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Pontormo

Absurdly, stupidly basic cooking questions (Part 2)

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hmm - how long does this bacterial takeover take to occur?

Like a millisecond? 10 minutes? a half hour?

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tryska: Under ideal conditions, many microorganisms can divide every 20 minutes. Each division doubles the number of microorganisms. If you started with one pathogen, the numbers would increase as follows (assuming no other constraints on microbial growth):

Minutes...............CFUs

0..............................1

20............................2

40............................8

60..........................64

80......................1,024

120...................65,536

180.............33,554,432

240..........1.37 x 10E11

CFU = colony forming units (number of wee beasties, in lay terms). Clearly, unrestrained division can lead to very large numbers of pathogens very quickly. Fortunately, the real world usually does provide constraints on microbial growth.

Still, I expect that taste factors trump pathogen risk, at least for the first hour or so. We have always assumed (probably without sufficient basis) that mushy crabs were dead before being cooked.

Edited to fix the lack of an exponent. How can one be a SSB without built-in superscripts or subscripts?


Edited by C. sapidus (log)
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interesting stuff C. Sapidus. thanks!

I was watching a clambake being done on Food Network the other day, and Saw them putting the live lobsters into the Steaming beach oven. For some odd reason that struck me as worse than being dropped into boiling water.

it's a shame there's no way, other than stunning them, to put em out of their misery before cooking them.


Edited by tryska (log)

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What is the difference between Wiener Schnitzel and Veal Milanese?

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interesting stuff C. Sapidus.  thanks!

I was watching a clambake being done on Food Network the other day, and Saw them putting the live lobsters into the Steaming beach oven.  For some odd reason that struck me as worse than being dropped into boiling water.

it's a shame there's no way, other than stunning them, to put em out of their misery before cooking them.

I found this technique yesterday when I wanted to dispatch 5 of the beasties with as little angst as possible.

Chill in the freezer for about 15 minutes, but do NOT freeze them. Obviously size will determine how long to chill them, but you are looking to slow down their reflexes, nervous system etc.

Then, lay the lobster on its back.

Take a large, sharp knife and quickly, forcefully insert the tip of the knife at the point where the tail joints the body, then make a quick clean sharp cut thru the body. The lobster just goes limp and then you can cook them as you want. The lobster has a decentralized nervous system so there will be some residual 'twitching'.

Sounds kind of gruesome, but actually, its pretty quick and seems more humane than being boiled to death.

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It's after nine at night and I don't feel like stuffing all the rest of the pasta.

I already have incorporated raw egg (approximately 1) into the remainder of one filling that contains chopped, cooked greens and cheese, one fresh, crumbly and the other aged and grated.

I know my unrolled pasta dough is fine, but am I endangering anyone's health and building up an evil bacteria farm if I leave the rest of the filling in a bowl as is and fill the remainder of these guys tomorrow?


Edited by Pontormo (log)

"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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What is the difference between Wiener Schnitzel and Veal Milanese?

As far as I understand, they are the same thing. It is said that although Wiener Schnitzel (Viennese schnitzel) was popularized in Vienna, it originated in Milano were it was called Cotoletta alla Milanese (source). In Argentina, the term Milanesa is used to describe a schnitzel made from veal, but also beef and chicken (source).

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It's after nine at night and I don't feel like stuffing all the rest of the pasta.

I already have incorporated raw egg (approximately 1) into the remainder of one filling that contains chopped, cooked greens and cheese, one fresh, crumbly and the other aged and grated.

I know my unrolled pasta dough is fine, but am I endangering anyone's health and building up an evil bacteria farm if I leave the rest of the filling in a bowl as is and fill the remainder of these guys tomorrow?

how cold has it stayed? and how clean were your hands when you mixed it? these are the questions that i think need to be asked.

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thanks hathor! i appreciate the technique!

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It's after nine at night and I don't feel like stuffing all the rest of the pasta.

I already have incorporated raw egg (approximately 1) into the remainder of one filling that contains chopped, cooked greens and cheese, one fresh, crumbly and the other aged and grated.

I know my unrolled pasta dough is fine, but am I endangering anyone's health and building up an evil bacteria farm if I leave the rest of the filling in a bowl as is and fill the remainder of these guys tomorrow?

Wouldn't it be more or less the same as a fresh mayonaise? That has raw egg and can last a few days without a problem.

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Actually, Hathor, I thought I just replied to MrJs, but must have hit the wrong button. Something about going back and forth between changing diapers and chopping greens...which was not true.

Seriously, though, since the situation was nothing like uncooked stuffing inside a raw turkey, I thought it would be okay except for the fact that I had prepped the greens the night before, moisture was building up, and the stuff had been sitting on the counter when the oven was on. After three years of chocolate mousse in my high school French club, I am not usually all that nervous about uncooked eggs; cf. comment re dough.

However, I did get a second wind and just wanted to get the task over. Making something probably very similar to what MrJs is about to attempt tonight, it went relatively quickly. In bed in time to get a full four hours sleep before the construction crew next door arrived and began its racket.


"Viciousness in the kitchen.

The potatoes hiss." --Sylvia Plath

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This week I got a trial box of mixed fruit from an organic delivery place. One of the fruits in it is a mango. I asked hubby, "You said you've eaten mangoes, what do you do with them?" "I don't know; they've always been cut up." *rolls eyes* So since I've only had it one or two times before, I come here: How do I cut a mango? Is the skin edible (I'm thinking no, it looks tough?) It's soft, about the stage I'd eat a peach or plum at, so I'm guessing it's ripe. I think they said it's a "Tomy Atkins" Mango - it's fairly small, certainly smaller than the canteloupe they sent.

