J_Ozzy

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  1. Can't really help with scaling, other than to recommend doing so, by weight, with a decent kitchen scale. Ratios should be ratios, as long as potency is consistent. For any processing that does not involve cooking, flash infusion with an iSi whipper (or soon, centrifuge via a Spinzall); let gravities or the compression/decompression cycle do the work on the quantity of reagents you've chosen to use. Freezing can be tricky; you may not get back what you put in (separation, ice crystal damage), but it's unlikely to kill you once thawed if it wasn't poisoning you before hand. The produced ingredients with low shelf lives are often most vulnerable to oxidation, so keeping them isolated (pumped out bottle or inert gas layer) and refrigerated might stretch that out. Liquid Intelligence by Dave Arnold discusses some of this, and is an otherwise great read; I'd highly recommend it.
  2. It's a pretty noticeable difference. Licor 43 is much more vanilla-forward in nose and body, and Galliano has wintergreen / herbal flavours that are much more prominent. Licor 43 is also a fair bit sweeter. If Licor 43 is prominently featured in the cocktail, you're going to end up with something quite different from a balance and flavour perspective. For example, a Tijuana Lady made with Galliano doesn't deliver the same experience as one made with Licor 43. Tijuana Lady 1.5 oz Tequila 1 oz Licor 43 3/4 oz lime juice 2 dash Angostrura They stock it in Alberta, if you have friends or family who might visit from out West; otherwise it's a suitcase import until it lists again.
  3. Looking ahead using Amazon's listings, I see a few books I'll be picking up in 2017: Meehan's Bartender Manual (Meehan, October 10th) Three-Ingredient Cocktails: An Opinionated Guide to the Most Enduring Drinks in the Cocktail Canon (Simonson, September 26th) A Spot at the Bar: Welcome to the Everleigh: The Art of Good Drinking in Three Hundred Recipes (Madrusan and Young, March 7th)
  4. Regarding Cocktails (Sasha Petraske with Georgette Moger-Petraske) I never met Sasha Petraske, but knew of him by reputation and, much later, visits to his establishments. (I hope he would forgive me the false familiarity of referring to him by his first name, but “Sasha” in cocktail circles is indelibly his). I knew he was important to the cocktail bartending revival, but I never fully understood the degree of impact he had on the scene (both directly and through the people he fostered) in those critical early years. As recounted by those who knew and worked with him, Regarding Cocktails collects a series of guides, recipes and essays which serve as testament to his character and influence. The sections authored by Sasha include instructions for setting up a home bar and successfully running a cocktail party; theory on garnishes; the Milk & Honey comp policy; a tantalizing intro to 'Cocktails For Your Cat'; and bookended, fittingly, by Milk & Honey's closing menu. The recipes section, for me, really drove it home. 70+ elegant, dialed-in, formative classics and modern classics incubated through his beverage programs. Many of my favourite modern drinks (a number of whose origin I hadn't realized) saw first light under his tutelage. Each recipe is accompanied by graphical representation of the drink makeup, and accompanied by the story of its genesis (or perfection, in the case of classics) as told by people involved. The guides section includes contributions from Wonderich and Alperin, among others, and covers a wide range of topics, providing a personal perspective on the man and (mostly) genuinely useful information. Throughout the book, Moger-Petraske provides essays, anecdotes and quotes that bind the narrative together. I can't imagine the challenges tackling such a project, but I'm thankful that she did. I am left with a deeper sense of appreciation for the man, his establishments and his extended bartending family. And a little (selfish) sadness that I'll never get to meet him.
  5. Prime reading season for me right now (Canon, Regarding Cocktails, and Tippling Bros all arrived in my mailbox in the same week). Canon arrived first, so that's what I've managed to tackle so far. The Canon Cocktail Book: Recipes from the Award-Winning Bar (Jamie Boudreau & James O. Fraioli) I very much enjoyed this book. It reminds me, in spirit, of a modern Harry Johnson's Bartenders' Manual, but weighted to more heavily to the drinks (to be fair, that original was a treatise for bars, restaurants and hotels, fully half its length an operator's manual). It covers a lot of ground: tips on planning, opening and running a cocktail bar; core cocktail theory; high-end equipment and substitutes; carbonated, aged, and bottled cocktails; shrubs, infusions and tinctures; flavored foams, Fernet cookies and Chartreuse ice cream. The drinks are nicely photographed, often alongside their vintage spirit or liqueur bottles. Drink descriptions helpfully explain less common ingredients, and (in the case of riffs) provide insight into the creative process behind them. The drinks are organized in broad categories, and stylistically run the gamut from elegant tweaks (Chrysanthemum #2) to playfully themed (The Elvis Ziggurat) to full mad scientist (Movie Night Float). Refreshingly, outside of the "Over the Top" section, there are very few recipes that require much more preparation than an infused syrup. There is a mix of standard, advanced and exotic (brain rum!) prepared ingredients, including the always-appreciated house Picon substitute, Amer Boudreau. Some of the exotic preparations call for specialized equipment, but conventional workarounds are provided for the truly adventurous. Outside of the drink recipes, the book provides a quality, high-level introduction on many craft cocktail topics. It doesn't delve nearly as deeply as some of the more specialized books (i.e. fundamental technique in Morgenthaler's Bar Book, or advanced wizardry as presented in Liquid Intelligence or The Cocktail Lab). It is instead an accessible, competent generalist, and an engaging read.
