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Darienne

Who makes your birthday cake? (I do.)

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The subject heading says it all.  Today is my birthday and as usual I am making my cake.  Sunday is Ed's birthday and so at this point, we are sharing this cake.  And, of course, I have made cakes for our children, our parents, and all sorts of friends.  

 

A dear friend dropped over this afternoon with a plate of brownies as a gift and on her birthday, I always make her a new version of a peanut butter and chocolate pie.  

 

Imagine a wonderful cake bought from a terrific bakery...I don't think we have any terrific bakeries in the small city near us.  We lived in it for 25 years and now 23 years outside it, and I sure don't remember any good bakeries.  Or imagine having someone else make you a birthday cake.  Fair to boggles the mind.  

 

Who makes your birthday cake?

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My favorite cake for my birthday is an ice cream cake from the store.

DH's was German chocolate cake.

Now that he's gone I have go get my own if I want one.

Better check the freezer space first.

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Nobody... not even me. I don't make myself a cake, I don't buy myself a cake and I'm fine with nobody making me a cake. I'm not a birthday humbug. If somebody does something, I'm a good sport about it and it's appreciated. It's just not something that's all that important to me.

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First off, a very happy and joyous birthday wish to @Darienne !!!  

 

As for cakes, I LOVE making cakes- for me and anyone else.   Now, for surprise birthday parties- which my hubby is notorious for throwing -  he opts for the DQ ice cream cakes.   

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Happy Birthday, Darienne. 

 

You share a birthday with my oldest daughter.

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I make mine, and everyone elses!

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Happy belated birthday, Darienne, and happy early birthday, Ed! My birthday is Monday, and I MIGHT make myself a coconut cake, but likely won't. I'm more likely to go get myself a birthday watermelon. I have been known to use an ice pick to put holes in the rind for candles.

 

Might set the melon on fire, though. Think I'll skip that.

 

 

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48 minutes ago, kayb said:

Happy belated birthday, Darienne, and happy early birthday, Ed! My birthday is Monday, and I MIGHT make myself a coconut cake, but likely won't. I'm more likely to go get myself a birthday watermelon. I have been known to use an ice pick to put holes in the rind for candles.

 

Might set the melon on fire, though. Think I'll skip that.

 

 

And a Happy Birthday to you kayb for Monday.  

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And then there are those of for whom a birthday cake is meh but a birthday pie or cheesecake - now you're talking. Pies are purchased, cheesecake is home made by my DW, the baker in the family.

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1 hour ago, kayb said:

Happy belated birthday, Darienne, and happy early birthday, Ed! My birthday is Monday, and I MIGHT make myself a coconut cake, but likely won't. I'm more likely to go get myself a birthday watermelon. I have been known to use an ice pick to put holes in the rind for candles.

 

Might set the melon on fire, though. Think I'll skip that.

 

 

And then there is the fad of making a hole and pouring in strong booze to marinate...

 

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1 hour ago, heidih said:

And then there is the fad of making a hole and pouring in strong booze to marinate...

 

Now that one sounds good.

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I have plugged a watermelon or two. Birthday and otherwise.

 

 

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Happy birthday @Darienne, and Ed, and @kayb!  Hope they were wonderful!

 

Husband and child both prefer ice cream cakes because of the chocolate crunchies and if I could buy just those I think they would be more than thrilled ;) Despite everything that I make, I don't have a particular favorite so I don't usually do a dessert on my birthday.  However, this year, I asked our local fishmonger (who makes a really nice lobster dip but only for holidays, it's not available otherwise) if he would  make some (he said he would) and that will be my birthday "cake" :)!

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I make my own if I want one. I use it as a experiment for something I’ve wanted to try or test out. 

Plus, I make everyone else’s as well. Since I do it for a living, I’m kinda doomed 😋

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I try different bakeries. Last year, I had a really big cake, so I cut it into slices and individually double wrapped them in plastic wrap, foil, and then plastic wrap and foil and froze them. I took most of the slices to work, maybe 75% of the cake, and stuck them in the freezer there. The freezer was mostly empty, and had plenty of space. Three days later, the teenager who cleans the fridge out once a week threw them all away because, "they were wrapped in foil, ew!"

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