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NancyH

Heirloom Beans by Rancho Gordo (Steve_Sando)

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12 hours ago, SLB said:

What are the orange flecks?

 

Diced carrots


Its good to have Morels

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Totally agree re RG hominy. I am about to make a traditional Posole Rojo in the next few days. I have a mix of pork butt and pork neck bones and a variety of dried red chiles. Although I have not inspected my stash, most likely there are some anchos and some guajillos. When I lived in NM my good friend's dad was the posole master. He cooked the whole thing in a 60's era crock pot (you can picture that, right?) and always served the red chile sauce at the end, to be added to each bowl to taste. I've never been able to duplicate his red chile. It was the best.

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I have a pound of Marcellas in the IP as we speak, the centerpiece of a big pot of bean and Italian sausage soup. It's cold outside, and that sounded good.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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9 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

Totally agree re RG hominy. I am about to make a traditional Posole Rojo in the next few days. I have a mix of pork butt and pork neck bones and a variety of dried red chiles. Although I have not inspected my stash, most likely there are some anchos and some guajillos.

Quote

When I lived in NM my good friend's dad was the posole master. He cooked the whole thing in a 60's era crock pot (you can picture that, right?) and always served the red chile sauce at the end, to be added to each bowl to taste. I've never been able to duplicate his red chile. It was the best.

 

My daughter lives in ABq...NM      completely chili driven.   


Its good to have Morels

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1 hour ago, Paul Bacino said:

My daughter lives in ABq...NM      completely chili driven.   

You're lucky, you get to visit NM! Have you been in the fall during roasting season? My daughter lives in Atlanta and I don't love visiting that city. BTW, your daughter will tell you: don't spell it with an "i"--in NM it is chile! Bowl of red, bowl of green, it's all good. Although I have to admit that I can't handle it as spicy as I used to.  
 

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9 hours ago, Katie Meadow said:

You're lucky, you get to visit NM! Have you been in the fall during roasting season? My daughter lives in Atlanta and I don't love visiting that city. BTW, your daughter will tell you: don't spell it with an "i"--in NM it is chile! Bowl of red, bowl of green, it's all good. Although I have to admit that I can't handle it as spicy as I used to.  
 

 

Correct   ---wine moment    :)

 

YES for the fall roast  ..   We go to the Corrales area cuz They live in Rio Rancho and its not to far.  I'm making Posole today..with the hominy..  I'll shoot a pic later.  Cheers  Doc


Its good to have Morels

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BTW...for the best posole in the world, I highly recommend @Chris Amirault's recipe, here. It was the first posole I ever made, and remains the only posole recipe I've ever used. It's pretty dang marvelous.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Well this is my Posole in a pork Gaujillo base but not dressed up yet

 

46135437265_fd7ac702c9_b.jpg

 

46325106874_0dea618b7e_b.jpg

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Its good to have Morels

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Stopped by Rancho Gordo store in Napa while on vacation in CA.  I got stupidly lucky to stumble upon @rancho_gordo birthday celebration.  Steve was very nice and agreed to have a photo taken with me and my newly acquired beans (rebosero, Ayocote negro, Moro, Lila).

 

C4276F27-61B6-4D19-919E-0CDDC80E713E.thumb.jpeg.f1b0c36b96bbda42f6ce2a0421c0c951.jpeg

13555DBE-7AEB-4F03-B6E9-A870C17F30C9.thumb.jpeg.ba05bf655ad4307e495973329dabcff9.jpeg

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