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chileheadmike

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    Lexington, KY

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  1. chileheadmike

    The Disgusting Food Museum

    Ketchup.
  2. chileheadmike

    Switching to commercial convection oven?

    They were blodget free standing ovens. We always had the fan on. I was just suggesting that if the OP had never used one there may be the option to use it without the fan.
  3. chileheadmike

    Switching to commercial convection oven?

    All of the commercial convection ovens I used had a switch for conventional/convection. Of course, it's been a few decades since I worked in a restaurant kitchen. I didn't that that would have changed. I stand corrected.
  4. chileheadmike

    Switching to commercial convection oven?

    Conventional simply means that the fan isn't on. The ovens have multiple racks. You don't have to bake on sheet pan at a time. I'd rotate the pans to different racks and turn them once or twice during baking using convection or not. These ovens tend to have hot spots.
  5. chileheadmike

    Switching to commercial convection oven?

    Given the constraints, you may want to cook without the fan going. All of the convection ovens I've used would bake conventionally. Sounds like you don't really have time to experiment.
  6. I've been buying from Sweet Maria's for over 10 years. Very happy with them. ETA: Welcome. My dad was also Eugene P.
  7. chileheadmike

    Most Useless Kitchen Items and Utensils

    I was talking with a friend over the weekend who said he was going to make "tater-pigs". I'd never heard of such a thing and asked him what it was. He said he drills out the center of a baker and fills with raw sausage, onion and cheese, then bakes. I asked him what he uses to drill out the spud. "My electric drill." Seems his drill bits are cleaner than mine.
  8. One of the places I worked at called their burritos burros. Because they were bigger than burritos.
  9. Someone on another forum I read asked for a recipe for chile verde. It's a Kansas Jayhawk sports forum so I go into more details than I would on a cooking forum. I used to manage a Mexican restaurant in Lawrence and this is fairly close to what we were serving. I like to use pork shoulder for this, I think it has better flavor than loin. It will take longer to cook and it does have some more fat in it. You can probably get country style pork ribs. But make sure they are from the shoulder also called the butt. Trim them off of the bone and trim away any large pieces of fat. I use an enameled cast iron Dutch oven for this. It’s heave and works very well for long, slow cooks. If you don’t have one, get your heaviest Dutch oven. It will hold heat well and help prevent scorching. 2+ Lbs diced pork Olive oil 1 onion 3 or so cloves of garlic A ton of roasted, peeled and diced green chiles (some hatch chiles are very hot, the ones I got this year are not. Dice up a couple of serranos if you need more heat) Flour Salt and pepper Spice mix of onion powder, garlic powder, black pepper, cumin, and oregano (Mexican if you have it, use Mexican oregano very sparingly, strong stuff.) Chicken stock. Homemade is best, a box of Swanson’s is fine. _________________________________________________________________________________ Heat Dutch oven over medium heat. Once the pork is trimmed and diced into bite sized pieces, give it S&P, be generous. Toss in some flour. Add some olive oil to the pan, coat the bottom and then add the pork. Don’t crowd, if you do, the pork won’t brown. It may take two or three batches. Once the pork is browned, remove from the pan. Lower heat Add onions and chiles. Sir this and scrape up the brown bits (fond) from the bottom of the pot. Keep cooking until the onions start to clear, then add your garlic and spices. Probably a tablespoon of each except if you are using Mexican oregano. If you’re using that, just half a teaspoon and crunch it up in your hands before you add it. Stir, stir, stir for a minute or so. You don’t want the garlic to burn. You may need to add a touch more oil, then add a couple of tablespoons of flour and stir some more. For about a minute. Add chicken stock and the meat back in along with any juices. Stir until smooth. Turn heat down to low and cover. Cook until pork is very tender, could be an hour or so. Stir to make sure it’s not sticking/burning. Add more stock/water if necessary. You can add some more spices towards the end and check for salt. If it isn’t thick enough, get a cup of water and whisk some flour into it. Make sure the chile verde is at a gentle boil/ simmer and stir the slurry in. Stir, stir, stir. Let is simmer for about 10 minutes to cook the flour. I like to serve it with rice. ETA Yikes, sorry about the highlighting.
  10. I imagine it smells like potpourri.
  11. My wife and I were there just last weekend. Great fun. Meals were mostly to just get something to eat rather than well thought out. We did have some great pizza at Pizza Rock downtown after going to the Mob Museum (also great).
  12. chileheadmike

    Bragging on Mr. Kim

    Congrats. I got mine in KC in 2005, I think. Great class and a lot of fun. I'm still trying to convince my wife that ribs should not "fall off the bone". I got an ugly gray name tag instead of a cool badge like that. It did come with a blue polo shirt though.
  13. Yikes. Hope you're OK.
  14. chileheadmike

    J's Wedding Banquet

    Wow.
  15. It all look delirious to me. Including the clam roll. Very nice photography. Thanks for sharing.
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