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What Are You Cooking Sous Vide Today? (Part 3)


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14 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Sadly I seared the eye longer than optimum.  I think I'll stick to 55.0 which has worked well in the past.

 

Tonight I plan to cook the deckle but still undecided on the temperature.  There is a thread about cooking deckle but that was before sous vide ...at least before sous vide for me:

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/84171-deckle-a-long-overlooked-cut-of-beef/

  

 

Urk.. searing can be hit or miss sometimes. To crust or not to crust? to butter-torch or skillet bla bla so many choices.. ha ha ha

 

That older deckle thread seems to be more on a debacle on what to call the deckle--but a rose by any other name..

 

The ribeye cap is quite popular on the reddit sousvide channel, but please read these with a grain of salt; they have plenty of newcomers, but also some experienced folks:

https://www.reddit.com/r/sousvide/search?q=ribeye cap&restrict_sr=1

 

You can scroll down to see what these folks has done, quite a range of different temps, but they seem to do it at ~57-58C for a longer period of time.

I dunno--me and my wife like our prime ribeye caps prepped at 54, and not for long as well, so YMMV, and please let me know, interested in your results.

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On 10/18/2018 at 10:04 PM, Okanagancook said:

In the interests of controlling waistlines I wonder if they would Air Fry.

 

waistlines can also be controlled by portioning and skipping meals you know :) 

that's how we maintain our weight while eating pizza every other day har har har har ;) 

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I picked up a big bag of D'anjou pears at Costco.  Got home and realized "What am I going to do with all these pears?"   Off to internet, sous vide pears!   Peeled, halved and cored and 180F for 30 min.   Did not put any sugar or additions, just the fruit.  OMG, like pear custard but with a nice structure.  Will do this again.  I was going to add them to a gorgonzola and walnut salad, but decided they were dessert instead.

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4 hours ago, iggiggiggy said:

 

Urk.. searing can be hit or miss sometimes. To crust or not to crust? to butter-torch or skillet bla bla so many choices.. ha ha ha

 

That older deckle thread seems to be more on a debacle on what to call the deckle--but a rose by any other name..

 

The ribeye cap is quite popular on the reddit sousvide channel, but please read these with a grain of salt; they have plenty of newcomers, but also some experienced folks:

https://www.reddit.com/r/sousvide/search?q=ribeye cap&restrict_sr=1

 

You can scroll down to see what these folks has done, quite a range of different temps, but they seem to do it at ~57-58C for a longer period of time.

I dunno--me and my wife like our prime ribeye caps prepped at 54, and not for long as well, so YMMV, and please let me know, interested in your results.

 

I did the deckle 55C and seared all sides quickly* as hot as I dared bring the pan, maybe for a minute or a half, no more.  I was very pleased.  Perhaps contributing to the success, after I unbagged and wiped the meat I set it on a rack and used a hair dryer on it for several minutes.  I used a hair dryer (yes, I just got a new hair dryer, particularly for chocolate!) on the eye I cooked the other night, but for the eye I had only dried the surface briefly.

 

Of note with the drier meat surface I achieved a lovely crust without spattering grease all over my stove.  Makes me want to start a thread on hair dryer cookery.

 

 

*after disarming the smoke detector.

 

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On 10/18/2018 at 9:49 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

The local Shoprite is now selling Angus Prime brand beef, beef that is labeled USDA Prime.  I took home a nice looking ribeye.  Since I don't typically consume a whole steak in one sitting I dissected off the deckle.  Both portions are now bagged.

 

My question:  what temperature is optimum for deckle?

 

 

I SV deckle using sirloin numbers   IIRC  132 F x 5 hours

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And yesterday, and tomorrow: Belted Galloway short ribs. I took it off the bone to keep the dogs happy and resealed in two bags for 3 ribs. Stuck with Molecular Cuisine at Home's 58 degrees, even though I usually find I prefer a touch hotter than others. This was a quite meaty set so I hope the remaining un-rendered fat isn't too bad.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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Hmm. I have 2 packages of very large, very meaty, very fatty short ribs that I purchased for a special occasion and would normally braise. I wonder whether I should try one package sous vide instead?

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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17 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Hmm. I have 2 packages of very large, very meaty, very fatty short ribs that I purchased for a special occasion and would normally braise. I wonder whether I should try one package sous vide instead?

YES.  Check out Chef Steps for doneness...they have videos of the meat done at various times and temps to help decide which way to go...for @haresfur 

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29 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Hmm. I have 2 packages of very large, very meaty, very fatty short ribs that I purchased for a special occasion and would normally braise. I wonder whether I should try one package sous vide instead?

It's a very different result. I strongly prefer the flavor that develops with a braise in red wine with veg and spices. 

 

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5 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

That’s true.  A different result.  I try to make a really good sauce to go over the meat.

Yup. That's a great idea. SV short rib makes me think of roast beef. Which is good too. 

 

Braised short rib is self-sauced. I had a Geoffrey Zacarian short rib with Dates and 5 spice that was great... Maybe serve with fried polenta.....

 

Edited by gfweb (log)
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Last night I cooked chicken thighs in a master stock, recently refreshed with garlic, ginger and green onion...  These thighs will be featured in a Hainanese chicken rice later this week.  The stock that the chicken was cooked in will be boiled briefly and then have the impurities strained, and will go back into the master stock container and refrozen for future use... but some of the original stock was watered down a bit and will be turned into the chicken rice.

