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Thanks all. I did use olive oil and a scant amount of Dijon. I will definitely use actual anchovies next time. It’s resting in the fridge for a bit right now. Not great but definitely good enough for a first attempt. 
 

And you all are right about the garlic— I knew better. Oh well this is how you learn. 

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I use a mini-blender. 

rather classic . . . olive oil+yolk+white wine vinegar+dijon+garlic+anchovy filets x 3-4 or more....I like 'em

 

but I don't add the parm to the dressing - I grate it off a block at home.  no green can stuff.

sprinkle on romain prior to dressing.

 

curiously ... of late I have been using extra virgin olive oil (Kirkland).  it quite noticeably makes for thicker/creamier than my usual olive oil.

don't know why or the mechanics of it - but it makes a serious difference.

 

edit to add:  the mustard acts as an emulsification "aid" - I don't recommend going light on the Dijon.

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Actually, if I may be a little more pedantic (cause why not).

 

The original Caesar salad contained no anchovies; that taste came from the Worcestershire sauce.

 

And zero mustard.

 

It originated in Mexico, a hotbed of neither anchovies nor mustard.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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Just now, weinoo said:

Actually, if I may be a little more pedantic (cause why not).

 

The original Caesar salad contained no anchovies; that taste came from the Worcestershire sauce.

 

And zero mustard.

 

It originated in Mexico, a hotbed of neither anchovies nor mustard.

 

No argument whatsoever.

But I find that a breath of dijon not only emulsifies but rounds out the taste without making it a bit mustardy. Also lets the sauce sit  a while without separating.

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3 minutes ago, gfweb said:

 

No argument whatsoever.

But I find that a breath of dijon not only emulsifies but rounds out the taste without making it a bit mustardy. Also lets the sauce sit  a while without separating.

 

Absolutely - and don't get me wrong, I use more mustard nowadays (after our last trip to Paris) than ever before. I love it.

But as a pedant...

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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8 minutes ago, weinoo said:

Actually, if I may be a little more pedantic (cause why not).

 

The original Caesar salad contained no anchovies; that taste came from the Worcestershire sauce.

 

And zero mustard.

 

It originated in Mexico, a hotbed of neither anchovies nor mustard.

 

We even used this. My boys liked it.  https://caesarcardinis.com/products/cardinis-the-original-caesar-dressing-12-oz/

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Quick question— grilling clams now and romaine soon to follow. Can I store this dressing? Most of the sites I’ve read advice against it but is that them just being overly cautious? Could I use it tomorrow? 
 

TIA. 

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18 minutes ago, weinoo said:

 

Oy.

 

Children need a gentle intro at times. Oy you. They are snarfing up uni now - it is a process.(yes typical processed food scary ingredient list) Cracked fresh -not treated on the cute pine tray.

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24 minutes ago, MetsFan5 said:

Quick question— grilling clams now and romaine soon to follow. Can I store this dressing? Most of the sites I’ve read advice against it but is that them just being overly cautious? Could I use it tomorrow? 
 

TIA. 

The concern is the uncooked egg. I would use it after a day in the fridge. Probably not a lot more than that. 

But thats my compulsive phobic self

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I think I’ll toss it. I have all or more than enough ingredients to make it again. We did enjoy it. 
 

  Sorry for the paper plates and crap picture but we did enjoy 3 dozen clams off the BGE along with the Caesar. 
 

697E0AD9-89C6-4F1D-9C4D-3EBC449B22B8.jpeg

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I'm in the lots of garlic and anchovy camp - whenever I used to get it tableside (which is a lot when I was a kid) the wooden bowl wasn't just rubbed with garlic, the waiter used a fork and made a paste of garlic and anchovy over the 10 minutes of rubbing.

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Not necessarily for yours, @MetsFan5 (which looked delicious, BTW), but just to add to the mix, the best Caesar I ever made was a Geoffrey Zakarian recipe.  It is a fairly classic (though with anchovies and mustard, not perfectly authentic) recipe and the big difference it seems to me is the use of white anchovies.  They were a bitch for me to find, but they made the salad.  I'm not particularly picky when it comes to Caesar salad - I've enjoyed practically every version I've tasted, but this is a truly special one.  

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7 hours ago, Kim Shook said:

Not necessarily for yours, @MetsFan5 (which looked delicious, BTW), but just to add to the mix, the best Caesar I ever made was a Geoffrey Zakarian recipe.  It is a fairly classic (though with anchovies and mustard, not perfectly authentic) recipe and the big difference it seems to me is the use of white anchovies.  They were a bitch for me to find, but they made the salad.  I'm not particularly picky when it comes to Caesar salad - I've enjoyed practically every version I've tasted, but this is a truly special one.  

