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Cuisinart Combo Steam/Convection Oven (Part 3)


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I continue to be awed by this oven‘s ability to return crispy fried chicken to its original crispiness without sacrificing juiciness. Popeye’s chicken from my freezer reheated in the CSO at 350°F steam/bake for 50 minutes. 


719C76F9-5E20-4E37-B054-EEDED6E0DD67.thumb.jpeg.531d32603b5985fa62241e4859b22bd9.jpeg

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 hour ago, Anna N said:

I continue to be awed by this oven‘s ability to return crispy fried chicken to its original crispiness without sacrificing juiciness. Popeye’s chicken from my freezer reheated in the CSO at 350°F steam/bake for 50 minutes. 


719C76F9-5E20-4E37-B054-EEDED6E0DD67.thumb.jpeg.531d32603b5985fa62241e4859b22bd9.jpeg

Oh yeah...  a couple months ago, when prepping for a colonoscopy, my gastro recommended having a really big greasy breakfast the morning of starting the prep.  I interpreted that to mean only one thing - Popeyes!  But, my local branch doesn't open until noon, and I needed to have it at like 6AM.  I got it the day before and then refrigerated it.  Reheated it (and the biscuits) in the CSO worked perfectly... Love this oven!

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  • 3 weeks later...

With no experience with steam ovens, I've been directed to the CSO manual and @Okanagancook's excellent Excel spreadsheets (which are a compilation of recipes folks have posted to the CSO threads here). Because I'm new owner of an APO.

 

I'd like to understand the underlying rules for steam ovens in general and the CSO in particular.

 

In the Excel spreadsheet for CSO recipes, eG cooks chose both Bake Steam function and Broil Steam function to prepare Salmon.

  • Why would you choose one function over the other? What rules govern your selection?

 

Bake Steam defaults to 30 minutes @ 350F (180C), can be set between 225F to 450F (62C - 230C)

Broil Steam defaults to 10 minutes @ 500F (260C), can be set between 300F to 500F (62C - 230C)

  • Can one also increase or decrease cooking time in a function?
  • Do different parts of the oven come on in different function?
  • Are the cooking modes sequential or simultaneous? I.e. is there one long cooking mode using some amount of steam and the set temperature, or is there a "steam" phase and then a "dry" phase?
  • In other words, is the difference between Bake Steam and Broil Steam merely a "starting position" and, therefore, a Marketing button?

 

Are you aware of material (ebooks, blog posts, interviews) which discusses what the engineers were thinking about as this oven was designed? I'm looking for a description of the ACTUAL programming for the device.

 

Update of my status on APO thread.

Edited by TdeV
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17 minutes ago, TdeV said:

With no experience with steam ovens, I've been directed to the CSO manual and @Okanagancook's excellent Excel spreadsheets (which are a compilation of recipes folks have posted to the CSO threads here). Because I'm new owner of an APO.

 

I'd like to understand the underlying rules for steam ovens in general and the CSO in particular.

 

In the Excel spreadsheet for CSO recipes, eG cooks chose both Bake Steam function and Broil Steam function to prepare Salmon.

  • Why would you choose one function over the other? What rules govern your selection?

 

Bake Steam defaults to 30 minutes @ 350F (180C), can be set between 225F to 450F (62C - 230C)

Broil Steam defaults to 10 minutes @ 500F (260C), can be set between 300F to 500F (62C - 230C)

  • Can one also increase or decrease cooking time in a function?
  • Do different parts of the oven come on in different function?
  • Are the cooking modes sequential or simultaneous? I.e. is there one long cooking mode using some amount of steam and the set temperature, or is there a "steam" phase and then a "dry" phase?
  • In other words, is the difference between Bake Steam and Broil Steam merely a "starting position" and, therefore, a Marketing button?

 

Are you aware of material (ebooks, blog posts, interviews) which discusses what the engineers were thinking about as this oven was designed? I'm looking for a description of the ACTUAL programming for the device.

 

Update of my status on APO thread.

Bake steam uses both top and bottom heating elements with steam.  Broil steam just uses the top element with steam.  With any of the modes, you can set the time as long as you want.  In any steam setting, the machine initially gives a blast of steam and then adds more blasts of steam as time goes on.

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There are so many differences in how folks like their salmon. I do 325 F Steam Bake for about 12 minutes ...with out of the fridge salmon in the CSO

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1 hour ago, TdeV said:

With no experience with steam ovens, I've been directed to the CSO manual and @Okanagancook's excellent Excel spreadsheets (which are a compilation of recipes folks have posted to the CSO threads here). Because I'm new owner of an APO.

 

Congratulations on getting an APO, you'll love it.

 

I had a CSO and a BSOA, then I got the APO. The CSO has been relegated to the closet as with the APO it's pretty much redundant. I still use the BSOA but mainly to warm plates.

