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JoNorvelleWalker

Dinner 2020

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Posted (edited)

So the next meal was,  fried chicken.. it's a three day process to make and a two day process to eat... I think it's even better cold the next day but, it's personal preference... hot and crunchy and extra juicy is not a bad thing either... first day is a brine, second day is a butter milk soak, the third day I cover in flour and let the whole thing can tacky before frying... 

My father in law has a lot of spices in his cabinet.. Stuff i have never used.. So, i just sort of threw it all in the spice mix.. ancho powder and garlic salt and onion powder and all types of paprika, curries and whatever... i just dumped it all in..  I have recipe that I use for the shop and well, they are delicious but, who the hell wants work food..  I had no idea how this was going to turn out and it turned out really well.. And well, that's how you learn too.. 

 

 

This was the second coating of flour:

 

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whatever, i did a horrible job of documenting this chicken.. it was really freaking good. 

 

after sitting with flour on it for 24 hours 

 

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Fried:

 

I have two slo motion videos, by mistake and a couple of blurry shots:

 

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Then next day served cold chicken with a salad with croutons and a mustard vinegrette.. The dressing was mustard, cream, sour cream, olive oil, lemon and a lot of black pepper.. Covered the whole thing in dill.. The croutons were the last of bread diced and fried in olive oil. 

 

Also, i served a Sauce Soubise with the cold chicken.. you have to love the french... i first read about this sauce maybe 15 years ago... i have yet to make it but, it has been in the back of my head.. So, the other day when I was smoking vegetables, i added an onion or two into the mix for the purpose of making this sauce.. it's super easy. take a caramalized onion and blend it with cream... i added salt, sugar, a shot of lemon but, that and the perfectly caramalized and slightly smoking onion made such a great combo

 

 

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this was lunch the next day:

 

 

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a simple potato salad.  olive oil, parsley and lemon... as requested. 

 

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these were the last pieces fried from the night before so a little dark and neglected but,still really good..  the brine makes them so juicy

 

 

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and that soubise sauce:

 

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Edited by BKEats (log)
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@Shelby – thanks for the gratin directions.  I told Mr. Kim about it last night and his eyes gleamed!  Every time I see your home made egg rolls, I vow to give them another try.  They look so great. 

 

@Ann_T – your battered halibut is perhaps the most delicious looking fish I’ve ever seen!  I’ve gone to your blog to get the recipe and hope to make it soon (may end up being cod, though – halibut is crazy expensive here). 

 

@TicTac – would love to have the recipe for that apple salad!

 

 

Dinner last night was a throwback to the 1970’s.  I did pan fried Sizzleburgers with butter and Worcestershire sauce.  It smelled like my Momma’s kitchen back then.  All ready to Sizzle:

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Sizzling:

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To me this is the best possible burger – a good crust, frying in it’s own fat and not too big – these were probably just short of 1/4 lb. and it was 80/20 meat. 

 

Served with broccoli and fries:

IMG_2282.jpg.24583b0e65447ba5e2d631f7e474ba04.jpg

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I don’t have an instant pot but do have a stove top pressure cooker.   Use it mostly for making stock from chicken carcasses.  I cook most things stove top.  I feel like I develop more flavor that way.  Could be wrong 

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7 hours ago, TicTac said:

 

 Perhaps because you started cooking after midnight!? 😛

 

 

In this case it was more the three mile walk.  Dinner was actually on the table by 1:00 am.

 

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12 minutes ago, scubadoo97 said:

I don’t have an instant pot but do have a stove top pressure cooker.   Use it mostly for making stock from chicken carcasses.  I cook most things stove top.  I feel like I develop more flavor that way.  Could be wrong 

 

there is no doubt pressure cookers have a purpose for people.. . i dont think they are good for everything.. I know people who will swear by the pressure cooker cheesecake. the type of cooking i prefer, i would just leave the stock on the stove over night and come back to it when it was done.. the same way i soak beans over night.  but, yes, you can make a nice stock fairly quickly in a pressure cooker..   I am very much, live and let live.. and I don't knock anyone for anything.. You even want to microwave your pizza to reheat, if I am not eating it, why would I possibly care. I mean, if you asked for my advice, i would not suggest it.   Not the same for pressure cooker.. I think its very good for beans and to start a stock off , the rice that was made for me was very good... I mean, I am assuming, if they didn't use the instapot it wouldn't have been as good so, that's great they used. it. 

