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gfron1

Andrey Dubovic online classes

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Has anyone taken one of Andrey's classes. I know they've been mentioned in the How Do They Do That thread, but I can't remember if anyone has taken a course. I'm curious because he continues to do methods that are groundbreaking. Not cheap for an online course, but I'm interested in taking his praline course.

 

I just watched his free tempering class and it was good, nothing special but good enough to allay my fears that the Russian to English translation or camerawork might make the class not worthwhile.

 

Thnx.

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You are right that the price is "not cheap."  I read through most of the material and am a little confused about how it works. So the student watches a teaching session from Dubovik each week, then practices, then send photos of what he/she has accomplished? But I gather that this is not a "proceed-at-your-own-pace" class since it seems that the week's project has to be submitted that week. I'm not sure how a person working at chocolate production could do this except in a substantial period of down time. And did you understand him to say that there is a start date when everyone has to start--in other words, there is no selecting one's own start date? I'm thinking that in July or August, for example, I would have lots of time to work on the lessons, but not right now. I wonder if there will be future classes. Sorry if I misunderstood what he is saying. Thanks for pointing this out. His work is amazing.

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I saw that too, but I also saw

"Start anytime, available forever, with authors support"

 

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1 hour ago, gfron1 said:

I saw that too, but I also saw

"Start anytime, available forever, with authors support"

 

I wish I could determine which is true--whether it's anytime...or now. I did find that Bentley previously mentioned the course about a year ago in the "How do they do that?" thread.

 

I was also confused by Dubovik's listing of the molds that will be used. I have a couple of them but by no means all. Since purchasing all of them would add a substantial amount to the cost, I assume he doesn't mean you have to use the specific ones. Unlike those who have tons of storage, I have reached the point where buying more molds means I have to move out of my house.

 

The cost of the course isn't quite so daunting when you figure out that he is speaking of Belarus rubles, so 1440 of them is equivalent to only 712 US dollars.

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12 hours ago, Jim D. said:

I wish I could determine which is true--whether it's anytime...or now. I did find that Bentley previously mentioned the course about a year ago in the "How do they do that?" thread.

 

I was also confused by Dubovik's listing of the molds that will be used. I have a couple of them but by no means all. Since purchasing all of them would add a substantial amount to the cost, I assume he doesn't mean you have to use the specific ones. Unlike those who have tons of storage, I have reached the point where buying more molds means I have to move out of my house.

 

The cost of the course isn't quite so daunting when you figure out that he is speaking of Belarus rubles, so 1440 of them is equivalent to only 712 US dollars.

Right, about the exchange rate. I may take one for the team because I really do find his work so unique from any chef I'm seeing in the US. We'll see how good of a sales month I have :)

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way too pricey for me :(

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I posed my questions on the website of the course and got answers within minutes (apparently from Dubovik himself):

 

All the molds listed are not required, but he has to be informed of missing ones. Half-spheres are the most important, but the silicone mold listed is necessary for that particular lesson.

 

I asked about using already mixed colored cocoa butter instead of the dry colors he specifies. The answer was no. The dry colors are required "because we will need to create specific colours (satured, oversaturated, translucent)." Anyone know of a good U.S. source for those?

 

The most surprising answer was about whether there is a specific start date or a student can begin at any time. Contrary to what the website appears to state, there is a specific date. The next one is May 28 (might be helpful to list those dates somewhere on the site).

 

An answer to another person's question might be of interest:  If a student does not have all the equipment, it is possible to follow the theory provided in the course without doing (or submitting) the homework. Otherwise assignments must be submitted on a weekly basis. As I haven't had to submit homework for evaluation for some years, this option is appealing to me. I'm not sure I'm up to having Andrey Dubovik grade my work!

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To update what I posted earlier:  I asked about future dates, and Dubovik replied that they are not set--the schedule depends on the "number of online students" (not sure I understand that since people wouldn't likely register before knowing the dates) and on his schedule. So for the moment it's May 28.

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Posted (edited)

Also, from the FAQs section. It appears the materials are not available forever after taking the course. It’s just a month. It’s too rich for my taste, but even if it wasn’t, this would be a deal breaker for me.

