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Korean Namul and Banchan


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95 replies to this topic

#61 melonpan

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Posted 09 November 2004 - 12:01 AM

<center><b>hobak jeon (호박전)
fried korean squash</b>

<img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

2 korean hobak (squash)
2 eggs
2 tablespoons flour
salt and pepper

<ol><li>rinse, pat dry squash. slice into coins, about 1 cm thick.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>
<li>prepare flour by adding salt and pepper and mixing well. crack eggs into a small bowl (large enough to lay the coins of squash flat) and whip them with chopsticks until just mixed.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com...108hobak2.jpg"> <img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>dip both sides of a slice of hobak in flour, making sure the entire surface is well dusted with flour. then dip the dusted squash in the egg. make sure that it is completely covered with beaten eggs, then pan fry in oil.

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>

<li>serve with chojang, a mixture of soy sauce and vinegar. you can add korean chile powder (gochugaru) to taste, or you can use some of the jangajji soy sauce you may have around.</ol>
<hr width = "65%">
<i>notes:<blockquote>you can buy hobak at korean grocery markets. but if you want, you can substitute zucchini with very similar results.</blockquote></i>

<center><img src="http://www.rawbw.com....jpg"></center>
"Bibimbap shappdy wappdy wap." - Jinmyo

#62 _john

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Posted 12 August 2007 - 05:59 PM

This is a great thread.

I'm looking for a recipe for a potato banchan. it is usually quartered or halved potatoes that are sweet and a little crispy. it seems like they have been fried and then boiled in syrup? does anyone have the recipe?

#63 SheenaGreena

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 09:03 PM

I have never heard of anything like that, but it sounds kinda like simmered potatoes in soy sauce and a little bit of sugar (if you want sweetness). However that technique makes the potatoes mushy and not crispy.
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#64 _john

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 12:44 AM

I think it is an adaptation of gam-ja. I have had it at various restaurants in the SF bay area. Has anyone eaten at Han Yang Korean Bar-B-Q in Hayward or Seoul House in Oakland? They have this particular banchan there. They were similar to Japanese daigakuimo but not as sweet.

#65 Macarons&Mozart

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Posted 16 August 2007 - 02:28 AM

I am not quite sure what you're talking about here, John, so it might be a newer creation using Korean flavors. Like Sheen said, a similar preparation is "gamja jorim" (gamja=potato, jorim=stewed or simmered in a flavorful sauce). We make it at home with small whole red potatoes (in their jackets) the size of ping pong or golf balls and par-boil them until half cooked, and then finish cooking to just-done by simmering in soy sauce, a bit of water, sugar to taste (some restaurants make it quite sweet), and if you like, a clove or 2 of crushed garlic. Once they're done, sprinkle with some toasted sesame seeds.

This preparation is also great with "goguma" (sweet potato). Same preparation, except don't make the liquid too salty, because the cut sweet potatoes will absorb more salt from the soy sauce.

Another great potato banchan is to cut some peeled potatoes into matchsticks and sauté them with lots of chopped garlic, some green Korean peppers, some sliced onion, and sesame seeds. The trick is to sauté the the potatoes until they are about 75% cooked. There should still be a bit of crunch in the center. Season with salt, sesame oil and finish with a flurry of chopped green onion. Its a nice breakfast too with a fried egg!

#66 SheenaGreena

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 05:28 AM

Another great potato banchan is to cut some peeled potatoes into matchsticks and sauté them with lots of chopped garlic, some green Korean peppers, some sliced onion, and sesame seeds. The trick is to sauté the the potatoes until they are about 75% cooked. There should still be a bit of crunch in the center. Season with salt, sesame oil and finish with a flurry of chopped green onion. Its a nice breakfast too with a fried egg!




whoa, I forgot all about that panchan. I haven't had that since I was a wee lass, and I think i'm going to whip some up for lunch. That stuff is fantastic, and you're right about leaving it 25% uncooked. It's crunchiness is key.
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#67 nakji

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Posted 03 June 2008 - 05:27 AM

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I made these two side dishes from recipes over at Just Bento - on the left is asparagus in a gochujang-miso sauce, and on the right are green beans and carrot with ginger. I guess they're more technically Japanese, but any small vegetable side dish will always be banchan to me, so I decided to post them here. We need some sort of pan-asian fusion thread to honour the cold-veggie side dish tradition.

Actually, I almost put both of these in the recipes that rock thread, because they're soooooooo yummy. Perfect with a cold beer while waiting for hubby to get home from the train.

#68 acautrell

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Posted 25 February 2009 - 11:00 AM

I get Korean takeout quite often and the banchan of course varies from week to week. Last week for the first time I received a single hotdog, diagonally slivered and lightly browned. I was just curious if this is traditional anywhere, or if the women at my carryout just really like hot dogs.

#69 SheenaGreena

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 11:07 AM

Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc.

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war.

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew. It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc. It was a favorite dish growing up (:
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#70 acautrell

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 11:47 AM

Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc. 

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war. 

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew.  It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc.  It was a favorite dish growing up (:

View Post


Yeah, I know hotdogs can be used in stuff, but I've never been presented a naked lonely hotdog as banchan. I felt somewhat cheated.

I expect extra fish cake on my next visit to make up for it.

#71 nakji

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 06:02 PM

Yeah, Korean banchan is a bit like a box of chocolates. Sometimes you get the truffle, and sometimes you get the nougat....or a naked hot dog, as it were.

I recently started making my own banchan, and found two really good recipes in "The Korean Table" - the potatoes in soy and sweet sauce, which were absolute gold - whenever I got these in Korea, it was a red-letter day, so I was so happy to make them at home.