 

But yes, i don't think a pressure cooker is bad for some things.  Artichokes, not on the good list. 

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12 minutes ago, BKEats said:

 

there is no doubt pressure cookers have a purpose for people.. . i dont think they are good for everything.. I know people who will swear by the pressure cooker cheesecake. the type of cooking i prefer, i would just leave the stock on the stove over night and come back to it when it was done.. the same way i soak beans over night.  but, yes, you can make a nice stock fairly quickly in a pressure cooker..   I am very much, live and let live.. and I don't knock anyone for anything.. You even want to microwave your pizza to reheat, if I am not eating it, why would I possibly care. I mean, if you asked for my advice, i would not suggest it.   Not the same for pressure cooker.. I think its very good for beans and to start a stock off , the rice that was made for me was very good... I mean, I am assuming, if they didn't use the instapot it wouldn't have been as good so, that's great they used. it. 

 

But yes, i don't think a pressure cooker is bad for some things.  Artichokes, not on the good list. 


Just think, when the apocalypse comes and electricity is a distant memory you'll be so well prepared! 🔥🔥🔥

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That wasn't chicken

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Posted (edited)

The other night, a sorta kinda light dinner was necessary - I think we had duck for lunch, so...

 

1782566256_Mushroommisosoup05-18.jpeg.2d9eee1869467db935619324b5745592.jpeg

 

I had some nice mushroom/vegetable stock, so made a miso mushroom spring veg soup. Served with it...

 

800933599_Breadandbroccoli05-18.jpeg.f60d675f4f6c0c70b3a579dbfbc8502a.jpeg

 

Some focaccia and sautéed broccolini. Jeez, I'm almost a vegetarian. Then, I got a delivery...

 

1229728989_Ramps05-19.jpeg.29dd5bbaf4ecd024bcbaa61664d61941.jpeg

 

Of those gorgeous ramps, among other spring alliums. Which meant...

 

411068859_Rampspaghetti05-19.jpeg.474e1fdb6604d857ae3faabf6827bb9c.jpeg

 

Spaghetti, with lots of ramps, baby garlic, spring onions and leeks, parmesan and bread crumbs. Needed some green stuff on the side...

 

1428103386_Shrimpsalad05-19.jpeg.8c4ccfeb9671479fc10a981474ec5ada.jpeg

 

And topped the salad with some steam broiled wild shrimp.

 


Edited by weinoo (log)
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Shrooms kissed with truffle

1730082627_photo1-3.thumb.JPG.bf7b720f8093294a138bee45d9bea285.JPG

 

Packaged lobster ravioli.   

1378929721_photo3.thumb.JPG.609e02ed11fcad7b7ea8084d38ebd96e.JPG

 

Greens

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Dinner05212020.png

 

I thought this was lamb.  I usually label my bags with four digits for the year but I don't always note the contents.  Anyhow, Philips grilled pork spareribs.  Switched out the wine at the last moment.

 

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Smoked kielbasa w spinach, caramelized onion over egg noodles w a dijon apple cider sauce - comfort food 101

 

kiel2.thumb.jpg.8ffa2ad10abdca4737f1f62c4ecbcade.jpg

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That wasn't chicken

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Posted (edited)

We were able to find these beautiful soft shell crabs.. i have never seen crabs so alive before.. We get them by the cases normally and I haven't seen these guys that lively... there are 5 of us that eat crabs so, we got 10... for 2 separate meals.. the first meal was tempura fried crab served over creamed leeks and fennel... 

 

Again, i need a photographer.. It's hard to cook and photograph and well, i would rather the food taste good and be hot than the photo be beautiful...  Maybe I have a tripod somewhere..

 

A classic creamed leeks but, i added some nutmeg and fennel to the dish to make it a little different.. thinly sliced fennel cooked with butter, then the sliced leeks are added to the fennel, cook for another 10 minutes with some butter and water, then add cream, more salt, sugar, nutmeg. a shot of lemon.. 

 

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Spaghetti with clam sauce... I add garlic and oil, then a tomato, then wine, then a little paprika, cayenne and red pepper flake, then the clams... When they open, i remove the clams and take the meat from the shell..  Then I added the last of the leftover chorizo... Add some paprika to the broth, then some parsley and some dill... Cook for a bit, add a pad or two of butter, tighten the sauce.. Then add the clam meat and finally the pasta, then more fresh herbs... 

