Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Heirloom Beans by Rancho Gordo (Steve_Sando)


Recommended Posts

On 12/7/2019 at 2:47 PM, TdeV said:

I've just received my Instant Pot and have successfully steamed water. 😛

Now I'm thinking of doing some of the beans from the last Rancho Gordo club shipment in the Instant Pot.

Could I please have some instructions about how to long to cook them? Soak first, right?

And what to cook them with?

I do soak mine--over night  --sometimes quick soak- sometimes never /  I have pressure cooked alot of beans.  Beans your not familiar with,  I incremental cook them about every 15 mins.  till you get it correct with that type of bean..  IE  Royal coronas can take up to 45mins to an hr.  Yellow eyes may only take 15 mins after soak.  Just example.  I always soak my bean with some type of Miropix--I also add beyond bollion some time s too--or minimally garlic and onion..

 

FWI-- some beans  may not even take 15 mins  --   ( probably the bigger the bean the longer the cook / and if the beans are a bit older )

Quote

 

 

 

Edited by Paul Bacino (log)
  • Thanks 1

Its good to have Morels

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

Two boxes landed on my doorstep together this afternoon:  my bean club shipment and a new cookbook, Cool Beans: The Ultimate Guide to Cooking with the World's Most Versatile Plant-Based Protein, with 125 Recipes by Joe Yonan

Must be a sign!

 

Hope there are no wildfires near you.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

I got my beans today!  

 

I am not complaining because they were all ok since they are in plastic bags, but I can't believe they made it.  The box was a day late.  It came wrapped in a saran-like plastic.  The box itself was falling apart and soaking wet.  The labels are falling off the bags it was so wet lol.  I always wonder what happens in transit.

  • Sad 4
Link to post
Share on other sites

OK all you enablers.  While reading this section on Stupid Bowl Sunday I ordered some beans.  I'll try to figure out who to cook for and what to cook with them as HIMSELF doesn't like to eat beans as he "expresses himself" .   

Uhhhhh…. trust me when you drink beer you do the same.😛

  • Haha 6

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

Link to post
Share on other sites

@JoNorvelleWalker, unless you're working with a recipe, you just pick random.  If you sweat the selection, you'll keep saving them.  Just pick random.  

 

**one thing to note:  I separate out big beans, which I prefer to use in salads in summer.  And I separate out lentils, which I also pretty much confine to summer.  And, finally, I separate out the black-eyed peas, which I don't usually eat except for new years (no reason for this -- I would eat black-eyed's year round, but now with all these other beans, it just seems . . . unnecessary).   

 

So there's not usually the full-twenty to pick from.  Randomly.    

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/3/2020 at 8:12 PM, TdeV said:

Rancho Gordo Spelt (Farro Grande) in the Instant Pot

 

Did this spelt last night (Dinner thread here). Two go-rounds: first 12 minutes High Pressure with 20 minute rest, second 4 minutes HP with 15 minutes rest. They were nominally still underdone but left in the pot at ~160F for 5 or 10 minutes.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/8/2020 at 10:22 PM, SLB said:

And, finally, I separate out the black-eyed peas, which I don't usually eat except for new years (no reason for this -- I would eat black-eyed's year round

 

I recently found out that my sister who abhors coffee and eggs, eats black-eyed peas every morning for breakfast, and has for years. It's probably healthy, but how she got there is a mystery to me?

  • Like 2
  • Haha 1

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

 

A colleague at work mentioned she had quit the bean club.  She was inundated by more beans than she could eat.

 

 

I am not quitting, though I am also inundated. I often wish there was a Bean Club Lite version with half the amount we receive. Two people just can't eat that much.

  • Like 3

Deb

Liberty, MO

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Over two more nights I boiled the Moro beans into submission.  They were eventually quite good.  As would have been pebbles cooked that long.

How hard is your water? When we were in Belgium for three months on sabbatical, we tried cooking beans once, and they didn't soften after being soaked overnight and then boiled for a couple of hours. We did some research and discovered that the tap water in our area was high in calcium. After that, we looked carefully at all the bottled water labels and chose one that was much softer to lug home and cook our beans. It worked beautifully.

  • Like 1

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Maison Rustique said:

 

I am not quitting, though I am also inundated. I often wish there was a Bean Club Lite version with half the amount we receive. Two people just can't eat that much.

 

Unfortunately, Steve can correct me, I think it comes down to shipping costs.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, MelissaH said:

How hard is your water? When we were in Belgium for three months on sabbatical, we tried cooking beans once, and they didn't soften after being soaked overnight and then boiled for a couple of hours. We did some research and discovered that the tap water in our area was high in calcium. After that, we looked carefully at all the bottled water labels and chose one that was much softer to lug home and cook our beans. It worked beautifully.

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/136349-do-brita-type-filters-work/?do=findComment&comment=2162319

 

For the soak and initial cook I used my double filtered deionized tap water.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Too many beans. What a great problem to have! 

The Bean Club isn't for everyone. You do get a few exclusives and maybe a little more attention but "a la carte" makes more sense for many people. 

 

The current club ends up being 1/2 a pound a week. A lot of Bean Club people order more than that. It really is for the fanatic, in the best sense. 

Our problem is that we're a relatively small company. After this holiday season and then the Bean Club plus a lot of press out of the blue, another model isn't practical for the foreseeable future. We just expanded to 8,500 ,members (from 5,000) and we thought that would be that. It sold out in a matter of days. We have well over 5,000 on the waiting list and a very low "churn" rate. It's not for everybody but it seems to be great for those that love it. 

