeze all that water when I can add it later when I make soup? I essentially make frozen bouillon cubes. Saves a lot of space in the freezer, which is always at a premium. One cube makes about a cup of strong stock. I have a new supply from the Thanksgiving turkeys and that should last me until next Thanksgiving. I save chicken bones in the freezer but generally use fresh vegetables--what I call The Usual Suspects, carrots, celery and onion, garlic, thyme and bay leaf--to make a pot of stock in between turkeys.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

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Roasted butternut squash, carrots and sweet potato. Chili, ginger, cinnamon.

IMG_20171122_203820.thumb.jpg.fa3e5c8b4d8b3be582c664fb311b4590.jpg

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12 minutes ago, shain said:

Roasted butternut squash, carrots and sweet potato. Chili, ginger, cinnamon.

IMG_20171122_203820.thumb.jpg.fa3e5c8b4d8b3be582c664fb311b4590.jpg

 

That looks amazing.  Do you have a link to a recipe?

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14 hours ago, Nancy in Pátzcuaro said:

Where have I been? I've just read the entire thread and realized that I'd missed it completely.

 

I rarely use a recipe for soup--just look in the fridge to see what's there and wing it. But I do have a wonderful recipe for a tomato red lentil soup that can raise the dead, or at least cure the unwell. I cut this out of a cooking magazine a zillion years ago so I can't give an attribution, but here it is--

 

Spicy Tomato Soup

1-3/4 pounds ripe tomatoes or 28 oz. can of crushed tomatoes

2 Tbs. vegetable oil

1 tsp. mustard seeds

1 medium onion, finely chopped

1 tsp. ground cumin

1/2 tsp. ground coriander

1/4 tsp. turmeric

2 dried red chiles

3/4 c. red lentils

6 c. water

kosher salt to taste

 

Peel and mince the tomatoes (or open the can). Heat the oil in a medium saucepan and add the mustard seeds. Cover and cook over high heat until they begin to pop and then reduce the heat to low. When the popping stops add the onion and cook, uncovered, until softened. Add the cumin, coriander, tumeric and chiles and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about one minute. Stir in the red lentils, tomatoes and water, add salt, and bring to a boil. Simmer over low heat until the lentils are falling apart, 45 minutes to an hour. 6 servings.

 

I can vouch for the restorative qualities of this soup, especially with a sour tummy. It has an Indian subcontinent tone so I suspect it came from that part of the world.

 

By the way, I've been reducing my stock to the "jelly" stage so that I can freeze it in ice cube trays and pop the cubes into a ziplock bag. Why should I freeze all that water when I can add it later when I make soup? I essentially make frozen bouillon cubes. Saves a lot of space in the freezer, which is always at a premium. One cube makes about a cup of strong stock. I have a new supply from the Thanksgiving turkeys and that should last me until next Thanksgiving. I save chicken bones in the freezer but generally use fresh vegetables--what I call The Usual Suspects, carrots, celery and onion, garlic, thyme and bay leaf--to make a pot of stock in between turkeys.

 

Nancy in Pátzcuaro

 

Oh, my. I've saved that one. It's cold here, and while I have this weekend's meals all planned (cassoulet in the oven as I speak!) a pot of this will be QUITE excellent next week.

 

Thanks!

 

 

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Today: the lamb broth. Tomorrow: traditional in every way Scotch Broth. Today I made a rich broth by simmering two browned lamb shanks in light chicken stock. It is now defatted and cooling, to go overnight in the fridge. Tender lamb meat has been removed from the bone, fat and weirdness discarded, also submerged in broth.

 

Tomorrow I will saute onion, celery, carrots and a bit of fennel bulb, then add the lamb stock and simmer for a bit, until veggies are soft but still distinguishable. Yes, I know, turnips are classic, but i'm just not a turnip kind of girl. Barley will be cooked separately in light stock and added toward the end with a generous amount of salt and pepper along with some shredded lamb. This is one of my all-time favorite soups. Here's to Maggie the Cat!  Some of you will remember Maggie the Cat, who waxed poetic over Scotch Broth during her days on eG.  Campbell's Scotch Broth was the only canned soup my mother would buy; she loved it. I'm sure she never tried to make it herself, and I'm sorry I never made it for her when she was alive. So here's to my mom!

