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Toliver

Snacking while eGulleting... (Part 3)

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On ‎7‎/‎11‎/‎2016 at 11:29 PM, liuzhou said:

I found these in a local store this morning.

 

Beetroot Crisps.jpg

"Beetroot Crisps" according to the packet. I have never seen beetroot in China, but I love it, so I had to buy a packet to test. They are imported all the way from Uruguay, which seems a bit ridiculous.

Unfortunately, they were certainly past their best. It's a long, tiring trip.

 

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I'm crazy for beets prepared any way.

I ran across these while grocery shopping and picked up a package.

Not impressed, the flavor was quite mild and they weren't salty enough for my taste.  Too bad, a crispy, salty cracker tasting of beets sounded heavenly.

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I'm partial to Terra Chips, though I don't splurge on 'em often. Their standard mix includes beetroot chips, but they also have a "Sweets & Beets" mix with just beets and sweet potatoes. 

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I just broke open the package of Swad Methi Khari Biscuits I bought at my local Patel Brothers. These are really good and helped me to identify once and for all that unfamiliar, but altogether Indian flavor of the Indian food I've been eating in restaurants. It's fenugreek! Patel had bunches of fresh methi in the produce department, and since I did not know what it was, I tried one small leaf, and it tasted nothing like the dried stuff does. Not really much taste at all, and I cannot explain that, but I will definitely be seeking out some dried, as I love its bittersweet, earthy flavor. There was some in the curry powder I used in the vegetable stew I made the other day, and I knew I tasted something of the elusive ingredient, but there are many ingredients in my curry powder, so it provided no answers.

 

The ingredients in the biscuits are only a few: wheat flour (70%), hydrogenated vegetable oil (although it claims it has 0 grams trans fat 26%), salt and dried fenugreek leaves. These are really good, and the picture in the link does not do justice to what I received in my box. The layers are much more distinct like good puff pastry with that fenugreek flavor I like so much, but wasn't able to identify before today. This picture of Masala Khari Biscuits more accurately reflects the texture of what I bought. They need to invest in a good food photographer. Bonus, I only paid $1.49 for mine at the local Patel.

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9 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

@Thanks for the Crepes how does the taste of fenugreek leaves compare to the taste of the seeds?

 

 

I am operating on ignorance here. Now that I've identified this flavor I've had before, but never was able to name, I'll find out. Maybe some of the members more conversant with Indian spices and cuisine would be kind enough to enlighten us? @sartoric, @Kerala, I'm lookin' at you. :) Or anyone who has any knowledge in this area. I'm really interested, but feel like I am crawling around in the dark alone with this ancient and complex cuisine. I feel like I'm trying to learn a language where none of the characters of the alphabet (ingredients) are familiar. I would love to run with it, but that is a long way off.

 

I was delighted to find bunches of fresh methi in the produce department of Patel. It reminded me of the familiar clover plants we have here. I was very surprised to discover the mild taste. I'm used to fresh herbs being much more flavorful than dried. Dried basil, parsley and especially cilantro are not much worth fooling with. I guess fenugreek is more like rosemary which concentrates the flavor with drying. There's also a mention on Wiki about roasting the leaves to reduce bitterness and increase flavor, so maybe that happens in the drying process? I have to say I did not detect bitterness in the one little leaf I ate fresh from the produce dept. It is possible that with that tiny sample, it did not pass over my bitter receptors located in the middle of the back of the tongue, but I chewed it thoroughly trying to scope it out. I didn't want to just take (steal) :$ more. Some of the leaves had fallen off separate, so I just took one of those.

 

I'm also thinking about trying to make homemade fryums with besan flour and some wheat flour, without the sodium sulfate. That last might be the ingredient I found distasteful. There will be Indian spices involved, probably not the right ones at first, but I will learn eventually, I hope.

 

 

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On 16/06/2017 at 2:38 PM, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

I am operating on ignorance here. Now that I've identified this flavor I've had before, but never was able to name, I'll find out. Maybe some of the members more conversant with Indian spices and cuisine would be kind enough to enlighten us? @sartoric, @Kerala, I'm lookin' at you. :) Or anyone who has any knowledge in this area. I'm really interested, but feel like I am crawling around in the dark alone with this ancient and complex cuisine. I feel like I'm trying to learn a language where none of the characters of the alphabet (ingredients) are familiar. I would love to run with it, but that is a long way off.

