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rotuts

Do you follow YouTube cooking vids ?

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i sometimes go down the rabbit hole and start looking at YouTube cooking vids.

 

An endless fork here to there etc.

 

recently Ive found a set

 

SousVide Everything which Im enjoying.

 

I avoid " SocialMedia " and " Subscribe " like the Plague.

 

however Ive ' subscribed ' to these as an experiment.

 

they seem to come at leasts once a week.

 

however  Im not sure what Subscribe means or accomplishes.

 

I wouldn't mind going to the site from time to time and See What's New

 

but as far as I can tell , having no YT skills at all

 

I can't even sort the group by date made   etc

 

anyone more YT competent than me ?   [ed.:  that's probably everybody here that's been to YT more than once ! ]

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I'm slightly farther along than you, but not much. I have learned that if I subscribe to a particular YouTube series I'll get a notification every time a new video comes out. The notification comes by email and as a notification to my Android devices. The notification methods can be adjusted, just as they can be adjusted for eGullet.

 

AFAIK the business of "following" someone benefits that person, but not you. The more followers someone has, the better their cachet. @gfron1 referred to this when he was looking to get his book published. He, @Franci and any number of other star members can asked more light on this aspect if they wish.


Edited by Smithy Added 2nd paragraph (log)
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Two thoughts on this. I subscribe to YouTube channels so that I can go to my page and see what new videos have been released without getting notifications.

 

From the perspective of the uploader, if they have ambitions for a book or paid videos or such then the more followers you have the better, but I don't think that's what the OP is getting at here. I think my former answer is more relevant.

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Posted (edited)

I subscribe to some.

Chefsteps, Sous Vide EverythingAlex French Guy CookingAlmazanKitchen, Country Foods, Mind of a ChefStaffCanteenJamie OliverBBQ Pit BoysTownsends (18th century cooking), Fine Dining Lovers—and many more.

 

AlmazanKitchen is probably the most unique.

It's a couple Serbian guys cooking, mostly, outside—in a forest.

Here they roast a chicken via the old string rotisserie trick.

 

Brief article on 'Country Foods' centenarian cook, 'Granny.'

MEET THE 106-YEAR-OLD YOUTUBE COOKING SENSATION

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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On You Tube, I really enjoy Man About Cake and his themed cakes as well as Lofty Pursuits' hard candy making.

 

The cakes are educational/inspirational, the candy is more just fun to watch.

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53 minutes ago, Smokeydoke said:

Food Wishes

 

Yeah, Chef John is comical.

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Lofty Pursuits is also one of my favorites.

I follow a Japanese chef named Itasan, I like him because he really patiently shows how to do everything correctly and I am trying to learn more Japanese dishes. His videos are 99% Japanese language, but, I think most of them are easy to understand by just watching the action.

I also follow a cool chef named Motokchi who has a tiny restaurant. Motokchi has a really fun attitude and rocks his tiny kitchen (which appears to be maybe 4'x6' in size). Japan has a lot of these small, non-chain restaurants, and I really enjoy them.

And then, there's Japan's Cooking With Dog, which is in English and designed for home cooks. (Regrettably, Francis has passed away. Try watching one of the older videos to get a better idea of his charm!)

 

For pastry Ciril Hitz's breadhitz page, has excellent tutorials.

Two of my friends, James Rosselle and Nicholas Lodge have a bunch of videos on the Craftsy channel.

 

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46 minutes ago, Lisa Shock said:

Motokchi

 

Yeah, I posted his omelette video in another thread some time ago. Quite amazing!

 

I've also followed 'Cooking With Dog.'

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Posted (edited)

@THS

 

thanks for that tip

 

I love it !

 

@DiggingDogFarm

 

Ive been watching Laura @ Kitchen for some time

 

enjoy it


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Posted (edited)

I also watch some of Matty Matheson's videos. He's up in Toronto. Some are kinda comical.

WARNING: Definitely avoid if you have a problem with foul language. LOL


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

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Posted (edited)

I'm fond of the genre that walks the line between travel video, guest experience, and documentary. Most of the videos are street food, or other forms of cooking where the food is prepared in front of the customer. High quality video with no real talking. Learn by watching. I can get lost in this type of video for hours.

 

 

 

That's from "Travel Thirsty." They have a ton of similar content, but is one of the videos I learned the most from.


Edited by btbyrd (log)
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2 hours ago, btbyrd said:

I'm fond of the genre that walks the line between travel video, guest experience, and documentary. Most of the videos are street food, or other forms of cooking where the food is prepared in front of the customer. High quality video with no real talking. Learn by watching. I can get lost in this type of video for hours.

 

I almost wet myself for that chicken skin.

 

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I sometimes watch food related videos on youtube when I'm researching something in particular but I'm not subscribed to any channels other than Kerry Beal's and Rob's (gfron1). 

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1 hour ago, btbyrd said:

You and me both, sister.

 

Don't get too excited.  At my age it doesn't take much to wet my pants.  Still, I had to study the whole thing.  At first I thought the chef was going to throw the skin away.

 

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Posted (edited)
12 hours ago, btbyrd said:

Learn by watching. I can get lost in this type of video for hours.

 Nice to see they are not afraid of their chicken. No gloves required. No concern with cross contamination. Raw and cooked meat on the same cutting board. Oh my! 

 

 Edited to add: and no constant and obsessive handwashing.


Edited by Anna N (log)

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Posted (edited)

All raw and semi-cooked chicken is cut on the wooden board with different knives than fully cooked chicken, which is cut on the plastic board with a different knife.

 

I also suspect that his chicken is probably much nicer to handle than most of the birds available in North American grocery stores. Until a few years ago, all I knew were the slimy, mushy, soggy wet-chilled, pre-brined from Big Corn/Soy and the USDA. They're totally gross. Unpleasant to touch, look at, and even smell, much of the time. Now I'm buying air chilled heritage breed birds that have been minimally processed/handled (and are twice as old when they die, though that's another matter). Those are a joy to touch, behold, and even smell (well, that last one is kind of an exaggeration, but sometimes....). But I'll start another thread here in a bit on yakitori so we don't get too far afield in this thread.


Edited by btbyrd (log)

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Isn't all that chicken butchery a thing of beauty. Oh to have access to such chickens. And the chicken skin, oh my. Thanks to @btbyrd for sharing, I've now subscribed. D

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On 5/20/2018 at 1:51 PM, btbyrd said:

I'm fond of the genre that walks the line between travel video, guest experience, and documentary. Most of the videos are street food, or other forms of cooking where the food is prepared in front of the customer. High quality video with no real talking. Learn by watching. I can get lost in this type of video for hours.

 

 

 

That's from "Travel Thirsty." They have a ton of similar content, but is one of the videos I learned the most from.

 

 

 

Here is my favorite Chicken cutting video!

 

 

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