Remember, we have dozens and dozens of the same beans available on the website for you to get as you like. 

 

Just today Evan Kleiman on KCRW's Good Food did this:
<https://www.kcrw.com/culture/shows/good-food/mcdonalds-in-black-america-and-cool-beans/food-nerd-alert-beans-are-trending>

I will tell you, after 19 years of pushing and working hard, I will never get used to this recognition. It's surreal and wonderful and I am old enough to understand that not everyone gets to work and and be rewarded. I am one lucky fellow. 

Edited by rancho_gordo (log)
  • Like 13

Visit beautiful Rancho Gordo!

Twitter @RanchoGordo

"How do you say 'Yum-o' in Swedish? Or is it Swiss? What do they speak in Switzerland?"- Rachel Ray

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ha do not be shy You have given people bean education and are doing good work.  When I tell some of my former employees from Mexico  (Mostly from Michoacan and Oaxaca) about your work they get wide eyed and can not believe people care.

Edited by heidih (log)
  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By mixmaster b
      I am interested in getting some cookbooks that cover the basics of pastry and baking--not bread, necessarily, but dessert, cakes, cookies, etc. I searched a few other cookbook threads but did not have luck on finding books on pastry.
      My interest is in fairly classic French and European style baking, and I need a book that covers technique. Pictures would also be much appreciated--I like both the step by step pix or great pictures of the end product.
      Right now, I have Desserts and Chocolate Desserts by Pierre Herme. (I love these and have had good results from the recipes, but feel I should start with a more classic approach.) La Varenne Pratique has provided some good starting points, but I would like to find a book with more focus on baking.
      I was thinking about the Payard book. Any comments? Suggestions would be much appreciated! In case it applies, I am a home cook and am slightly more skilled than a total beginner.
      Thanks!
    • By liuzhou
      Congratulations are due to Fuchsia Dunlop, whose "Food of Sichuan" has just been published in a Chinese language version - a rare honour here. I've ordered a couple of copies as gifts for local friends who loved the Engish version, but struggled with some language issues.
       

      《川菜》,
      中信出版社。
       
       
    • By Brooke Dojny
      Fried Clams (From the New England Clamshack Cookbook)
      Serves 4 as Appetizer.
      Reprinted with permission from The New England Clamshack Cookbook by Brooke Dojny, 2003

      Vegetable Oil or solid white shortening for frying, such as Crisco
      2-1/2 pt shucked, medium-sized whole-belly soft-shell clams
      1-1/2 c evaporated milk
      1-1/2 c yellow corn flour
      3/4 c pastry flour, cake flour or all-purpose flour
      tartar sauce
      lemon wedges

      1. Heat the oil or shortening over medium heat in a deep fryer or heavy, deep pot until it reaches 350 degrees F.
      2. Rinse the clams gently if they are muddy, and dry on paper towels.
      3. Pour the evaporated milk into a large bowl. In another large bowl, stir together the corn flour and pastry flour.
      4. Using your hands, drip about one third of the clams into the milk, letting the excess liquid drain off. Dredge the clams in the flour mixture, using your hands to make sure each clam is evenly coated. Transfer to a colander or large strainer and shake gently to remove the excess flour.
      5. Slide the clams into the hot fat and deep-fry until golden brown, 2 to 4 minutes, depending on the size of the clams. (Cooked clams can be kept warm in a slow oven while you finish the remaining frying.)
      6. Serve with tartar sauce and lemon wedges.
      Keywords: Seafood, Appetizer, American
      ( RG468 )
    • By David Ross
      Over the years I've collected both cookbooks and a large collection of what I call cooking "booklets." These are small booklets that were often mailed or given out free at grocery stores.  Most of them measure 5 1/2" x 8 1/2".  My Mother had a large collection, and I've bought many of them, for a few cents each, at vintage shops and estate sales.  I think my Mother would often clip something out of the newspaper food section or a magazine and send it in to the sponsor for the booklet.  Magazines like Sunset and Better Homes and Gardens printed a series of these booklets. 
       
      They're a historical record of the way we cooked and ate at the time, but I also find them a great resource for creating new recipes today.  I'll start by posting the Metropolitan Cook Book printed by the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company.  Often there wasn't a published date in these cook books, but based on the recipes compared to my collection of vintage cook books, I'd say this one dates to around 1915.  Many of the recipes are similar to what I've found in the Fannie Farmer Cookbook of that time.  
       
      There is a section of recipes titled "Invalid" recipes, where one could have things like Oatmeal Gruel, Irish Moss Lemonade and a Raw Beef Sandwich.  Under the "Lunch Box" section, there is a suggested cold lunch for "Industrial Workers"-
      1 minced ham sandwich with white bread
      1 Swiss cheese sandwich with rye bread
      1 whole tomato
      1 apple dumpling
      1 cup coffee (in Thermos)
       
      For "School Children"-
      1 cottage cheese sandwich on brown bread
      1 jelly sandwich on white bread
      1 apple
      1/2 pint bottle of milk 






    • By Mutleyracers
      Hi all. I hope you are well. I am just into baking bread due to lockdown and need help. Ideally I would like modernist bread but the wife is not quite agreeing to that yet. So I would like some where to start for now until she comes around to the idea. After she has tasted all my amazing breads I make. 
       
      I would like this to be in metric rather than imperial.
       
      Thank you 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...