 

I was delighted to find bunches of fresh methi in the produce department of Patel. It reminded me of the familiar clover plants we have here. I was very surprised to discover the mild taste. I'm used to fresh herbs being much more flavorful than dried. Dried basil, parsley and especially cilantro are not much worth fooling with. I guess fenugreek is more like rosemary which concentrates the flavor with drying. There's also a mention on Wiki about roasting the leaves to reduce bitterness and increase flavor, so maybe that happens in the drying process? I have to say I did not detect bitterness in the one little leaf I ate fresh from the produce dept. It is possible that with that tiny sample, it did not pass over my bitter receptors located in the middle of the back of the tongue, but I chewed it thoroughly trying to scope it out. I didn't want to just take (steal) :$ more. Some of the leaves had fallen off separate, so I just took one of those.

 

I'm also thinking about trying to make homemade fryums with besan flour and some wheat flour, without the sodium sulfate. That last might be the ingredient I found distasteful. There will be Indian spices involved, probably not the right ones at first, but I will learn eventually, I hope.

 

 

I think you've pretty much nailed it @Thanks for the Crepes, I haven't seen fresh methi in any produce stores yet, but we are growing some so I nibbled a leaf or two. It's not bitter like the dried version. I have kasuri methi (dried leaves) in the pantry, and use it in some recipes. It's mostly added at the end of cooking and imparts a fragrance to the dish, as well as a lovely bitter zing. As for the seeds, they are used sparingly at the beginning of a dish, either sizzled in oil or roasted in a dry pan then crushed. Thay add to the bitter undertone.

 

There's heaps of websites to help with your fryums (I've never seen one). A couple I like are veg recipes of india, and indian healthy recipes.

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New flavor for Milano cookies, pretty good. Really does taste like toasted marshmallow.

milano.jpg

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@BeeZee  

 

Yikes !  

 

thank you so much 

 

i probably have to loose 5 lbs ( more like 10 ! suprise.gif.5371521bc9af1be3000d428d452ad591.gif )

 

Melano's in Mint

 

with Ice Cold Milk

 

used to fit the bill

 

these might be right up there !

 

Id thank you ,

 

but, 

 

 

tongue-out.gif.16868c752d7ec74d2882ab74f3a5f0c5.gif

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@rotuts, they are marketing heavily...the grocer had shelves with all kinds of flavors. I've found I like the original flavor and raspberry...these were pretty good but I satisfied my curiosity and managed to make the pack last for 3 servings. I tried the salted caramel ones and found them disappointing. 

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Snacking today on the new Toasted Cheezits (so good!) along with a Smirnoff Ice because it's hot outside.(even tho I'm inside where it's pleasantly cool).  Any excuse will do.


Edited by lindag (log)
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I am currently snacking on "Lovely"-brand Dark Chocolate Coconut Chips purchased from Costco. 

That the coconut chips still have some crispness to them while enrobed in dark chocolate is nice. 

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Two slices of Muenster cheese. No crackers, no bread, just cheese. Because I had an English muffin with blackberry jam for breakfast, and needed something salty.

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Isn't it typical. Just yesterday, I mentioned to a friend that although nuts are common and so are raisins and other dried fruits, I've never seen mixed nuts and raisins on sale. I could buy each nut and each fruit separately to mix myself, but that required visits to several different shops.

 

This morning I go shopping and without deliberately looking find these in my local supermarket!

 

nuts.thumb.jpg.1a6ed3f45b78684bafd422a6ab491882.jpg

 

They have three different mixtures. Illustrated is mix A. I also bought mix C but haven't sampled it yet. I can't think why I didn't buy B. Tomorrow.

 

bsgs.thumb.jpg.26298e733e8fd388716549150679c096.jpg

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Is there a Mixed Nuts D, also? (And do the letters mean something, or were they just assigned in series as far as you can tell?)


Edited by MelissaH (log)

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16 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

Is there a Mixed Nuts D, also? (And do the letters mean something, or were they just assigned in series as far as you can tell?)

 

 

I didn't see a D. I guess they are just a series. Letters don't mean much in Chinese. They don't usually use letters other than to indicate a series.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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On 07/08/2017 at 9:06 PM, liuzhou said:

I can't think why I didn't buy B.

 

Oversight remedied.

 

598a9c7a03c25_nutsb.thumb.jpg.8f5a0c918dd05418a7484f0d28e05030.jpg

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I decided today to translate the ingredients lists of the three packets of mixed nuts. Just to confirm my suspicions. Once I found my magnifying glass. The small print is ridiculou8sly small.

 

Mixed Nuts A:

 

Cashew (the Chinese literally translates as kidney nuts)

Macadamia (literally Hawaiian nuts)

Walnuts

Black raisins

Green Raisins

Dried Blueberries

 

Mixed Nuts B:

 

Cashews

Almonds

Dried Cranberry

Black Raisins

Blueberry

 

Mixed Nuts C:

 

Walnut

Cashews

Almonds

Black raisins

Dried Cranberry

 

Not that it made much difference as I mixed A,B, and C together in one bowl.

