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gfron1

Andrey Dubovic online classes

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1 hour ago, Jim D. said:

All of the Savour materials are available all the time, so you could easily view the videos at once and print out all the recipes (it isn't a "course" in the sense of Andrey). In my opinion, however, I think it is primarily in the decoration of bonbons that Kirsten Tibballs (of Savour) has the most to offer. I enjoy her videos a lot and she is a wonderful teacher (her recent video on the "feathering" technique, which is referred to on this forum as "dendrites," is presented in such a clear way that I was able to follow it the first time I tried).

 

But if it is chiefly recipes that you need at this point (as opposed to decoration of bonbons), then I would go an entirely different direction and purchase some books from Peter Greweling, Ewald Notter, and Jean-Pierre Wybauw. You don't really need videos to make a ganache. Once you see what the authors I listed have to say and develop your own offerings, then you could take a more advanced look at decorating techniques with Andrey Dubovik (I didn't find most of his recipes for fillings useful).

Great feedback Jim,  I´ve already bought Ewald Notter´s book when I started a month ago because I found the recipes so useful. I see I wasn't mistaken with my choice... Thanks again!

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1 hour ago, gfron1 said:

Looking at your work I don't think Andrey's class is where I would focus my time and money. I'm seeing so many online courses pop-up, and ultimately they're all trying to capitalize on the Instagram era of chocolate making where the newest design is what everyone wants to emulate. But, as Jim said, you already have emulated some of his designs which suggests that you have a good artistic eye for figuring out how techniques are performed. Find a workshop that solidifies your fundamentals and skills...not a design.

Thanks gfron1! Do yo have any recommendation for online workshops that teaches fundamentals? As I live in Argentina I don´have access to Savour, Melissa Coppel or another similar workshops...

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9 hours ago, Barb19 said:

Great feedback Jim,  I´ve already bought Ewald Notter´s book when I started a month ago because I found the recipes so useful. I see I wasn't mistaken with my choice... Thanks again!

As was stated recently in another thread, Greweling's Chocolates & Confections is highly recommended. He doesn't have as many recipes for bonbon fillings as Notter or Wybauw (though I use Greweling recipes in nearly every batch I make), and it is true that Notter has a great deal of information on theory and technique, most people consider Greweling the expert on those subjects.  If you want to know why something went wrong, he is the source. The same applies when you want to start developing your own fillings.

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9 hours ago, Barb19 said:

Thanks gfron1! Do yo have any recommendation for online workshops that teaches fundamentals? As I live in Argentina I don´have access to Savour, Melissa Coppel or another similar workshops...

Savour has online videos, and again, I believe you have demonstrated a level of skill that would suggest you could grow from unsupervised classes. Ecole is the other that I know many people have participated. They too have on-site, but also video.

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11 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

Savour has online videos, and again, I believe you have demonstrated a level of skill that would suggest you could grow from unsupervised classes. Ecole is the other that I know many people have participated. They too have on-site, but also video.

Ecole would be great for the tempering, business etc side of it - but most of the decorating comes when the students attend the master's classes in various locations around the world. Not to discourage anyone taking Ecole (after all I am the shelf life tutor)!

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Thanks for everything guys! You are all amazingly generous sharing your knowledge and giving advise!! I’ll check out all the options you gave me, as I’m starting I have a lot to learn and sometimes it is overwhelming. Have a great day! 

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I'm a fan of Savour. You can join for a month and see if there is enough content for you. Of all the online courses/workshops  I've followed, I have gotten the most from Savour. Some of her projects are a little involved, but she can not be faulted for being thorough and easy to understand. Plus, you get the added benefit of guest chocolatiers like Melissa Coppel.


Edited by julie99nl quote error (log)
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On 2/7/2019 at 3:23 PM, Barb19 said:

Thanks gfron1! Do yo have any recommendation for online workshops that teaches fundamentals? As I live in Argentina I don´have access to Savour, Melissa Coppel or another similar workshops...