  6. Just noticed that Regarding Cocktails (Sasha Petraske) is getting a late October release. Definitely going on my required reading list.
  7. Just got my copy yesterday, so I'm still working my way through it, but I agree that Hamilton Jamaica black is the intended bottle for the Dr. Funk. It is indeed (relatively) unaged, black, pot still, and Jamaican, which hits all the qualifiers. It's also the only pot still rum listed on the referenced page (198).
  8. Looking forward to the year ahead, I see a few interesting titles coming down the pipe: Two Italian-focused narratives: Spritz: Italy's Most Iconic Aperitivo Cocktail, with Recipes Aperitivo: The Cocktail Culture of Italy And 3 bartender-backed tomes: Lift Your Spirits A Celebratory History of Cocktail Culture in New Orleans (Chris McMillian) Smuggler's Cove: Exotic Cocktails, Rum, and the Cult of Tiki (Martin Cate) The Canon Cocktail Book: Recipes from the Award-Winning Bar (Jamie Boudreau) I'm particularly looking forward to the Canon book , since I haven't been able to find a copy of The Pacific Northwest Gentlemen's Companion.
  9. A few "can't buy them at home" purchases from a holiday trip to NY: Maker's cask strength, barrel-aged peach brandy from Peach Street Distillers, and Pineapple Stiggins from Plantation/Maison Ferrand [Host's note: this topic forms part of an extended discussion that grew too large for our servers to handle efficiently. The conversation continues here.]
  10. Amari

    Well that's going on my Christmas list.
  11. Just finished the Experimental Cocktail Club book. It weaves the back story of the various ECC establishments with a selection of drinks (gorgeously photographed) that have graced their menus. I particularly liked that they included a section towards the end highlighting drinks from friends and former staff who have gone off on their own paths; I thought it was a nice touch. Also of note is the Classics section, which presents established drinks alongside their in-house variations, explaining the tweaks and substitutions and providing some insight into their process. I think this book slots in quite well as high-intermediate material. One page near the back covers some quick pointers on technique. Just under half of the drinks include some sort of homemade syrup (beyond simple, honey, orgeat or falernum), infusion, or tincture. Homemade ingredients are described either as they are introduced in a drink, or in the longer recipe section at the end. Most of the homemade ingredients show up in more than one drink, and the longest has a lead time of 72 hours, keeping the investment of effort reasonable. As learning material, I'd recommend it to someone who's solid on Morgenthaler's Bar Book, but might be overwhelmed if they jumped right into The Dead Rabbit or Death&Co. I think its stands up well as a cocktail bar book in it's own way, since it's a multi-venue story rather than the history of a single space.
  12. I'm on a bit of a mission to replicate and improve Quebec's equivalent of Pimm's Cup, Caribou. Notes so far: • The commercial bottling tastes like fruity red wine sangria. • The official recipe calls for port, sherry, vodka and brandy, (roughly 2:2:1:1) batched to ~36oz. • Many of the house recipe I've seen are simply for "St-Georges" (a local value-priced fortified wine) and alcohol in ratios ranging from 3:1 to 2:1 • There's also various call for accents of cinnamon, clove and anise, citrus, or cider I'm looking to scale it down to a decent single serving recipe; thinking of playing with the brandy and the fortified wines (if necessary, sub down to a fruity red), with a dash or two of ango and peychauds for the spice notes.
  13. Dave Arnold suggests no longer than 2 hours ahead of time for cucumbers in Liquid Intelligence
  14. Anyone have any thoughts on how Bigallet China-China stacks up as a substitute for the original 78 proof formula? I've been seeing it used quite widely here in Montreal as the go-to.
  15. I visited the Riverwalk location during Tales 2008. They had a really well provisioned exhibit; lots of donated/lent cocktail paraphernalia. The pre-revolution bottles of Bacardi and 19th century bottles of absinthe were really neat to see up close.