Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Andrey Dubovic online classes


Recommended Posts

3 hours ago, Rajala said:

Sorry to jump into this discussion. I see where you guys are coming from, but wouldn't most people see a pill as something that's good for you? That's exactly how I see it. Pills = good. Is it something with two colors that immediately makes you think of some pill full with flunitrazepam or is it just pills over all that triggers something for you?

Actually it looks like ramapril - but making it put my BP up not down!

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
16 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

Again I say "candy cigarettes." Not the best thought out idea. That said, sorry if I drove things off topic. What was interesting with that assignment was the taping in tight quarters. Taping a half sphere is relatively easy, but in this tighter mold it was less so. I will say that electrical tape is more forgiving than painters tape so it wasn't terrible. 

I saw candy cigarettes in the store the other day - now they call them candy sticks! Didn't buy a pack to see if the ends were still red.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Since the pills caused such a fuss - I'm a little hesitant to post my not matcha Matcha Pistachio Truffles. I hesitate to offend the matcha lovers! I have had one matcha I liked in my life - it had rhino in the name - beyond that I remember nothing except that it was carried by Metropolitan Tea.

 

Since I'm thrifty and not really into matcha - I powdered some lovely floral green tea that had been brought for me from Taiwan and used that instead.

 

Didn't give the brilliant color of the matcha version - but tasted a whole lot better.

 

IMG_9543.thumb.jpg.b6aa46923cc1337d61ab0ed9fe6d833d.jpg

 

IMG_9550.thumb.jpg.fb9639445fa13d1945a353209e372f4c.jpg

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post
Share on other sites

I think Kerry had the right idea, to find a substitute for the tea specified. I think Earl Grey ground to a powder might be very good. Matcha is certainly not my "cup of tea." The best description I have seen of it is "vegetal" in taste. It does produce a great color, but the taste is really disappointing to me (I'm trying to protect the feelings of the matcha fans out there). As I was preparing an insert to accompany the homework assignments from the course that I will be giving to family and friends, I came to the matcha truffle. I decided to include a few of them in the assortment but to add the note that recipients should feel free to toss them out if they so desired but that if anyone really liked them, there were lots more at home. All I could think of is what a waste of pistachios (the taste of which is lost in the matcha). All in all, it was a curious choice for one of the final lessons of the course (#18 out of 21) as it was very easy to make whereas the others have been increasingly difficult (wait until someone posts photos of the chocolate-covered gianduja spheres crowned with a peak dipped in gold).

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Some more efforts in the Dubovik course, some more successful than others:

 

Photos #1 and #2: The tomato simulation, mine filled with a citrus ganache (couldn't bring myself to try a tomato ganache). When I was making these, I asked myself what fool would ever do this again, but I am now going to repurpose the tomato as a cherry (colored with a dark red and bright red gradient and topped with a longer leaf and filled with cherry pàte de fruit and pistachio gianduja--a flavor combination requested by the bride and groom for their wedding).

 

dutton-11a.jpg.8dba0aca71fa4a2f89984c17a8658fdb.jpg

 

dutton-11b.jpg.9bcb2aea2574df27170b80227ae41e30.jpg

 

Photo #3: the "shades of grey" design, this filled with pineapple caramel mousse.

 

dutton-12a.jpg.227b9cbdebbbcf9980a8de71d3cc3fdd.jpg

 

Photo #4: the first of the four "eye" designs. These proved a challenge for me, and I still haven't mastered the technique, which is very dependent on consistency and temperature of the cocoa butters, temperature of the room, strength of the air stream, and too many other factors to mention. Even Andrey has varying results, but he makes the process look effortless.

 

dutton-13.jpg.6ec6c0e72fa4dc85c76ff337c6dc133d.jpg

 

Photo #5: The controversial pill design, mine filled with walnut caramel (to make the medicine go down more easily)

 

dutton-15.jpg.43551ddd7a1677af3e956894e0e4f3ed.jpg

 

Photo #6:  My version of the gianduja-filled lollipops, technically mini-lollipops because I didn't have the proper size mold. There was also the issue that most of them came out of the two-piece mold in two pieces, there was no way to judge how thin or thick the shells were until it was too late, and no way to tell exactly how much gianduja was being piped in. All in all, not a stellar result...but the cuteness factor of this design is undeniable.

