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liuzhou

My 12 rules of food (warning: contains butter)

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“...there is no substitute for butter. I like toast on mine.”

she had me right there. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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That's a fun article! I may actually have learned a use for frozen peas, other than to keep my husband happy.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Posted (edited)

And always have frozen peas to use as a cold pack on strains and strains  Only first aid item that you can eat later on.


Edited by IowaDee (log)
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That's a great article, but I take exception to #12.

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Emphatically agree with No. 9.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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This bit of rule #8 is exactly correct:

 

While we’re on roast potatoes, always make twice as many you think you will need.

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"There is nothing like a good tomato sandwich now and then."

-Harriet M. Welsch

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Guess I better try carbonara before I turn 40 (again)  

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4 minutes ago, pastrygirl said:

Guess I better try carbonara before I turn 40 (again)  

 

I agreed with her assessment of carbonara, and like you I thought the age business was funny!


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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3 hours ago, ElsieD said:

That's a great article, but I take exception to #12.

LOL ...and here was I, thinking it's a good excuse to blow the dust off of my Instant Pot and cook up some chickpeas. :)

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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15 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

Of course, the best thing about the article is that she doesn't even mention the yellow pellets from hell. After all, it's an article about food!

 

Corn! Yum!

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I assume the fiery illustration is the fresh hell of corn, according to the Dante of eG.  Just make sure the fire is still burning when I grill my beautiful milk and honey corn that I brought back from the farmers' market this morning! Yum only begins to describe the thrill. Only two weeks into peak corn season and I'm already depressed about it being over. 

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I don't agree with #10. I need many cookbooks.

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Completely nailed frozen peas.  And Butter.  of course.

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re butter, and cream for that matter, we go through hoards.    Like Mary Poppins' teaspoon of sugar, a knob of butter or splash of cream can correct many a dish's missteps or shortcomings.    Our health/blood work hasn't suffered from this seeming extravagance.    We use almost no packaged foods or take out, and fast foods are once a month lunches.    There are a lot of ways to skimp in calories, fats and budget, but butter and cream are not mine.. 

On 7/15/2019 at 2:21 PM, TdeV said:

I don't agree with #10. I need many cookbooks.

 

Cookbooks are like a good friend with whom you feel loved and secure but one whose advisc you seldom take.   

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eGullet member #80.

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1 hour ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

re butter, and cream for that matter, we go through hoards.    Like Mary Poppins' teaspoon of sugar, a knob of butter or splash of cream can correct many a dish's missteps or shortcomings.    Our health/blood work hasn't suffered from this seeming extravagance.    We use almost no packaged foods or take out, and fast foods are once a month lunches.    There are a lot of ways to skimp in calories, fats and budget, but butter and cream are not mine.. 

 

Same here. Even at my broke-est, when my kids were growing up, we always had butter for table use no matter how we scrimped on everything else. It was that one little luxury that made everything else bearable.

 

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"The only questions that really matter are the ones you ask yourself."

Ursula K. Le Guin

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

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On 7/20/2019 at 1:50 PM, chromedome said:

Same here. Even at my broke-est, when my kids were growing up, we always had butter for table use no matter how we scrimped on everything else. It was that one little luxury that made everything else bearable.

 

This.  My mom was a single mom from the time I was 5 until she married my stepdad ( @Ted Fairhead) when I was 10.  We lived in a one bedroom apartment (she figured it was more important to live in a nice place than for us to have our own bedrooms).  We ate a LOT of hot dogs and spaghetti and fish sticks.  But butter was the spread she used.  

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During WWII, butter was essentially unavailable.     It was illegal in California for margarine to be colored; it was sold in solid blocks of white fat, accompanied by a yellow color capsule.    A lot of people used it straight from the package; my mother would use the coloring plus beat cream into it, then remold it into cubes.     She also saved "top milk" from our bottled milk (this, before homogenized milk) and churned butter when she accumulated enough.    The value of her effort taught us more than the value of either product.   

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eGullet member #80.

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My mom said it was her responsibility, as a child, to add the yellow coloring and mix it into the margarine for use by her family. She used margarine the rest of her life. 


 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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Not sure why, being in an area where having one's own dairy cow was not uncommon (we didn't, but my parents had done so before I was born, and many friends and relatives did), but we always had margarine when I was growing up, and I generally bought margarine when I was raising my kids. Now I buy nothing but butter, except for my daughter, who thinks butter tastes "too greasy." Well, OK, then.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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