 

The main difference between the CSO and the APO is that aside from the programming the APO allows you to decide how much steam to use and when during the cook.

 

p

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APO vs CSO :

 

its size.  and that's it.

 

assuming construction and longev9ty i the same.

 

@palo 

 

I am keen on your take 

 

on when you use your steam , at what point and how much

 

etc.

 

"  APO allows you to decide how much steam to use and when during the cook. "'

 

good for you.

 

 

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7 hours ago, rotuts said:

APO vs CSO :

 

its size.  and that's it.

 

assuming construction and longev9ty i the same.

 

@palo 

 

I am keen on your take 

 

on when you use your steam , at what point and how much

 

etc.

 

"  APO allows you to decide how much steam to use and when during the cook. "'

 

good for you.

 

 

APO Pros:

 

More control over the process if you want to utilize it

 

It "appears" to pre-heat faster and gives you a running readout of interior temperature.

 

Built-in temperature probe that not only advises you as to the current interior temperature but is able to do it through the app. (I know, there's that dreaded Wi-Fi again )

 

Able to specifically choose the heat source, top, back, bottom or a combination.

 

Size really does matter, I found the CSO cramped and I'm just cooking for one and of course the small pan size and interior height.

 

Recessed heating elements makes cleaning a whole lot easier and the brighter interior helps.

 

Bread, haven't done this yet, but my readings seem to suggest huge oven-spring without the need for a pan of water or spritzing. More akin to the ovens professional bakers use.

 

The real-time monitoring of your cook through the app without the need to hover over the oven. Mind you as I posted in the APO thread the recipe called for too much time in the browning stage and had I not been on hand the potatoes would have been burnt.  (Page 28 last post)

 

 

 

It really looks nice!

 

Cons:

 

Price !!!  Price !!!  Price !!! 

 

It is a major investment. If you are upgrading it requires some thought, if you are starting fresh it's a no-brainer.

 

Size and weight - I had a stroke a few years ago and don't have the strength in one arm, but was able to wrestle it out of the box and onto the counter (I watched Kenji doing his "un-boxing" and figured if he could do it, I'd give a shot, I did have concerns mid-way through the transfer. As to the size, bigger height, width and depth means a major loss of counter space and will be influenced by your particular kitchen space (New Yorkers be warned 😛)

 

The use of steam requires a learning curve. I haven't reached it yet. I tend to think if I'm using a high temp then let's add some steam so things don't dry out, but if I'm at a lower heat and crispness is a concern then little or no steam. Just my take on it.

 

Longevity is definitely a concern. ANOVA has a good track record, but this is new product and while I don't feel it was rushed to market there will sure to be improvements to be made - cracking water tanks and warping pans come to mind. 

 

Some provided recipes for the APO seem to require more testing.

 

Still learning about this machine but I'm liking it.

 

p

 

 

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  • 4 weeks later...

I had some lobster tails that I wanted to do in the CSO because @Ann_T got such nice-looking results with hers.  I remembered that she mentioned doing them on Broil/Steam, but I didn’t look at her post until right before I was ready to cook them.  She hadn’t mentioned a time or temp and I figured it was too late to message her about it.  So, I checked the PDF table and for lobster tails it says to use the Bake/Steam at 210F for 20 minutes.  Bake/Steam doesn’t go that low in temp – at least on my machine.  So, I improvised and did it on Broil/Steam at 350F for 7 minutes.  I brushed with melted butter and sprinkled with S&P.  They weren’t up to temp (135F-140F) after 7 minutes.  So, I did it again and they were very slightly overcooked but tasted grand.  I’m guessing 10 minutes should do it. 

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  • 3 weeks later...

CSO experts: I got a pork shoulder roast to make this recipe:

 

https://thefoodcharlatan.com/cuban-mojo-marinated-pork-recipe/

 

(To summarize: marinate overnight, 30 mins at 425, then 80-90 mins at 375, pull when meat reaches 160)

 

I followed it pretty much exactly in the CSO, except I had it on convection bake. In the second phase, after about 45 minutes at 375 it was looking VERY cooked, so I took the temperature and it was about 200!

 

Fortunately it was still very tasty but definitely on the drier side. 

 

Was convection to blame? Should I have used steam bake for something like that? I was really hoping for crispy crust and juicy interior as in that blog recipe, but I haven't used my CSO for much except toast, cheesy things, and chicken, for which there are plenty of recipes here.

 

Thanks!

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51 minutes ago, Hassouni said:

CSO experts: I got a pork shoulder roast to make this recipe:

 

https://thefoodcharlatan.com/cuban-mojo-marinated-pork-recipe/

 

(To summarize: marinate overnight, 30 mins at 425, then 80-90 mins at 375, pull when meat reaches 160)

 

I followed it pretty much exactly in the CSO, except I had it on convection bake. In the second phase, after about 45 minutes at 375 it was looking VERY cooked, so I took the temperature and it was about 200!