 

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My father in law does not like fish and claimed this to be his favorite meal.. 

 

 

The kids made cookies from scratch... I had to add panko to mine as I like mine crunchy... i was hoping it would work.. it was ok... Lots of salt.. 

 

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Edited by BKEats (log)
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Posted (edited)

Crab BLT's the other day...   I wanted to do an entire meal on the grill.. it's just easier, less mess... So, put the bacon on a sheet try and cooked in the oven..

 

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I also noticed that they had these fava beans.. We were at this fancy grocery store and things were so expensive.. Think frozen shrimp were like 20 bucks a pound.. I picked up two bags for shrimp cocktail before realizing, i was holding 80 dollars worth of shrimp... So, hard pass!

 

My normal experience with favas is a long laborious process, boiling, deshelling.. it takes a long time.. this was just stuff and orange with garlic, mint and chile peppers... cover favas in olive oil and grill... about 20 minutes.. they came out perfect... the stuffed orange was unnecessary but, i liked the visual. fava's were like 3 bucks a pound... if you go to fancy groceries, there are some good finds... Normally stuff fancy people don't want to cook, things that may be a little difficult...  For example, i buy marrow bones at this super expensive butcher.. None of the clientele will make stock so, I literally get bones cheaper their than i would from a supplier. 

 

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Edited by BKEats (log)
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Posted (edited)

I made these alkaline noodles the other day.. it involves using baking soda that was baked. you then dissolve like a tsp of the baked baking soda into a tablespoon of water and make noodles like you normally do... It adds a bounciness to the noodles... Completely transforms them from italian to chinese..   Anyway, i made the noodles and then a quick base for sesame noodles... it's my own adaptation... I add peanut butter, tahini, soy, black vinegar, chile oil, sesame oil, sugar and a little sichuan oil, garlic and ginger.. i like to add scallions but, it was in the downstairs fridge and I am lazy. 

 

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I banged this meal out in like 20 minutes. 


Edited by BKEats (log)
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17 hours ago, Eatmywords said:


Just think, when the apocalypse comes and electricity is a distant memory you'll be so well prepared! 🔥🔥🔥

 

im pretty much a doomsday prepper level 10.. 

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33 minutes ago, BKEats said:

 

im pretty much a doomsday prepper level 10.. 

Except for the whole "living in NYC" thing, of course. :P

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1 hour ago, BKEats said:

I made these alkaline noodles the other day.. it involves using baking soda that was baked. you then dissolve like a tsp of the baked baking soda into a tablespoon of water and make noodles like you normally do... It adds a bounciness to the noodles... Completely transforms them from italian to chinese..   Anyway, i made the noodles and then a quick base for sesame noodles... it's my own adaptation... I add peanut butter, tahini, soy, black vinegar, chile oil, sesame oil, sugar and a little sichuan oil, garlic and ginger.. i like to add scallions but, it was in the downstairs fridge and I am lazy. 

 

 

Ha ha, we had similar ideas. 

Sesame noodles for us as well.

I didn't make noodles from scratch this time, but rather added the baked baking soda to the boiling water of plain old spaghetti. From my experience, both methods are quite effective, but the fresh noodles are bouncier. Also, if the soda is in the water, it can't be added to the dish (it's an italian technique, but I often utilize it to asian noodles), Sesame noodles obviously require no extra thickening, so no problem here.

My sauce sounds similar to yours. I used a darker tahini (Al Jamal) that is more similar in flavor to Chinese sesame paste (I like to use this brand for sweets, when I find it). Black vinegar, chili oil, garlic, ginger, five spice, Szechuan peppercorn, soy sauce, sugar, a pinch of MSG. Added some blached spinach, scallions and zha cai.

 

 

IMG_20200514_215246.jpg

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Last night was supposed to be split hot dogs on hamburger buns (trying to use stuff up), but Mr. Kim came home to work from home for the rest of the week and realized he'd left something at the office that he needed.  By the time we got back from downtown and stopped at a couple of grocery stores, it was too late to make anything.  So we did a dinner of Southern comfort 😄:

IMG_2284.jpg.aecb2d7043a304c5ed89bc77bab93b78.jpg

Popeye's sandwich, wavy chips, and glow-in-the-dark congealed strawberry and creme salad from a favorite local purveyor. 