I'd recommend contacting savour directly via the email on their website and asking if they know of anyone else that has any issues in argentina - they may be able to help you subscribe successfully.

 

Disclaimer: I've been part of their online classes since day 1 :)

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14 hours ago, keychris said:

I'd recommend contacting savour directly via the email on their website and asking if they know of anyone else that has any issues in argentina - they may be able to help you subscribe successfully.

 

Disclaimer: I've been part of their online classes since day 1 :)

Oh! No!! What I meant is that I don’t have access to the hands on workshops not the online classes 😂 i’ll take julie99nl and subscribe for one month and see all the content to check out if the annual subscription is worth it for me

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For those who are interested in Andrey Dubovik's famous "eye" technique of decorating, he himself has now posted a video on Instagram. The video is brief but shows it clearly...except perhaps for the hours and hours of practice it takes to perfect it (speaking from experience).

 

 

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On 6/24/2018 at 10:12 AM, gfron1 said:

The funny thing about this to me is that with my old Badger I never could have pulled it off - not enough pressure. But now that I have the big ol' California Air Tool that YOU suggested I buy, I'm blowing through the gun with no issues whatsoever. I did also switch to a gravity feed gun at Andrey's recommendation and that i am sure is helping. 

Old post, but I was wondering if you could share what model did you get. I am still with my little Badger, which has been getting super hot lately and yesterday while I was using it, was spaying moisture (I wasn't using the bottle with colored CB, but just the air from the top portion of the bottom fed mini gun), so I am not sure whats the deal with that. Michigan is humid and my new kitchen doesn't have an ac vent and it gets warm and super humid. Also I have noticed your gradient are pretty smooth, of course due to user skill, but I wondering what do you use for airbrush. Again, I am super behind on all matter of chocolate and colors right now. Trying to catch up :-P

Thank you!


Vanessa

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On 9/3/2019 at 4:30 PM, Desiderio said:

Old post, but I was wondering if you could share what model did you get. I am still with my little Badger, which has been getting super hot lately and yesterday while I was using it, was spaying moisture (I wasn't using the bottle with colored CB, but just the air from the top portion of the bottom fed mini gun), so I am not sure whats the deal with that. Michigan is humid and my new kitchen doesn't have an ac vent and it gets warm and super humid. Also I have noticed your gradient are pretty smooth, of course due to user skill, but I wondering what do you use for airbrush. Again, I am super behind on all matter of chocolate and colors right now. Trying to catch up 😛

Thank you!

Bought on Amazon: California Air Tools CAT-4620AC Ultra Quiet & Oil-Free 2.0 hp 4.0 gallon Aluminum Twin Tank Electric Portable Air Compressor, Silver

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Thank you so much :-) I am so looking forward to the next workshop!


Edited by Desiderio (log)
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Vanessa

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Does anyone have plans to pick up his book Pralinarium? I love the pictures, not sure how it is on content, but I'm sure there alot in there. Recently they just did another printing of the book, so I was looking into it, shipping to US is 40 euro. I'm kicking myself a little bit right now, his page shows that you can do a free local pick of the book from Warsaw, Poland. I was just there a few weeks ago! Totally missed out!

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The book is pretty low quality. It's possibly worth it if you're looking for techniques and step by step for coloring. Other than that, there are much better books. I regret my purchase a bit, I didn't expect pictures in it to be so low quality.

 

Regarding Savour, I've been a member for two years on a monthly basis. 🤦‍♂️

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On 9/11/2019 at 1:28 AM, Rajala said:

It's possibly worth it if you're looking for techniques and step by step for coloring.


That would be the only reason I would even consider wanting it. Coffee table books are of no interest to me, tell me how you did it. :D


It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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19 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

That would be the only reason I would even consider wanting it. Coffee table books are of no interest to me, tell me how you did it.

 

It's just a warning for anyone expecting it to be a great book. He's no Greweling. :)

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