 

dutton-16.jpg.b12c0672f0a9bb8fd1a0e60ff0e719f9.jpg

 

Photo #7:  The matcha truffles. As I have said elsewhere, this was my first time tasting matcha...and my last.

 

dutton-18.jpg.f738b0de6ccc7a7e6bded3f485aa88a3.jpg

 

Photo #8: And last, my attempt at the gold-dipped gianduja-filled spheres. What a production this was. It didn't help that when I pierced the spheres with a skewer to suspend them upside down (to create the "tail"), the skewers shattered the spheres. This course is definitely a test of one's ingenuity. Picture me standing over a bowl of chocolate holding a sphere in each hand upside down (pierced with a thin metal skewer, which did not shatter the gianduja) waiting for the tail to set. As gfron1 said, not to be repeated.

 

dutton-19.jpg.4af20fd744d699ec000c9d706186f067.jpg

  • Like 11
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, gfron1 said:

MatchaTruffle.thumb.jpg.aea163c3b8c0ad937494d10a5a31d2a7.jpg


I know it's originally the basic tenet of the chocolate truffle but even with that in mind, that particular piece looks amazingly organic. I'm not a big fan of matcha myself but I love the look of what appears to be a little moss covered nugget of something found on the forest floor. I've walked over a lot of ground that looked almost exactly like that while out picking wild blueberries. And I mean organic, forest floor and ground in the blueberry patch in the best possible good-memories way.

  • Like 5

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites

@gfron1 I really like the look of your matcha pistachio truffle. 

 

As for matcha, I have had some that I enjoyed and others that I haven’t. Have had it as tea, pastries, and confections. I’m surprised that there are quite a few here that don’t care for it. At least it doesn’t seem as devisive as the raisin issue. 😉

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just because you can do something - doesn't mean you should do something!

 

They are tasty little buggers - they have a gianduja heart - but they don't fit in packaging. And they did indeed test the limits of my ingenuity to get the little bastards dipped and re dipped!

 

IMG_0042.thumb.jpg.13a485d0bbe257d39ec270302c8799b9.jpg

 

IMG_0052.thumb.jpg.8917617b9ee19e66266e9cf15dd1adf3.jpg

 

Here's my 'production facility'

 

IMG_9989.thumb.jpg.394775f58b7a1558df6d9d6b4e265177.jpg

 

IMG_9990.thumb.jpg.438c4e6b5200445764d2e42efd0b16ae.jpg

 

 

 

 

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 7
Link to post
Share on other sites

LOL In another forum, I opined once that - if the eventual collapse of our world leaves anyone competent to pronounce an elegy - it would probably boil down to "just because you can, doesn't mean you should."

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
32 minutes ago, chromedome said:

LOL In another forum, I opined once that - if the eventual collapse of our world leaves anyone competent to pronounce an elegy - it would probably boil down to "just because you can, doesn't mean you should."

Right up there with "Hold my beer...."

MelissaH

Oswego, NY

Chemist, writer, hired gun

Say this five times fast: "A big blue bucket of blue blueberries."

foodblog1 | kitchen reno | foodblog2

Link to post
Share on other sites
18 minutes ago, MelissaH said:

Right up there with "Hold my beer...."

Have to say that this thread has taken a really fun turn! Thanks for the realistic take on some of these things. 

 

And I have to agree on the Matcha tea thing. I don't hate it, but it seems to only bring novelty, not enjoyment. Other teas taste so much better. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

Now my last four efforts at Andrey's designs.

 

Photo #1:  The "eye" design in turquoise and white. Most of them aren't what he has in mind, but after experimenting on literally several hundred cavities and trying every permutation I could think of in room temp, strength of air stream, consistency of cocoa butters (how much coloring I added and how overtempered they were--that was the goal in this case, not a defect), I decided I had done enough, at least for now. These are filled with peanut butter mousse.

 

dutton-14.jpg.493ef6e0777a41421871e0c21f9eded1.jpg

 

Photo #2 and #3:  The yellow and black version. I think these are a bit closer to what Andrey does. They are filled with lime ganache.