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2 hours ago, BKEats said:

I made these alkaline noodles the other day.. it involves using baking soda that was baked. you then dissolve like a tsp of the baked baking soda into a tablespoon of water and make noodles like you normally do... It adds a bounciness to the noodles... Completely transforms them from italian to chinese..   Anyway, i made the noodles and then a quick base for sesame noodles... it's my own adaptation... I add peanut butter, tahini, soy, black vinegar, chile oil, sesame oil, sugar and a little sichuan oil, garlic and ginger.. i like to add scallions but, it was in the downstairs fridge and I am lazy

36 minutes ago, shain said:

 

Ha ha, we had similar ideas. 

Sesame noodles for us as well.

I didn't make noodles from scratch this time, but rather added the baked baking soda to the boiling water of plain old spaghetti. From my experience, both methods are quite effective, but the fresh noodles are bouncier. Also, if the soda is in the water, it can't be added to the dish (it's an italian technique, but I often utilize it to asian noodles), Sesame noodles obviously require no extra thickening, so no problem here.

My sauce sounds similar to yours. I used a darker tahini (Al Jamal) that is more similar in flavor to Chinese sesame paste (I like to use this brand for sweets, when I find it). Black vinegar, chili oil, garlic, ginger, five spice, Szechuan peppercorn, soy sauce, sugar, a pinch of MSG. Added some blached spinach, scallions and zha cai.

 

 

 

Wait, so you guys baked the baking soda at 250 for an hr (first google result)?  Then can use that to make scratch noodles or for dry pasta put it in the water and spaghetti for ex turns into a lo-mein like texture?

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That wasn't chicken

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When the avocado is ripe and the free tomatoes we got from Amazon Fresh (an out-of-stock sub for cherry tomatoes), we must have cold shrimp with the avocado and tomatoes, celery, carrots, and sweet potato tots just because.  The tomatoes were underwhelming.

 

shrimp-av.jpg.cc137ca423323bd7e80b623cd64e9cde.jpg

 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, shain said:

Sesame noodles for us as well.

I didn't make noodles from scratch this time, but rather added the baked baking soda to the boiling water of plain old spaghetti. From my experience, both methods are quite effective, but the fresh noodles are bouncier. Also, if the soda is in the water, it can't be added to the dish (it's an italian technique, but I often utilize it to asian noodles), Sesame noodles obviously require no extra thickening, so no problem here.

 

 

Good info. I have never done alkaline noodles myself and will give this a go as my entry point. I can buy them easily but the Pandemic is limiting shopping.


Edited by heidih (log)
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55 minutes ago, Eatmywords said:

Wait, so you guys baked the baking soda at 250 for an hr (first google result)?  Then can use that to make scratch noodles or for dry pasta put it in the water and spaghetti for ex turns into a lo-mein like texture?

 

Well, I dry heated it over the stove, low flame, before adding in water.

2-3 tsp per liter of water for boiling dry pasta, or 1 tsp per kg of flour for making fresh pasta.

I suggest making the powder in batch.

It's nice even in Italian pasta, on occasion (just make sure to wash the noodles and don't use the water).

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1 hour ago, shain said:

 

Well, I dry heated it over the stove, low flame, before adding in water.

2-3 tsp per liter of water for boiling dry pasta, or 1 tsp per kg of flour for making fresh pasta.

I suggest making the powder in batch.

It's nice even in Italian pasta, on occasion (just make sure to wash the noodles and don't use the water).

How long on the stove?  What happens if you skip the drying/baking?  Salt the water like for any western pasta?  

Thank you!


That wasn't chicken

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1 hour ago, Eatmywords said:

How long on the stove?  What happens if you skip the drying/baking?  Salt the water like for any western pasta?  

Thank you!

 

The original article/recipe calls for one hour of baking. I had good results with 30 as well. 

It works okish even raw, it's just not as alkiline so the texture and flavor are not quite as authentic. Chemistry wise, it breaks down into sodium carbonate. 

I add salt as usual.

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~ Shai N.

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Pork tenderloin marsala. Salad from the garden. The 4x5' box planter is making way more than we can eat from just one corner.

007.thumb.jpg.fb607dfb47d13b6a16f660997666b13f.jpg

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