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Keith_W
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Andre, Cold Duck and similar we considered "chanpagne" cuz of the pop of the (plastic) cork and the bubbles - way back even in my wine producing state. We started calling it "sparkling wine" once we tasted real champagne and laws changed. Our Domaine Chandon we do call sparkling wine. Domaine Chandon is located in Napa Valley in the town of Yountville, California. Established in 1973 by Moët et Chandon,

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There are certainly better sparkling wines in cans.

 

I don't personally know of any authentic French champagne in that format, though I have seen it sold (alongside canned wines) in single-serve bottles, with a straw attached.

 

Coppola has a very decent blanc des blancs in a can, and I suppose I could have grabbed an image of that, but the one I chose seemed more appropriate to accompany Christmas Dinner In a Can.

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“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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As @liuzhoucarefully explained:

Use of the word Champagne

The United States bans the use from all new U.S.-produced wines. Only those that had approval to use the term on labels before 2006 may continue to use it and only when it is accompanied by the wine's actual origin (e.g., "California"). From Wikipedia  

Edited by Anna N
To add the source of the quote. (log)
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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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24 minutes ago, heidih said:

Andre, Cold Duck and similar we considered "chanpagne" cuz of the pop of the (plastic) cork and the bubbles -

I used to enjoy the occasional glass of Cold Duck (Andre) but in the last couple of years it has disappeared from the shelves around here.  I have switched to Spumante.

Edited by lindag (log)
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7 minutes ago, Anna N said:

As @liuzhoucarefully explained:

Use of the word Champagne

The United States bans the use from all new U.S.-produced wines. Only those that had approval to use the term on labels before 2006 may continue to use it and only when it is accompanied by the wine's actual origin (e.g., "California"). From Wikipedia  

 

Yes, the wikipedi article on champagne is surprisngly good for once!

 

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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1 hour ago, liuzhou said:

 

Depends where you are. Most major countries agree that only sparkling wine made under strict conditions and specifications in Champagne, France can legally be named champagne. The USA is the stand out exception. They adopted the international standard in 2006 (over 100 years after mostly everyone else). The name can still be used in the US for non-Champagne champagnes if they were used on a specific product prior to 2006 and also give the true origin.

 

 

And now, of course, Russia, which enacted a law in July saying that only Russian-made wines can be labeled Shampanskoye — the Russian word for Champagne and French sparklers from the Champagne region or anywhere else must be labeled as sparkling wine. 

France And Russia Are In A Tussle Over Who Gets To Call Champagne ... 'Champagne'

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

Andre, Cold Duck and similar we considered "chanpagne" cuz of the pop of the (plastic) cork and the bubbles - way back even in my wine producing state. We started calling it "sparkling wine" once we tasted real champagne and laws changed. Our Domaine Chandon we do call sparkling wine. Domaine Chandon is located in Napa Valley in the town of Yountville, California. Established in 1973 by Moët et Chandon,

I had always thought Baby Duck was fizzy but Cold Duck was still - but apparently I was wrong. Only ever drank the Baby Duck and not past my teen years. 

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
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26 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I had always thought Baby Duck was fizzy but Cold Duck was still - but apparently I was wrong. Only ever drank the Baby Duck and not past my teen years. 

I have a pretty distinct memory of my dad shooting the Cold Duck "cork" through the kitchen ceiling light panel. Expensive replacement. 

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37 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

I had always thought Baby Duck was fizzy but Cold Duck was still - but apparently I was wrong. Only ever drank the Baby Duck and not past my teen years. 

I wasn’t sure but I did learn that Baby Duck got its name from its low alcohol content! Alcohol/volume 7%! Baby Duck is still available at the LCBO but it appears that Cold Duck has disappeared from the shelves. 

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I have never heard of Baby Duck.    Deprived youth.

 

It's Canadian.  A short history of Baby Duck, Canada's favourite wine.

 

Speaking of youthful nonsense, in my teenage years, it was quite popular to snag some Molson Brador, which we ridiculously coveted because of it's slightly higher alcohol content vs most US beers. 

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