 

dutton-17a.jpg.96ec6afd2872519d69ac97bb4d941354.jpg

 

dutton-17b.jpg.0e556d7d8b5072877f5dcf22279c1a4f.jpg

 

Photo #4:  And the multicolored ones, made by spraying yellow, red, and green cocoa butter.  Mine are OK, but again, not a replica of what Andrey created. I filled them with a yuzu and ginger ganache. As I have said before, after trying the fillings he offers, in order to avoid duplication, I used what I had in my freezer. A further reflection on the "eye" design, which is a key component of the course:  I think another person taking the class offered the best conclusion: one would have to be with Andrey in his studio to see exactly what consistency he has in mind for the cocoa butter; it's not possible to tell fully from the videos. And at least I had difficulty replicating the process for all the eye designs. In the videos it works for him every time without apparent effort.

 

dutton-20.jpg.e56a2c124423e002758a666f4cb55b75.jpg

 

Photo #5:  This is the final lesson and offered for me an opportunity to think about variations on what Andrey does. The red pieces used in two of the decorations are "raspberry crunches" (made by Sosa, and "waterproof" so they remain crunchy--a delicious item that could have lots of uses). The red seals turned out OK and are a clever addition, but the stamps I found didn't stay cold long enough to create more than one seal at a time--making this an impossible decoration for me to use in any quantity. The decoration showing one raspberry crunch and a gold-dust stripe is my own attempt (I like the use of gold dust very much, but it really works only when it goes in a place the eater is unlikely to touch, such as the top of a dipped piece). The filling for these is a raspberry ganache (a recipe from Andrey) and is delicious.

 

dutton-21.jpg.4cc6fd42cd0f6f32d6ef87c0e47b3706.jpg

Edited by Jim D. (log)
  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

Photo #5:  This is the final lesson and offered for me an opportunity to think about variations on what Andrey does. The red pieces used in two of the decorations are "raspberry crunches" (made by Sosa, and "waterproof" so they remain crunchy--a delicious item that could have lots of uses). The red seals turned out OK and are a clever addition, but the stamps I found didn't stay cold long enough to create more than one seal at a time--making this an impossible decoration for me to use in any quantity. The decoration showing one raspberry crunch and a gold-dust stripe is my own attempt (I like the use of gold dust very much, but it really works only when it goes in a place the eater is unlikely to touch, such as the top of a dipped piece). The filling for these is a raspberry ganache (a recipe from Andrey) and is delicious.

 

dutton-21.jpg.4cc6fd42cd0f6f32d6ef87c0e47b3706.jpg

 

Gotta admit, these more restrained ones still look amazing - proof you don't always need 4 colors on everything. 

 

As for keeping the stamp cold, maybe a bit of dry ice would help, as long as it doesn't get too cold.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, pastrygirl said:

 

Gotta admit, these more restrained ones still look amazing - proof you don't always need 4 colors on everything. 

 

As for keeping the stamp cold, maybe a bit of dry ice would help, as long as it doesn't get too cold.

Yes, after all the colors of the past couple of months, something simpler comes across as elegant. That's why when I use my triangle mold that is so popular (for reasons that mostly escape me), I often leave it completely plain. For the eGullet chocolate workshop last year, I brushed the sides of it with gold dust in vodka--never realizing that the gold comes off on the eater's hand.

 

Good idea about the dry ice. Kerry used some sort of medical spray that quick-freezes things.

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Yes, after all the colors of the past couple of months, something simpler comes across as elegant. That's why when I use my triangle mold that is so popular (for reasons that mostly escape me), I often leave it completely plain. For the eGullet chocolate workshop last year, I brushed the sides of it with gold dust in vodka--never realizing that the gold comes off on the eater's hand.

 

Good idea about the dry ice. Kerry used some sort of medical spray that quick-freezes things.

Not medical actually - it was canned Freeze Spray that Chef Rubber used to sell. I was wrong - they still have it here.

 

Edited by Kerry Beal (log)
  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/19/2018 at 9:08 PM, curls said:

@gfron1 I really like the look of your matcha pistachio truffle. 

