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AnnaN  over in Lunch ! mentioned a book she is enjoying :

 

Salad Love

 

Blog:

 

https://www.lovemysalad.com/en/salad-lover/davidbez

 

so that got me to dust off  ( yep dust off    5669c511558e3_surprised.gif.de863c5b58a2  ) two of my much older salad books :

 

Lettuce in Your Kitchen

 

and 

 

Raising the Salad Bar

 

I give each a very high rating

 

I hope your library system might have a copy of each so you can take a Peek !

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I purchased Peter Gordon's Salads: Innovative Main Courses, Appetizers, Desserts, and More after reading recommendations on an older thread about salad cookbooks

I use it more for ideas than following exact recipes but I think it's worth taking a look at.

 

Both of the books @rotuts's mentioned, Lettuce in Your Kitchen and Raising the Salad Bar,  are also recommended in that previous thread, along with a few others.

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 The other salad book I am quite fond of is Salad of the Day, a Williams-Sonoma book.  It is a large format, heavy book that offers 365 salads presented month by month. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 4 years later...

Thank to a recommendation from @rotuts in, of all topics, Behold My Butt! I am now the proud owner of used copy of Lettuce in Your Kitchen: Flavorful And Unexpected Main-Dish Salads And Dressings, by Chris Schlesinger and John Willloughby. It's a fun book, and worthy of being noted (again) in this topic. So far I've made one of their fennel salads (Cary's Leaf Lettuce Salad with Orange, Fennel and Red Onion) although I took small liberties with it. The salad is great. The dressing is great. I have a bunch of other salads bookmarked to try.

 

One of the things I especially like about this book is that it categorizes and describes greens into classes: The Lettuces; The Mild spicy Greens; The Slightly Spicier Greens, and so on. Each recipe notes potential substitutions in case a specific green isn't available. Very, very useful.

 

20200611_161840.jpg

 

I know from the discussion around rotuts' comment that I'm not the only one to have purchased a copy recently. Has anyone else used it yet?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I've had mine for awhile. 

 

I discovered that, it turns out,  by the time I get to the salad, it seems that I am Done Cooking.  So while I've look at this book a lot, I haven't made a single solitary salad out of it.  

 

I think maybe I need to start the meal-planning with the salad portion.  If I did that, when I ran out of energy, this failing would arise with the meat.  \

 

Because meat can just, you know,  go under the broiler or in the oven, and be totally great.   Especially alongside a salad.

 

[Not having cooked from it], "Lettuce in Your Kitchen" is a fabulous book.  I enjoyed reading it.  

 

I bought one good other salad book which I gave away, I think it was the Williams-Sonoma book.  

 

And at the home of a neighbor,  I came across a third book which I would buy if there was any indication that I was going to actually bring some game to salad:  https://www.amazon.com/Salad-Dinner-Complete-Meals-Seasons/dp/0847838250/ref=sr_1_1?dchild=1&keywords=salad+dinner&qid=1591912215&sr=8-1

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This is a very good book.  Salads are classified in the T of C...main course meat, seafood salads, light leafy greens.  Lots of information about technique.  The dressings section make it easy to get a quick one the go.

 

With summer coming, it will stay out in the kitchen.

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5 hours ago, Smithy said:

 

I know from the discussion around rotuts' comment that I'm not the only one to have purchased a copy recently. Has anyone else used it yet?

Haven’t made anything yet from this book but have it on the kitchen table... need to start thumbing thru and picking out some recipes.

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Well

 

I have to add my recommendation to

 

a second Salad Book :

 

Raising the Salad Bar: Beyond Leafy Greens--Inventive Salads with Beans, Whole Grains, Pasta, Chicken, and More

 

consider getting it used .  I do

 

its a bit more conventional 

 

and has ore meat and fish.

 

nicely complementary for me.

 

Used is Good `

 

Im looking at that  book just now

 

and it ..................

 

good.

 

no worries 

 

i have a lot of BBQ top of the line books

 

for you

 

but just these two Salad Books.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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2 hours ago, heidih said:

I find that the older books and magazines show us that we are not "all that" on the innovation front. Old Sunsets from the 70's fit into today as an example

You mean hipsters didn't invent pickles?

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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4 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Shit, we were eating avocado and sprouts sandwiches when I lived in Santa Barbara -- free avocados from old, uncared about remains of orchards!

 

But I won't say how old I am.

 

Well the sprouts date ya ;)  I left the dog with my kid in a canyon once when he sprained ankle (the kid)- got back with help and dog was chowing down on "windfall avos". Supposedly not good for canines but he was a big dog.

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  • 5 months later...

I've just hit a stumbling block with my copy of Lettuce in Your Kitchen (eG-friendly Amazon.com link). The recipe for "Regulation Caesar Salad with Lots of Garlic Croutons" calls for 2 large eggs in the dressing ingredients. The first instruction says 

Quote

1. Slip the eggs into a small saucepan of boiling water and boil for just 2 minutes. Remove the eggs from the water and crack the yolks into a small bowl. Add all remaining dressing ingredients and whisk to combine. Set aside.

 

Does that mean that the whites will be firm and I'll have only yolks running out after I crack the eggs? If so, am I to do something else entirely with the cooked whites? I can't find this issue addressed anywhere in the recipe. I'm making another dressing for the time being, since I'm loath to possibly waste a couple of eggs.

 

Advice, anyone?

Edited by Smithy
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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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17 minutes ago, Smithy said:

Does that mean that the whites will be firm and I'll have only yolks running out after I crack the eggs? If so, am I to do something else entirely with the cooked whites? I can't find this issue addressed anywhere in the recipe. I'm making another dressing for the time being, since I'm loath to possibly waste a couple of eggs.

 

Advice, anyone?

Here's a guide to egg timing:

https://norecipes.com/perfect-boiled-eggs

  • 2 minutes – The white isn’t fully set and the yolk is totally raw.

And I think it's usually just the yolks used in a Caesar dressing, so you would have the partially cooked whites left over. 

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8 hours ago, FauxPas said:

Here's a guide to egg timing:

https://norecipes.com/perfect-boiled-eggs

  • 2 minutes – The white isn’t fully set and the yolk is totally raw.

And I think it's usually just the yolks used in a Caesar dressing, so you would have the partially cooked whites left over. 

So if the yolk is completely raw why cook it in the first place? Many Caesar salad dressings call for (uncooked) egg yolks. Is this some sort of attempt at pasteurization to avoid salmonella? I’m just curious.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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