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20 minutes ago, Katie Meadow said:

Today: the lamb broth. Tomorrow: traditional in every way Scotch Broth. Today I made a rich broth by simmering two browned lamb shanks in light chicken stock. It is now defatted and cooling, to go overnight in the fridge. Tender lamb meat has been removed from the bone, fat and weirdness discarded, also submerged in broth.

 

Tomorrow I will saute onion, celery, carrots and a bit of fennel bulb, then add the lamb stock and simmer for a bit, until veggies are soft but still distinguishable. Yes, I know, turnips are classic, but i'm just not a turnip kind of girl. Barley will be cooked separately in light stock and added toward the end with a generous amount of salt and pepper along with some shredded lamb. This is one of my all-time favorite soups. Here's to Maggie the Cat!  Some of you will remember Maggie the Cat, who waxed poetic over Scotch Broth during her days on eG.  Campbell's Scotch Broth was the only canned soup my mother would buy; she loved it. I'm sure she never tried to make it herself, and I'm sorry I never made it for her when she was alive. So here's to my mom!

Oh Katie, there are so many things I would like to make for my mother and grandmother.  So many silly fights that I would like to wipe out with good food.  

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lately I did something like this - exquisite Jerusalem artichoke soup (with i.a. potatoes, onion, coconut milk and mushrooms)

DSC_0499a.jpg

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@Kasia

 

your JAS soup looks extremely inviting.

 

Im not much on special presentations

 

and that's my loss.

 

everything I see above looks outstanding.

 

I lovev the saute'd possibly, a tiny bit crispy mushroom slices.

 

many Kudos your way !

 

money-mouth.gif.5bd02423ab21beb0ffc684b40391a235.gif

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1 hour ago, rotuts said:

@Kasia

 

your JAS soup looks extremely inviting.

 

Im not much on special presentations

 

and that's my loss.

 

everything I see above looks outstanding.

 

I lovev the saute'd possibly, a tiny bit crispy mushroom slices.

 

many Kudos your way !

 

money-mouth.gif.5bd02423ab21beb0ffc684b40391a235.gif

@rotuts thank you :) yes the mushrooms are saute'd

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A260B9BC-3E28-4B9B-8897-A4D0364030D8.thumb.jpeg.0b3acc61e3b8297c4d5d5abd731b3648.jpeg

 

Apple Rutabaga Soup adapted from a recipe from The Inn at Little Washington. I might rename it Essence of Autumn Soup.  It calls for rutabaga, butternut squash, carrots, sweet potato, apple and onion. 

 

I sweated off the vegetables in my very large electric fry pan before dumping everything into the Instant Pot and cooking it it on high-pressure for 10 minutes. I let the pressure drop naturally. I then carried on as per the recipe.

061609F2-E2E0-4F37-A077-18927E56E84A.thumb.jpeg.28b0080538aa65c730e25379edcab564.jpeg

 

I reduced the cream to one cup and skipped the maple syrup altogether.

 

I did push it through a fine sieve and it is smooth and creamy. 

 

Here.

 

 

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Finally soup weather here at a brisk 60 degrees and overcast. Lentils, kabocha squash, coconut milk and chipotle en adobo with some some bits of herb & spice was/is comforting and delicious. 

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Potage Parmentier (Potato & Leek Soup) from Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

IMG_6662.thumb.jpg.21a3d8f67a3a53ab07c1a6c84779e81a.jpg

So simple and delicious.

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21 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

Potage Parmentier (Potato & Leek Soup) from Mastering the Art of French Cooking.

IMG_6662.thumb.jpg.21a3d8f67a3a53ab07c1a6c84779e81a.jpg

So simple and delicious.

Soup looks good.  Dishes look glorious.

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36 minutes ago, Darienne said:

Soup looks good.  Dishes look glorious.

 

Yes. Those dishes are gorgeous.  Blue and white = my favourite.  

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Julia’s soups are always excellent.  She has a great section on soups in her book The Way To Cook.

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So the 60F degree day of yesterday is gone and the jet stream is roaring above, drawing in cold air by the minute into the clear blue sky.  

Craving tomato soup so will try something I've been meaning to... tomato soup with roasted fennel.  Been thinking about this for a while and mulling over how I want it to taste.  Normally I only make tomato soup in the late summer/fall using fresh Jersey tomatoes but have been thinking about working with some of the newer roasted San Marzano tinned tomatoes.  I have fallen in lust with roasted fennel - thanks Ed(my friend's husband who used to work in restaurants).   Now just thinking of what else I want to do as far as spices/herbs/etc.

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