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10 hours ago, CantCookStillTry said:

 

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I see you're rocking a Global knife in the background. Just a single or a whole set?

 

@shain The pizza with the figs looks incredible. And your crust/char look perfect.

 

I had extravagant plans for dinners this week (see the smoking thread and the 12 hour pork butt that is still mostly in my fridge), but in-laws showed up and my schedule went down the tubes.

 

Didn't get a picture, but my amazing wife turned half of the pork butt in to carnitas for tacos, with homemade mango salsa, spicy guac, pickled onions.

 

Was planning to make my own baguettes and use the rest for banh mi tonight, we'll see what the clock dictates.

 

Last nights dinner was sirloin rescued from the freezer that I grilled, Mrs' M made chimichurri, my oldest daughter made biscuits and an arugula salad. Everything was nearly gone when I realized I should try to get a pic. Here is the last bite:

 

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PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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14 hours ago, ambra said:

 

 

@Franci, can you say how you did the pork? It looks amazing and is something I miss!

 

 

Good to see you again @ambra :)

The pork is Andrea Nguyen recipe for char siu pork, you can definitely find it on google. I add only a teaspoon extra of salt to the marinade.  I get a nice fatty piece of pork than I can cut in regular size. I cut about 4-6 long strips  from a 1kg -1.2kg pork roast. Bake 15 minutes on one side at 375F, I flip, do 10-15 minutes more  and then I broil on medium brushing some reserved marinade (my oven can broil convection or static. I do static because, with the sugar and honey burns easily) also I keep a certain distance, like middle oven, I broil 6 minutes, turn broil more until it’s all even. If you cannot find the recipe let me know. 

 

 

Yesterday dinner, super lazy. My husband came home with a full smoked salmon, this is Ducktrap River Salmon, I like it, very mellow easy to like salmon. With salad, french green beans and homemade crusty bread. 

 

 

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Edited by Franci (log)
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Tonight I had to skip making the baguettes - but we found some very nice substitute bread for our Banh mi.

 

The pork started as a 12 hour smoke over in this thread. I tossed the second half that wasn't eaten as carnitas with some onion & garlic I had sweated with a dash of 5-spice, added 1/4 cup of butter for texture and fish sauce.

 

My lovely wife pickled the radish and carrot, and we served it with a mayo/sriracha spread and all the fresh veggies. Turned out delightful. My last banh mi was in Ho Chi Minh city in February, and I've been working up a serious craving that this fully satisfied.

 

 

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Edited by pastameshugana (log)
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PastaMeshugana

"The roar of the greasepaint, the smell of the crowd."

"What's hunger got to do with anything?" - My Father

My eG Food Blog (2011)

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

@Franci  Your husband always sounds like a really good shopper. Not my male experience. Give the man a hug

 

Oh, dear, he is a TERRIBLE shopper. He is good for shopping meat and very simple stuff, wine, yes, for that he is a great shopper. You need to leave a very detailed list and names, pictures and locations possibly. And I never trust him on fruit and vegetables. A trip to Costco means 20 phone calls minimum 🤣🤣🤣 

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I don't usually eat in the evening so rarely post in this thread but it happened today. 

Scallop Aguachile with tomato-habanero water and pickled gooseberries from Josef Centeno's Amá.  Recipe available online here

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Scallops were very big - 8 of them weighed a little over a pound - so I should have sliced them into thinner slices.  Still tongue-tinglingly delicious.

Edited to add that the tomato-habanero water this recipe uses is basically a drained pico de gallo.  The recipe says not to press on the solids to avoid turning the water cloudy and to discard the solids.  Since there was plenty of flavor there and because it used pineapple vinegar, I added chopped pineapple to the drained solids to make a pineapple salsa.  Fried up some tortilla chips to complete the meal. 

Edited by blue_dolphin (log)
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26 minutes ago, blue_dolphin said:

I don't usually eat in the evening so rarely post in this thread but it happened today. 

Scallop Aguachile with tomato-habanero water and pickled gooseberries from Josef Centeno's Amá.  Recipe available online here

 

Scallops were very big - 8 of them weighed a little over a pound - so I should have sliced them into thinner slices.  Still tongue-tinglingly delicious.

 

Aguachile shrimp is something I dearly miss from my big Mexican mart deli. With fresh corn chips!  Summer for sure.

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13 hours ago, shain said:

Neapolitan style pizza dough.

Margarita.

Ricotta, mozzarella, figs, a touch of aniseed, pepper.

 

 

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Great job, @shain !

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For @liuzhou !

 

318146459_Cornyellowsquashsaute08-06IMG_1826.jpeg.778b31dd039367f1939baa244193d946.jpeg

 

I often take delicious sweet corn off the cob, and sauté it in butter, with some scallions and chives thrown in. If it's good enough for Jacques, it's good enough for me.

 

 

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So, for dinner - crab cakes, corn sauté with yellow squash (sprinkled with parsley for extra goodness), tater tots.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Fridays are usually pizza and movie night at my house.  Actually, since quarantine, every night has been movie night after dinner at my house.  We have a jar with everyone's names in it and draw after breakfast.  The person drawn gets to pick the movie.  I kept the pizza pretty simple and old school last night.  Extra cheese

 

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Pepperoni

 

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Cheese with pesto and tomato sauce mixed together

 

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The movie was old school too: Raiders of the Lost Ark.

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Ethyopean beyaynetu. Bought the injeras from a local restaurant and made four simple stews to go on it.

Chickpeas with near-raw tomatoes, caramelized onion, chilies, parsley and some spices. 

Seitan, eggs, caramelized onion, with lots of berbere with warm flavors of toasted chili, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg, pepper, ginger, cumin, coriander.

Red lentils with lots with sweet chilies, ginger and other spices.

