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andiesenji

Unusual & unknown kitchen gadgets

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31 minutes ago, David Ross said:

Spending time at home this week and so I decided to go through the gadget drawer to keep myself busy.  Found this odd orange tool that I've never used.  I happen to have a penchant for buying gadgets at Asian markets, but then stow them away and never use them.  I figure this must be a carrot cutter due to the orange color, and probably to cut carrot ribbons.  Well either my technique is bad or the tool is bad, but it actually made something that surprised me and I think is more creative than a carrot ribbon.  This is a carrot "flower" with a grape tomato bud.

 

Kinda reminds me of a pencil sharpener.

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17 minutes ago, David Ross said:

I still use some old gadgets that were my Mother's and even Grandmother and Great Aunt.  Like a little wire whisk and an old flour sifter.  Thing is got some bits of rust on it and looks like it was made in 1910 but it still works great.

I have my great-grandmother's pastry wheel (cutter & crimper) which is certainly still usable, but I'm reluctant to actually employ it. I can't help but feel that use and washing would do it no favors, because of its vintage (WW1 era...I also have my great-grandfather's regimental tobacco pouch from the same time frame).

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

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1 hour ago, David Ross said:

And it works like one!

 

1 hour ago, David Ross said:

And it works like one!

 

Reminded me of the zucchini noodle twister. And for nostalgia the pencil sharpener mounted for some odd reason on our garage shelf 

 

pencil.JPG

z.JPG

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54 minutes ago, heidih said:

 

 

Reminded me of the zucchini noodle twister. And for nostalgia the pencil sharpener mounted for some odd reason on our garage shelf 

 

pencil.JPG

z.JPG

My Grandfather also had a pencil sharpener attached to his work bench in the garage. I guess he must have used it to sharpen pencils when he was measuring wood to cut and make something.  That zuchinni gadget is interesting.

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On 2/8/2020 at 8:55 AM, Margaret Pilgrim said:

This cooking mold is cast iron, well seasoned on top but bottom reveals crude finish or grain.    The indentations are very shallow, maybe 1/3" deep. at  most

1876207360_photo2-1.thumb.JPG.daac9f8d1d0a8bed5ed3aaefcdcfd905.JPG   1615939777_photo1-1.thumb.JPG.3ad767f25c95d7376a0a1bca68139b2c.JPG

 

History:  I had read about a SouthEast Asian snack made in a dimpled stovetop pan.    So when I fell over this at a flea market for $1., I couldn't turn it down.    It's been kicking around for maybe a decade, and of course I've forgotten the story behind the original incentive.  

 

Anyone know what this really is, what it's for and where it's from?   

 

 

 

It looks like a very old Takoyaki pan.   I have a very old one that has flattened sections, smaller than yours and rather crudely made to be used on a brazier. 

1449212755_Octapuspancopy.jpg.8fddce4115e854858e92c9eee217259a.jpgI have had this one for about 20 years, handles shape like octapi  to indicate the use, just in case a person wasn't sure.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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That is s stunning piece, Andie.  Wonderful patina and delightful shape!    Thank you for this.   Have you ever used it?   


eGullet member #80.

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4 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

That is s stunning piece, Andie.  Wonderful patina and delightful shape!    Thank you for this.   Have you ever used it?   

No. Someone gave it to me because I used to collect cast iron and liked odd things.  And this was quite odd.  I have sold most of my cast iron. I have a couple of skillets  left.  A Volrath a later Griswold and a couple of griddles, an actual abdelskiver pan and this. i was going to put in on ebay but never got around to it.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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