 

Fortunately it was still very tasty but definitely on the drier side. 

 

Was convection to blame? Should I have used steam bake for something like that? I was really hoping for crispy crust and juicy interior as in that blog recipe, but I haven't used my CSO for much except toast, cheesy things, and chicken, for which there are plenty of recipes here.

 

Thanks!

 

Steam is your friend.

 

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9 hours ago, Hassouni said:

CSO experts: I got a pork shoulder roast to make this recipe:

 

https://thefoodcharlatan.com/cuban-mojo-marinated-pork-recipe/

 

(To summarize: marinate overnight, 30 mins at 425, then 80-90 mins at 375, pull when meat reaches 160)

 

I followed it pretty much exactly in the CSO, except I had it on convection bake. In the second phase, after about 45 minutes at 375 it was looking VERY cooked, so I took the temperature and it was about 200!

 

Fortunately it was still very tasty but definitely on the drier side. 

 

Was convection to blame? Should I have used steam bake for something like that? I was really hoping for crispy crust and juicy interior as in that blog recipe, but I haven't used my CSO for much except toast, cheesy things, and chicken, for which there are plenty of recipes here.

 

Thanks!

 

Steam vs non-steam aside, I have frequently seen advice elsewhere to reduce temperatures by 25°F when using convection on a recipe designed for a non-convection oven.

I would also probably tent a roast that big with foil in the CSO, as things get really intensely browned if they're close to the top heating elements.

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1 hour ago, dtremit said:

 

Steam vs non-steam aside, I have frequently seen advice elsewhere to reduce temperatures by 25°F when using convection on a recipe designed for a non-convection oven.

I would also probably tent a roast that big with foil in the CSO, as things get really intensely browned if they're close to the top heating elements.

This.

 

And yeah, I find things are done way faster than in regular ovens.

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All of the above. But esp because the small ovens keep the temp at the target better and just cook faster.  Convection not only cooks quicker but also evens out the oven temp so that the sensor triggers a heat cycle more quickly. 

 

I start checking for done-ness at 75% of the recipe cook times.

 

Dropping the temp from the recommended makes it more likely that you won't overcook the surface.

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Id leave a little time at the end

 

and change to conventional bake at

 

and increased temp to get the crispy-ness.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi everybody!

 

My wife and i currently reside in a coastal Florida trailer park on a barrier island and recently received our Canadian CSO-300N1C from Amazon.

 

Living full time in a small travel trailer we were looking to expand our mainly patio based cooking repertoire. Mostly we use a kamado style BBQ, 2 Anova sous-vide sticks and a single induction burner.

 

Having taken the time to read all three parts of this post I already feel like i know some of you a little.

 

Aside from the pan and grate that came with it we have two things that fit inside: An Emile Henry casserole and the lid from our (also new) lodge double dutch oven (photos attached).  We also have some 5 and 12 oz ramekins which I'm guessing we'll be using more often now with this little beast.

 

I'm looking forward to sharing our CSO experiments and experiences with y'all!

 

 

 

 

signal-2021-03-17-183805.jpg

signal-2021-03-17-183719.jpg

signal-2021-03-17-183729 (1).jpg

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Welcome @jetfin. Looking forward to seeing your CSO, and other, cooks.  Did you find the eGullet spreadsheet of CSO cook times and methods? If not, one of us will direct you to the link.

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58 minutes ago, curls said:

Welcome @jetfin. Looking forward to seeing your CSO, and other, cooks.  Did you find the eGullet spreadsheet of CSO cook times and methods? If not, one of us will direct you to the link.

Here.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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17 hours ago, jetfin said:

Hi everybody!

 

My wife and i currently reside in a coastal Florida trailer park on a barrier island and recently received our Canadian CSO-300N1C from Amazon.

 

Living full time in a small travel trailer we were looking to expand our mainly patio based cooking repertoire. Mostly we use a kamado style BBQ, 2 Anova sous-vide sticks and a single induction burner.

 

Having taken the time to read all three parts of this post I already feel like i know some of you a little.

 

Aside from the pan and grate that came with it we have two things that fit inside: An Emile Henry casserole and the lid from our (also new) lodge double dutch oven (photos attached).  We also have some 5 and 12 oz ramekins which I'm guessing we'll be using more often now with this little beast.

 

I'm looking forward to sharing our CSO experiments and experiences with y'all!

 

 

 

 

signal-2021-03-17-183805.jpg

signal-2021-03-17-183719.jpg

signal-2021-03-17-183729 (1).jpg

Hi, @jetfin!  We've put together a set similar to this.  I really like these because you can cook and store in them.  I use them a lot to steam leftover pasta/rice dishes in.  

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