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13 hours ago, Smithy said:

Hmm. I have 2 packages of very large, very meaty, very fatty short ribs that I purchased for a special occasion and would normally braise. I wonder whether I should try one package sous vide instead?

 

We love sv short ribs.

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Here is a question out of left field.

Does anyone do 2 stage Sous Vide?

By that I mean cooking for say 40hrs  at 62C and then cooling in cold water and put in the fridge for a day or so and then repeating the cooking again for another 8 hours at 62C then proceeding as normal.

A couple of times I have had a longish cook and had plans changed and had to store in the fridge and to serve I just heated up to the original cooking temperate I thought the taste and texture improved. I normally did this just for a half hour to get some temperature into the meat prior to browning.

Could it be that the transition from cold (~6C degree) to the final cooking temperature (usually ~60 degrees ) actually re activated some enzymes or some such, but their effects might be more pronounced because of the changes that already occurred? 

One thing this allows is to cook several meals at one time. OK, its manual after the timer is set for the first meal but it means with the same run I could "overlap" and just put into the fridge.  

Of course after the first cook its necessary to cool fairly rapidly to avoid the dreaded safety/time temperatures for bacteria growth.

Edited by Bernie (log)
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On 10/22/2018 at 10:09 AM, gfweb said:

 

I SV deckle using sirloin numbers   IIRC  132 F x 5 hours

Love the temperature but if the meat is good quality i would drop the time to 1.5 hrs then seer in really really smoking hot pan (use beef fat instead of oil). Its going to burn so do it outside on a preheated grill. 5 hours seems long to me and the meat may become 2 tender. I prefer a little work for my teeth so I can savor the fat throughout the meat. Don't trim the fat either, just do a extra run around the block next week to make up😉

 If you cook a thick fillet steak and when tasting first cut off the outside "char" and just taste the pink meat itself, it has a very subtle flavor that is unique to each cut of steak .

That said, some of the best steaks I have eaten have been prepared in the normal way (seered then grilled in a hot oven then basted in butter...there is a cheffy term for it but alas I ain't no chef) then rested. They are mouth watering and delicious but a lot of the taste is because of the maillard reaction as well as the nuttiness of the browned butter. Not too many vegetables (and no strong flavors). Add a really good robust aged red wine and there is nothing better. I think I need to be alone now and will probably need a cigarette later (funny though I don't smoke).......

Edited by Bernie (log)
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On 10/21/2018 at 1:26 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

I did the deckle 55C and seared all sides quickly* as hot as I dared bring the pan, maybe for a minute or a half, no more.  I was very pleased.  Perhaps contributing to the success, after I unbagged and wiped the meat I set it on a rack and used a hair dryer on it for several minutes.  I used a hair dryer (yes, I just got a new hair dryer, particularly for chocolate!) on the eye I cooked the other night, but for the eye I had only dried the surface briefly.

 

Of note with the drier meat surface I achieved a lovely crust without spattering grease all over my stove.  Makes me want to start a thread on hair dryer cookery.

 

 

*after disarming the smoke detector.

 

The hair dryer is a novel idea! That should cut down on the amount of paper towels I usually use. ha ha ha

 

Let me attempt the next one using your approach. It sounds good on paper, now time to put the hair dryer to it :)  :) 

 

 

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5 hours ago, iggiggiggy said:

The hair dryer is a novel idea! That should cut down on the amount of paper towels I usually use. ha ha ha

 

Let me attempt the next one using your approach. It sounds good on paper, now time to put the hair dryer to it :)  :) 

 

 

 

Or use a heat gun for even more power.

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It's almost never bad to feed someone.

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I was gifted a two pound venison saddle which is almost two inches thick.

i plan on sous viding it for four hours at 127F then give it a good sear after its bath.

How does that sound to anyone out there who has done this size of saddle before?

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10 hours ago, iggiggiggy said:

The hair dryer is a novel idea! That should cut down on the amount of paper towels I usually use. ha ha ha

 

Let me attempt the next one using your approach. It sounds good on paper, now time to put the hair dryer to it :)  :) 

 

 

 

I'd wipe with paper towels first though.

 

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18 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

Or use a heat gun for even more power.

Turns out my wife doesn't want to share her hair dryer with a cut of filet mignon, so went to the toolbox, and did just that :D :D 

 

@JoNorvelleWalker: ended up doing that plus a heat gun for even faster results :) 

 

edit: forgot to mention, this is just to dry the surface before I sear-torch it on my lodge using the iwatani torch. super fast searing. I likes.

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I don't know where this should go, but since it is sous vide related (sort of) I am posting it here.  I like to keep a few things already cooked at hand for those odd days when I don't feel like cooking because I'm feeling  particularly lazy tired.  The 44th Street pot roasts are one such item.  Today I took it out of it's outer wrappers, turned it over to the bottom side and read this:

20181024_203844.jpg

 

Best set of instructions  I think I've ever seen.

Edited by ElsieD (log)
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 Bubbling away on my counter since yesterday evening are three gorgeous boneless beef short ribs (a much appreciated gift). This time I decided I would cook them for 48 hours at 62°C.  My Joule app tells me they will be ready at 5:18 tomorrow evening.  

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Haven't used SV for much recently.   Just did a couple boneless skinless chicken breasts  at 145 for a couple of hours.  My wife was looking for some options for her lunch.  She's not big on sandwiches so as a salad addition it works.  Me I love sandwiches but with little time for lunch today did a flour tortilla roll up with the said chicken with a smear of mayo and tomatillo sauce before heading out the door to get back to work 

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