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Andrey Dubovic online classes


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Andrey refers to them as horizontal feed and gravity feed (side and top). I've used the horizontal feed for a decade now and it works just fine, but as we're discussing, the colder room definitely would exasperate the problem that already existed with horizontal feeds of the additional millimeters that the cocoa butter has to travel through, and be pulled through, versus the shorter distance of dripping into.

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During the really long winters here, keeping my work area at 20 C would require additional heating beyond what I normally do, not cooling. There's usually only maybe 3 months out of the year that I have to sometimes resort to cooling the room. So I've become used to having my heat gun plugged in and warmed up whenever I'm working. But the gravity feed brushes were right there in my face when I bought the others, don't know why it didn't occur me to ask around about which would be better.

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Tangerine/tomato - with strategically placed oak leaf. 

 

IMG_9845.jpg.b88d40ae34923b303b17674265334a94.jpg

 

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Filling is marshmallow fluff/fondant buttercream and hazelnut gianduja. 

 

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50 shades of grey 

 

 

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My turn at the striped quenelle mold and the graphite look.

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All I see in the purple ones are the flaws. Ughh. I think I've been pushing/cleaning my mold surface either too hard or on too soft of a towel. The swoosh stripes were made with electrical tape.

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We're using what he calls PVC tape, but what we call electrical tape. For my graphite I accidentally ordered this high temp tape off amazon that worked great. Hard to handle, but once in the mold it was flawless meaning no seep and no residue. Here's what it looks like:

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and after splatter:

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And Then I had covered some of that tape with electrical tape to do a double strip seeing if I could remove one tape and not damage the second. It worked perfectly although I wasn't very careful in how I placed my tape:

DoubleStripe.thumb.jpg.3c0bebed3f509a3e08bfa0c9e17544d3.jpg

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I will join the display for the "tape lessons."

 

Photos #1 and 2:  the speckled black, white, and gray design (three of Dubovik's favorite colors). Although the stripe appears to be overlaid on the bonbon, this is a sort of optical illusion--the tape keeps the mold clean while the splattering is being done. I can see this being adapted to other colors easily.

 

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Photo #3: While I was working on stripes (a subject the pages of eGullet can demonstrate has fascinated--and frustrated--me for years), I tried another design, one that is less forgiving of any errors. The trick when there are no spots to distract one is to get the stripe completely clean (needless to say, I didn't reach that goal).

 

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Photo #4: The triangle design. This is probably not a decoration you would want to adopt for your Christmas rush orders.

 

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3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Tangerine/tomato - with strategically placed oak leaf. 

 

The great artists from the Renaissance used strategically placed oak leafs tomgreat advantage.

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6 hours ago, Rajala said:

Looking good!

 

I remember seeing some picture from him, where it looks like a weed leaf. :D 

 

 

His version uses a maple leaf I believe.

 

 

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Try as I might I just could not get a really good picture of these ones. Anna and I have since figured that I needed to have HDR turned off on my iPhone camera.

 IMG_9906.jpg.51a2122da01e8d03c97c2f8790b990c3.jpg

 

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You wouldn't know it looking at these pictures but you could lose yourself in these ones.

 

This was my second try making these - the first were pathetic - I was much happier with this batch.

 

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I took some video moving them around - it's rather funny watching it fall off my hand, me swearing and picking it up again.

 

 

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4 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

IMG_0139.jpg.249ce1a84ba77c246d96ee89132792a9.jpgIMG_0072.jpg.8c8cf448bb8f7b6274ba046df33bf769.jpg

 

  You wouldn't know it looking at these pictures but you could lose yourself in these ones.

 

I think the photos show the depth beautifully. The transparent gloss is (relatively speaking) so far above where the colors begin that it's astonishing even in pictures.

 

If you have a free-idea project during this course - make your own confection, that sort of thing - a couple of ideas would be to mimic the cat's-eye marble (remember those?) or a crystal ball, with the swirling image taking shape in the depths. You have the touch!

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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On 7/4/2018 at 7:39 PM, Tri2Cook said:

This is my favorite effect so far. 

This is the effect that made me sign up for the class, and as he says repeatedly in his videos, this is his original technique. I saw a post by Melissa Coppel yesterday for a vanilla bonbon that I believe is following a very similar technique. Watch for it to explode very, very quickly across the globe in various formats.

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5 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

This is the effect that made me sign up for the class, and as he says repeatedly in his videos, this is his original technique. I saw a post by Melissa Coppel yesterday for a vanilla bonbon that I believe is following a very similar technique. Watch for it to explode very, very quickly across the globe in various formats.

I noticed Vincent Vallee using a similar technique at the French Pastry School course he taught a couple of weeks ago.

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On 6/7/2018 at 7:04 AM, Kerry Beal said:

As previously mentioned I'm plugging away at my own speed because I'm heading north at the end of the month. 

 

These two are 'fireworks' - not crazy about the red and yellow ones (doesn't help that I ended up with orange by not cleaning the red applicator before changing to yellow). 

 

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The filling was browned butter bourbon with a gianduja/feuillitine layer. 

 

His response "even though you made them in other way from me, I really like the result"

 

 

 

IMG_9784.jpg



Kerry, the black ones are absolutely stunning! It looks like the most delicate, perfect feather!

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On 7/6/2018 at 4:33 PM, Jim D. said:

Yes, the cost is 1400--but that is in Belarusian rubles. It converts (at the moment) to about $725 US.

 

Hmm. Maybe in the fall, if he continues to offer it. My work space will be cooler, and my partner at work won’t have vacation, so I won’t be getting slaughtered at work. It’s what I hate about summer...

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