 

abc.thumb.jpg.3fa796bacbb6bf709211e920df93be91.jpg

ABC


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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This was in honor of the eclipse.  I only bought them because they were aptly named Moon Cheese (got them off Amazon).  I had no idea how they would be.  Surprisingly, they are pretty dang good.  The ingredients list only cheese.  It's like crunchy dehydrated...maybe fried cheese?  Not greasy.  Not puffy like a cheese ball.  Sharp Cheddar, Gouda and Pepper Jack.

 

599c5a021b02b_photo315.JPG.f3af2a4ad657d5bcdf648892c57aec98.JPG

 

599c5a0b177c0_photo316.JPG.5a378335d0f3bee58f87a49a1a6104d5.JPG

599c5a13a05e6_photo317.JPG.cec6f3c3cd7a7391f94d367381ad39a9.JPG

599c5a1ec60e8_photo318.JPG.a9d692ed3448987511e3a44cfb7a01a5.JPG

 

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usually don't eat in front of the computer....

today some Fritos with a dip of mediocre  Dean's French onion dip supplemented by a spoonful of Bermuda onion marmalade.

now its off back to the outside to hang with the kitties and enjoy the day

 

gotta try that dehydrated cheese

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11 hours ago, suzilightning said:

usually don't eat in front of the computer....

today some Fritos with a dip of mediocre  Dean's French onion dip supplemented by a spoonful of Bermuda onion marmalade.

now its off back to the outside to hang with the kitties and enjoy the day

 

gotta try that dehydrated cheese

 

Linda,

 

If you can get Helluva Good brand French onion dip, it's worth giving it a try. It's still made with real sour cream, and very good, a few months ago when I got some. I can't finish the whole 12 oz. container by myself in time, but I'll tell you what, it beats the pants off Deans, which I think is made with oil and other gook you don't want in sour cream and onion dip. There isn't a significant amount of difference in the price either.

 

Helluva Good (yes, it is a real brand name) must be widely available, because unless memory fails (very possible), Anna and Kerry had purchased some on their latest excursion to Manitoulin.

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4 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Linda,

 

If you can get Helluva Good brand French onion dip, it's worth giving it a try. It's still made with real sour cream, and very good, a few months ago when I got some. I can't finish the whole 12 oz. container by myself in time, but I'll tell you what, it beats the pants off Deans, which I think is made with oil and other gook you don't want in sour cream and onion dip. There isn't a significant amount of difference in the price either.

 

Helluva Good (yes, it is a real brand name) must be widely available, because unless memory fails (very possible), Anna and Kerry had purchased some on their latest excursion to Manitoulin.

yeah... we can get Helluva Good around here....just too big of a tub for me(Johnnybird doesn't eat it). 

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7 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

Helluva Good

 

Ubiquitous here in New York state.

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Today I picked up a new to me product, Harvest Snaps Snapea Crisps. They are made by Calbee, North America and give a Boardman, OR address. I tried them tonight, and these are really, really good. The ingredients are: green peas, vegetable oil, rice, salt, calcium carbonate and Vitamin C. They are crunchy, but tender and made from what I think are whole dehydrated sugar snap pea pods. They claim, they're baked, but I'd call it more like dehydrated. The rice flour coating is thin. Maybe they are lightly baked after the peas are dehydrated and coated with rice flour? I paid $2.09 for a 3.3 oz/93 g pouch at Food Lion. It seems expensive, but dehydrated veggies and fruits seem to run that way. If anyone cares, they are Non-GMO Project verified as well, a tall order with vegetable oil these days. Highly recommended. 

 

I also really like Trader Joe's Green Bean Chips. I tried some from the Asian market before it went out of business that weren't as good as T.J.'s because they were harder, especially in spots, than T.J.'s product. I almost bought a huge tub of green bean snacks about the size of T.J.'s tubbed cookies at Harris Teeter. This was a bulk product with no branding except HT. I might give them a try next time. They seemed a bargain if they are any good. Has anyone tried the ones sold in the Harris Teeter produce department in big clear tubs?

 

Another thing that's an excellent if kinda expensive healthy snack is T.J.'s dehydrated strawberries.

 

Edit: Now that I think about it, I think the strawberries say they are freeze dried. That may be the case with the pea and green bean snacks too?


Edited by Thanks for the Crepes (log)

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TftC,  A friend gave me some once but they seemed to have a texture of an extruded chip. more like a cheese puff. Do yours break open like  peas would...this I would be very interested in trying.

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