 

As for matcha, I have had some that I enjoyed and others that I haven’t. Have had it as tea, pastries, and confections. I’m surprised that there are quite a few here that don’t care for it. At least it doesn’t seem as devisive as the raisin issue. 😉

I think it is more an issue of a bad formula. His recipe is 100g white choco to 10g matcha. First, apparently there is culinary matcha and also drinking, and he didn't specify (I used culinary), and second if he's like most chefs he just added some and when it came time to write the recipe he guessed. It just needed to be cut down to 3-5g and I think it would have tasted okay.

  • Like 4
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, gfron1 said:

I think it is more an issue of a bad formula. His recipe is 100g white choco to 10g matcha. First, apparently there is culinary matcha and also drinking, and he didn't specify (I used culinary), and second if he's like most chefs he just added some and when it came time to write the recipe he guessed. It just needed to be cut down to 3-5g and I think it would have tasted okay.

Interesting, I did not know about culinary matcha. I've always used drinking matcha for tea and pastries. What is the difference between the two?

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, curls said:

Interesting, I did not know about culinary matcha. I've always used drinking matcha for tea and pastries. What is the difference between the two?

I have no idea. My guess is the grind fineness, but really...don't know.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I have no idea. My guess is the grind fineness, but really...don't know.

 

I was inspired to look it up, and here is an explanation. I checked my order, and I got the "classic culinary" grade, as opposed to the "premium culinary" grade. So I paid $9.95 as opposed to $29.95 for the good stuff. I should have known "classic" is now a derogatory term.

  • Like 2
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wown! Very, very impressive. Nicely done, Kerry.

  • Like 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm having another go at the first lesson - I'm up north so I'm struggling with the colors - I have some red, blue, yellow and white powder and few small bottles of Glarus Gourmet Chocobutters. For the yellow splatter initially I didn't have an opaque yellow - so I added some gold interference powder to a transparent yellow Chocobutter. Later today depending on how civilized the ER is I hope to be able to get these molded.

 

I also don't have a room cool enough so I placed the mold in the fridge before each color addition to bring it to the prescribed temperature. I'm curious to see what sort of shine I get.

 

 

 

t.IMG_1363.JPG.8a47b7ce9fb067aa0ad0cdac185bae56.JPG

 

 

 

 

 

  • Like 5
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Similar Content

    • By rookie
      I am making molded bunnies for Easter and I am finding that the
      necks are cracking and the head breaks away from the body. I have noticed that the neck is not as thick as the rest of the bunny. Total grams for this bunny is 200.
      Does anyone have any suggestions on how to rectify this? Oh yeah I didn't mention that after pouring into molds I place in the refridgerator.
      Any suggestions are welcome!
      Cheers
      Mary - Rookie
    • By GRiker
      Looks like you’re in the Washington Post this morning, Congratulations! 🎊 
       
      https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.washingtonpost.com/food/2021/01/31/chocolates-valentines-day/%3foutputType=amp
    • By no10
      Hello eGForums,
       
      I'm curious if anyone has purchased these ganache and caramel ruler bars (https://www.tcfsales.com/products/658-ganache-and-caramel-ruler-bars-set-of-2-ea/) from TCF before or has experience with this company? Are they a reputable company?
       
      It costs $87.96 (not including shipping) to purchase 4 stainless steel square bars, measuring 1/2" x 1/2" x 15" L, which seems like a reasonable price relative to other companies. Correct me if I'm wrong. Does anyone suggest other companies to purchase bars from?
       
      On a related topic, I know that a possibly more affordable alternative would be to visit a local metal fabricator and purchase metal bars from them. My concern is purchasing bars that are made from an alloy and finish that is 'food-safe'. Does anyone know what grade/alloy and finish of stainless steel is 'food-safe'? Does anyone know what grade/alloy and finish of aluminum is 'food-safe'?
       
       
    • By no10
      Several of Greweling's recipes call for the use of a round piping tip. I'm not familiar with what sizing system he's using. When he says to use a "no. [integer] round tip", what does the [integer] correspond to in millimeters or inches? For example, what is the diameter of a no. 3 round tip used by Greweling?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...