 

No No NO!  That's just a gussied up, cheffy recipe. Though he does have nice hair.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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9 hours ago, KennethT said:

I'm in the lots of garlic and anchovy camp - whenever I used to get it tableside (which is a lot when I was a kid) the wooden bowl wasn't just rubbed with garlic, the waiter used a fork and made a paste of garlic and anchovy over the 10 minutes of rubbing.

 

See - I think the way to get that garlic flavor into a Caesar salad is via the croutons and rubbing the bowl. Mashing garlic and anchovies as part of a dressing works really well when dressing a truly bitter green like puntarelle; not so much on romaine.

 

This reminds me of watching the Italian chefs watching people making various sauces; and that overuse of garlic as well.

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2 hours ago, weinoo said:

 

See - I think the way to get that garlic flavor into a Caesar salad is via the croutons and rubbing the bowl. Mashing garlic and anchovies as part of a dressing works really well when dressing a truly bitter green like puntarelle; not so much on romaine.

 

This reminds me of watching the Italian chefs watching people making various sauces; and that overuse of garlic as well.

Maybe.  In all the restaurants where I used to have it (back in the mid to late '80s mind you) all of them made a paste with the garlic and anchovy with a fork in the bowl.  I don't think I saw any of them just rub the garlic on the bowl.  So I have no idea if a rubbed garlic would be better or not.

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5 minutes ago, KennethT said:

Maybe.  In all the restaurants where I used to have it (back in the mid to late '80s mind you) all of them made a paste with the garlic and anchovy with a fork in the bowl.  I don't think I saw any of them just rub the garlic on the bowl.  So I have no idea if a rubbed garlic would be better or not.

 

I associate the garlic rubbed bowl with 80's wooden bowls - t'was a thing.

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While this is not at all even close to the real thing, my go-to for a simple week night salad dressing based on the Caesar - but (hold your gasps now) without the cheese (we try to be healthy during the week).  I make a paste of garlic and salt, then put in the bowl with lemon or lime juice and a few splashes of fish sauce (this kind of gives the hint of the anchovies).  I let the garlic marinate in the acid for a while while I get the rest of dinner going.  Just before plating, I'll whisk in some extra virgin olive oil, then dress and plate.  Is it as good as the Caesar of my memories?  Absolutely not.  Is it fast and tasty - sure is.

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32 minutes ago, robirdstx said:

 

As a graduate of Peter Kump's cooking school way back when (he was such a nice guy), I'd pretty much agree with everything he says - and NO MUSTARD, but both Julia and Jim call for coddling the egg.

 

And let's face vis-a-vis garlic. Your clove does not necessarily equal my clove. Like I'm getting this garlic right now that is local, super fresh, and with very large cloves. To use a whole one of these cloves, mashed, in a Caesar, would basically ruin that salad.

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Not really a traditional recipe, but the Kale Caesar Salad which is in the Food Lab cookbook is one of the best salad recipes I've tried, and I feel one of the best recipes in that entire book. I was super skeptical the first time I made it, kale can be so so for me, but it works perfectly in this application. It is the only salad recipe the rest of the family bugs me to make with any regularity, despite none of them really liking kale or anchovies a whole lot. There are 4 of us, and that entire recipe for 6 - 8 gets completely devoured every time.

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46 minutes ago, Yiannos said:

Not really a traditional recipe, but the Kale Caesar Salad which is in the Food Lab cookbook is one of the best salad recipes I've tried, and I feel one of the best recipes in that entire book. I was super skeptical the first time I made it, kale can be so so for me, but it works perfectly in this application. It is the only salad recipe the rest of the family bugs me to make with any regularity, despite none of them really liking kale or anchovies a whole lot. There are 4 of us, and that entire recipe for 6 - 8 gets completely devoured every time.

 

Yes good. - I only like it with the Lacinto /Tuscan kale. I prefer Melissa Clark's take on Franny's version in in Brooklyn. No mayo, no W.   https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/11746-tuscan-kale-salad

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I like the Zuni Cafe recipe for Caesar Salad. Very traditional. The only change I make is to reduce the eggs from two to one. Seems like plenty. Also I use pecorino or piave cheese, since I typically have one or the other on hand. The anchovies I get may be saltier than some, since I never need to add salt.

 

https://www.bigoven.com/recipe/zuni-cafe-caesar-salad/713610

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