And I made my favourite daikon strips, without which no bibimbap is complete, in my eyes. These are great, I'll be making them all the time.

Posted Image

Now if I could just figure out how to make those sweet black beans...

#72 SheenaGreena

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Posted 26 February 2009 - 09:22 PM

Is that moo saengchae? I had some tonight with with bossam....extra extra tasty (:
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#73 milgwimper

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Posted 27 February 2009 - 05:40 AM

Yeah, Korean banchan is a bit like a box of chocolates. Sometimes you get the truffle, and sometimes you get the nougat....or a naked hot dog, as it were.

I recently started making my own banchan, and found two really good recipes in "The Korean Table" - the potatoes in soy and sweet sauce, which were absolute gold - whenever I got these in Korea, it was a red-letter day, so I was so happy to make them at home.


And I made my favourite daikon strips, without which no bibimbap is complete, in my eyes. These are great, I'll be making them all the time.

Posted Image

Now if I could just figure out how to make those sweet black beans...

View Post


Nakji,

here is the recipe for the sweet black beans. I don't think she uses the black soy beans for the recipe but just substitute them.

Maangchi KongJang recipe.

#74 milgwimper

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Posted 15 March 2009 - 01:41 PM

This is a great thread.

I'm looking for a recipe for a potato banchan. it is usually quartered or halved potatoes that are sweet and a little crispy. it seems like they have been fried and then boiled in syrup? does anyone have the recipe?

View Post



I think I know the food you are talking about. Normally it is a street food, or served as dessert. mom grandmother used to make this dish, and we used to sneak out and buy some from the vendors. Here is a website with the picture of the potatoes and a recipe. aeriskitchen.com sweet-potato-dessert (고구마-맛탕-goguma-mattang)

#75 Joon

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Posted 01 May 2009 - 01:41 PM

Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc. 

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war. 

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew.  It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc.  It was a favorite dish growing up (:

View Post


Whenever I get a budae chigae craving at home I make a ramen with cheese, hot dogs, spam, bacon and kim chi. :D Pretty close to the same thing!

#76 powerplantop

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Posted 17 September 2009 - 04:29 PM

I get Korean takeout quite often and the banchan of course varies from week to week. Last week for the first time I received a single hotdog, diagonally slivered and lightly browned. I was just curious if this is traditional anywhere, or if the women at my carryout just really like hot dogs.


At home my Mother-inlaw will sometimes serve hot dogs just like that. But I have never gotten it when out of the house.

#77 powerplantop

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 11:04 PM

Posting a pic of Oijangajji Muchim that I made.

Posted Image

First I had to make the pickles (oijangajji)

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  • pickel.jpg


#78 powerplantop

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Posted 04 December 2009 - 11:10 PM

Never seen anyone do that exact thing at a korean restaurant, but it is popular to put hot dogs in things like budae chigae, kimchi fried rice, kimbap, baked goods, etc.

Processed meat products (spam, hot dogs, corned beef, etc) are popular bc Americans introduced them during the Korean war.

Theres a very popular dish called "budae chigae" which means army dish stew. It requires the addition of processed meats (hot dogs perhaps) and additional things like cheese, ramen, potatoes, etc. It was a favorite dish growing up (:


Here is one I made a few nights ago.

Posted Image

#79 milgwimper

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Posted 05 December 2009 - 01:52 PM

Posting a pic of Oijangajji Muchim that I made.

Posted Image

First I had to make the pickles (oijangajji)



This is one of my favorite banchan! :9

#80 SheenaGreena

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Posted 08 December 2009 - 08:29 PM

We eat the same thing at my house, but my mother slices the pickles really thin and then squeezes them. I think this makes them crunchier and they taste really good with fresh rice with some hot or cold boricha poured over the rice.
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#81 ZenKimchi

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Posted 10 December 2009 - 05:46 PM

Part of me wonders how this banchan would taste battered and fried.
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#82 powerplantop

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 08:11 AM

Part of me wonders how this banchan would taste battered and fried.


You know fried dill pickles are quite big in MS. These are kind of similar but have more flavors so I would think that they would be better.

#83 powerplantop

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 08:14 AM

Soy sauce version of Korean Cucumber Pickle. I like this one also.

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#84 powerplantop

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Posted 15 December 2009 - 08:15 AM

Bean sprout banchan that I made.

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#85 ZenKimchi

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Posted 29 December 2009 - 09:03 AM

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Myeolchi Bokkeum (Stir-fried Anchovies)

Recipe here
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#86 powerplantop

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 03:00 PM

I made this Perilla leaf kimchi 깻잎김치

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Used the recipe found here.

#87 nakji

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 07:24 PM

Pretty! That's a rather uncommon panchan to get at restaurants, too, isn't it? At least it was when I lived in Korea. What did you eat it with?

#88 powerplantop

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Posted 09 January 2010 - 09:26 PM

Pretty! That's a rather uncommon panchan to get at restaurants, too, isn't it? At least it was when I lived in Korea. What did you eat it with?


It takes a lot of work to make it for such a small amount so I am sure that is why its not normal at restaurants.

I ate it with Beoseot jeongol 버섯전골
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#89 nakji

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 12:06 AM

Niiiiceeee. I made beosot-kalguksu shabu-shabu the other night, which is one of my husband's favourite dishes. Are those two other kimchis on the side?

#90 powerplantop

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Posted 10 January 2010 - 10:24 AM

One of them is Cucumber Pickle and the other is a fresh kimchi form a nice looking green I saw at the market. Honestly I don't know what kind of green it is, but it made a nice kimchi.