Thanks for any advice! I figure if all else fails, I get out the chef's knife and see what's inside....


Joanna G. Hurley

"Civilization means food and literature all round." -Aldous Huxley

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I've heard it pronounced whee--bose. From a guy from South Africa.

he was probably rolling his r. i'm from s.a. too.

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This week I got a trial box of mixed fruit from an organic delivery place. One of the fruits in it is a mango. I asked hubby, "You said you've eaten mangoes, what do you do with them?" "I don't know; they've always been cut up." *rolls eyes* So since I've only had it one or two times before, I come here: How do I cut a mango? Is the skin edible (I'm thinking no, it looks tough?) It's soft, about the stage I'd eat a peach or plum at, so I'm guessing it's ripe. I think they said it's a "Tomy Atkins" Mango - it's fairly small, certainly smaller than the canteloupe they sent.

Thanks for any advice! I figure if all else fails, I get out the chef's knife and see what's inside....

Allura~

here is a good link to a step by step of cutting up a mango w/pictures

Mango Cutting

Mangos are delicious alone or combined with other tropical fuits in a salad (pineapples, papaya) or in a salsa with fish/seafood/pork/chicken.....

Tropical Fruit Salsa

both compliments of Wegmans !

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This week I got a trial box of mixed fruit from an organic delivery place. One of the fruits in it is a mango. I asked hubby, "You said you've eaten mangoes, what do you do with them?" "I don't know; they've always been cut up." *rolls eyes* So since I've only had it one or two times before, I come here: How do I cut a mango?

It's not difficult to cut a mango, once you understand about the pit. It is easier to show than to explain, so here's a web page with some photos:

How to cut a mango

If you decide you like them enough to get them often, you can invest in an OXO mango splitter, which really does work.

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Just a quick note about cutting mangos: the skin contains a compound related to the stuff that makes you itch in poison ivy. If you have sensitive skin, touching the outside of a mango may give you a rash. If this is the case, either wear gloves, or find someone less sensitive to do the dirty work. (My grandfather adored mango, but my grandmother always had to be the one who cut it up.)

Oh, and the fruit that's always left behind on the pit? In our family, that's precious stuff. It belongs to the one who wielded the knife, to be gnawed while leaning over the sink!

MelissaH

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MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

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Just a quick note about cutting mangos: the skin contains a compound related to the stuff that makes you itch in poison ivy.

A thousand years ago, we honeymooned on Kauai, where we discovered fresh mangos and ate quite a few. We didn't have a kitchen, so we were slicing the mangos open and eating them off the skin. I came home with a huge rash around my mouth that my (really, very loving!) family still laughs about. I wasn't laughing. :raz:


Life is short. Eat the roasted cauliflower first.

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What's the deal with Risotto? Why does it seem so popular in higher-end kitchens? How is it different than other rices (I think it's short grained). I have to admit, I've never made nor ate (at least not that I know of) Risotto. It just doesn't seem like a much used food item around here, but I see it all the time on cooking shows like GR's.

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What's the deal with Risotto? Why does it seem so popular in higher-end kitchens? How is it different than other rices (I think it's short grained). I have to admit, I've never made nor ate (at least not that I know of) Risotto. It just doesn't seem like a much used food item around here, but I see it all the time on cooking shows like GR's.

Risotto is made from a short-grain rice called aborrio. The traditional method invloves sauteing some garlic and little onion in olive oil, then sauting the rice like you would for a pilaf. The liquid is added a little bit at a time, stirring constantly until it's absorbed, then adding more liquid, repeat ad infinitum until rice is aldente. Cheese, cream, etc is added for flavor. The result is creamy and thick, more like a pudding than regular rice. It's popular because it's good! Although labor intensive, it is not difficult to make yourself.


-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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What's the deal with Risotto? Why does it seem so popular in higher-end kitchens? How is it different than other rices (I think it's short grained). I have to admit, I've never made nor ate (at least not that I know of) Risotto. It just doesn't seem like a much used food item around here, but I see it all the time on cooking shows like GR's.

Risotto is made from a short-grain rice called aborrio. The traditional method invloves sauteing some garlic and little onion in olive oil, then sauting the rice like you would for a pilaf. The liquid is added a little bit at a time, stirring constantly until it's absorbed, then adding more liquid, repeat ad infinitum until rice is aldente. Cheese, cream, etc is added for flavor. The result is creamy and thick, more like a pudding than regular rice. It's popular because it's good! Although labor intensive, it is not difficult to make yourself.

I'll second that! I just made risotto for myself for lunch today, and it looked something like this...

gallery_26775_1623_4406.jpg

That's a picture from a few weeks ago, from dinner, but I just made the same thing...took me about a half hour, and only a 1/4 cup of rice...


"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Thanks! While I'm asking - is aborrio much different from the short-grained rice used for sushi?

I believe it's less glutinous. Sushi rice would probably make a sticker risotto, but I could be wrong. Anyone on eGullet experimented with this?

When really craving risotto in odd hours of the morning, I've made it with regular short grain and once time medium grain in a pinch. I've found that these other rices don't obtain the al dente quality as well as aborrio, and are mushier. It was still tasty, just not really risotto.

Megan, that risotto you made looks fabulous! So nice and summery!


-Sounds awfully rich!

-It is! That's why I serve it with ice cream to cut the sweetness!

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Megan, that risotto you made looks fabulous! So nice and summery!

Agreed! What all is in it? Looks like corn, for one.

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i'm so embarrassed :(

what is sous vide cooking?  is it steaming at a low heat?

Actually it is boil in the bag in a vacuum pack bag, at very low heat. Lots of threads on it in eG.

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