Chopped chickpeas with fire roasted eggplant, herbs and spices. 

Most stews make use of some amount of home made berbere spice mix, garlic and ginger and browned butter. 

Farmers cheese with cucumber, onion, chili, toasted cumin and nigella.

Also a chopped salad, flavored with lemon and olive oil as we have almost every day, but here spiced up with just a little garlic and coriander powder.

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~ Shai N.

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3 minutes ago, shain said:

Ethyopean beyaynetu. Bought the injeras from a local restaurant and made four simple stews to go on it.

Chickpeas with near-raw tomatoes, caramelized onion, chilies, parsley and some spices. 

Seitan, eggs, caramelized onion, with lots of berbere with warm flavors of toasted chili, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg, pepper, ginger, cumin, coriander.

Red lentils with lots with sweet chilies, ginger and other spices.

Chopped chickpeas with fire roasted eggplant, herbs and spices. 

Most stews make use of some amount of home made berbere spice mix, garlic and ginger and browned butter. 

Farmers cheese with cucumber, onion, chili, toasted cumin and nigella.

Also a chopped salad, flavored with lemon and olive oil as we have almost every day, but here spiced up with just a little garlic and coriander powder.

 

 

As always - wish I was at your table. Beautiful injera bubbles.What intrigued me was the use of coriander powder. This one with roasted seed and added curry leaves intrigued me. Something to add to the pantry when I reclaim my pantry space. I have never used it.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEtA48ChyzM

 

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11 minutes ago, shain said:

Ethyopean beyaynetu. Bought the injeras from a local restaurant and made four simple stews to go on it.

Chickpeas with near-raw tomatoes, caramelized onion, chilies, parsley and some spices. 

Seitan, eggs, caramelized onion, with lots of berbere with warm flavors of toasted chili, cardamom, cinnamon, nutmeg, pepper, ginger, cumin, coriander.

Red lentils with lots with sweet chilies, ginger and other spices.

Chopped chickpeas with fire roasted eggplant, herbs and spices. 

Most stews make use of some amount of home made berbere spice mix, garlic and ginger and browned butter. 

Farmers cheese with cucumber, onion, chili, toasted cumin and nigella.

Also a chopped salad, flavored with lemon and olive oil as we have almost every day, but here spiced up with just a little garlic and coriander powder.

IMG_20200801_152427_1.jpg

IMG_20200801_152505.jpg

A fast glance reminded me of Gustaf Klimpt's works.     Lovely!

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eGullet member #80.

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22 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

As always - wish I was at your table. Beautiful injera bubbles.What intrigued me was the use of coriander powder. This one with roasted seed and added curry leaves intrigued me. Something to add to the pantry when I reclaim my pantry space. I have never used it.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TEtA48ChyzM

 

 

I love coriander - toasted, fried, raw. Should be lovely with curry leaves.

One of my favorite usages is dukkah, where toasted coriander is mixed (in my version) with toasted sesame, peanuts, cumin and salt, and roughly ground. I love mixing it with butter and eating with pita bread. I'd imagine similar usages will also work with other creative blends.

Edited by shain (log)
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~ Shai N.

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9 hours ago, weinoo said:

For @liuzhou !

 

318146459_Cornyellowsquashsaute08-06IMG_1826.jpeg.778b31dd039367f1939baa244193d946.jpeg

 

 

 

 

 

 

Several years ago our National broadcaster (ABC) did a documentary on the sewage system for Sydney. Some of the system is brick lined tunnels, over 100 years old but still in good conditions and in use. The whole system feeds into a sewage treatment works with large digesting  ponds  and other treatment. That way the sewage is converted by bacteria into useful stuff and water.

Well the ponds themselves produce a sludge that is removed and dried and further processed  to reduce it further.

 

The video showed this sludge being transported, it looked like dark compost but it was dotted all through with yellow.

 

The narrator asked the operator what it was and the operator replied (with a grin I might add) "corn" kernels. He said that corn had survived both the digestive tract of humans plus the bacteria in the digesting ponds. Apparently the outer coating on individual corn kernels is pretty tough stuff. Once you break the kernel, the starch becomes available but the outer covering survives (I guess that is "enough roughage to prevent constipation" as suggest in good health diets)

 

So there probably is yet another reason to avoid corn

 

Myself I only eat corn on the cob (hot with butter dripping off it...). I find its taste and texture of the kernels adds nothing but texture to a salad and I find that texture unpleasant .

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42 minutes ago, Bernie said:

 

Several years ago our National broadcaster (ABC) did a documentary on the sewage system for Sydney. Some of the system is brick lined tunnels, over 100 years old but still in good conditions and in use. The whole system feeds into a sewage treatment works with large digesting  ponds  and other treatment. That way the sewage is converted by bacteria into useful stuff and water.

Well the ponds themselves produce a sludge that is removed and dried and further processed  to reduce it further.

 

The video showed this sludge being transported, it looked like dark compost but it was dotted all through with yellow.

 

The narrator asked the operator what it was and the operator replied (with a grin I might add) "corn" kernels. He said that corn had survived both the digestive tract of humans plus the bacteria in the digesting ponds. Apparently the outer coating on individual corn kernels is pretty tough stuff. Once you break the kernel, the starch becomes available but the outer covering survives (I guess that is "enough roughage to prevent constipation" as suggest in good health diets)

 

So there probably is yet another reason to avoid corn

 

Myself I only eat corn on the cob (hot with butter dripping off it...). I find its taste and texture of the kernels adds nothing but texture to a salad and I find that texture unpleasant .

 

Oh we  do that with the good bacteria, generate our own power,  and send the solids to our California farmers. Never heard the corn anecdote. Maybe our digesters are more active. "The cycle of life"   https://www.lacsd.org/

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