 

”After the course has finished you will continue to have access to all study materials for one month.”

 

 

 

 


Edited by tikidoc (log)

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It's not really any different to other online subscription models, I guess. 

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Wow, that price is crazy. I'd rather spend that money on an on-hands class with Coppel or something (which I did, but that's a year away :()

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5 hours ago, keychris said:

It's not really any different to other online subscription models, I guess. 

I'm thinking you take copious notes to refer to in the future - no different than any class where things get demonstrated. 

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3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I'm thinking you take copious notes to refer to in the future - no different than any class where things get demonstrated. 


Or lots of screenshots and the judicious application of video capture software... not that I would condone such behavior, of course. :D

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10 hours ago, tikidoc said:

Also, from the FAQs section. It appears the materials are not available forever after taking the course. It’s just a month. It’s too rich for my taste, but even if it wasn’t, this would be a deal breaker for me.

 

”After the course has finished you will continue to have access to all study materials for one month.”

 

 

Just for the record:

 

Quote

"you will get a printable version of course instructions in the end (but not the video). You won’t need video after graduation because you will be ready to create every element of course by your own."

 

I love the optimism in the second sentence!

 

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6 hours ago, Rajala said:

Wow, that price is crazy. I'd rather spend that money on an on-hands class with Coppel or something (which I did, but that's a year away :()

I don't think the price is too out of line factoring in the exchange rate. Artistic value is determined by what people are willing to pay, and again, I think Andrey is doing techniques that I'm not seeing anywhere else. Caveat - I am seeing some of the techniques among other Russian chefs, but they aren't teaching. Another option is simply wait a year and the techniques will be widely demonstrated by the people who are going to learn it.

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20 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I don't think the price is too out of line factoring in the exchange rate.

 

Not sure what you mean by this? I don't understand what the currency rates has to do with it? Maybe I'm just misunderstanding what you're trying to express.

 

I mean, if you think it's worth it, it is, for you. I personally wouldn't pay that much for just videos. But I see what you mean with the artistic value etc :) 

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11 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

I don't think the price is too out of line factoring in the exchange rate. Artistic value is determined by what people are willing to pay, and again, I think Andrey is doing techniques that I'm not seeing anywhere else. 

 

I agree. For myself, while I find classes taught in completely equipped kitchens (ateliers?) of chocolatiers dazzling experiences (that description is no exaggeration in the case of Melissa Coppel), I have trouble translating what I learn there to my own space. Unlike Melissa, I don't have 3 Selmi tanks filled with perfectly tempered chocolate ready at all times or shelves with practically every ingredient one could possibly want stocked and meticulously labeled. I have to learn to work with what I have. And I wonder whether an online course might be better for someone like me. I will find out as I definitely intend to enroll in the Savour online courses, which are quite modestly priced and remain available forever. As for comparing Dubovik's pricing with Coppel's, yes, it is a definite plus to have direct contact with the instructor (as long as the class is not too large) and this is something I would love to do, but her prices are quite substantial and then there is the cost of airfare and a hotel room in Las Vegas to consider.

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Valid points! Savour is nice, Kirsten does a really good job explaining things in her videos.

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Posted (edited)
39 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

I will find out as I definitely intend to enroll in the Savour online courses, which are quite modestly priced and remain available forever

 

Just to clarify, only as long as you stay enrolled ;)

 

25 minutes ago, Rajala said:

Valid points! Savour is nice, Kirsten does a really good job explaining things in her videos.

Can be a little be delayed in answering questions on their forum though!


Edited by keychris (log)

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Hehe, well you can get an answer from a professional if you ask the questions in a good way, because some times I can get an answer which is like "eh, hmm i did ask about that, and you just expanded on the question without answering it?" :D I guess she's a quite busy person.

 

Regarding Savour, do remember that the classes are very wide in their theme, and not that narrow.

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So, I am definitely signing up for this. Can someone translate his requirements for a compressor into Badger language? "Air compressor, oil free, with a 3 L (or more) receiver tank."

 

I know my current Badger won't cut the cake for the designs he's doing.

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21 minutes ago, gfron1 said:

So, I am definitely signing up for this. Can someone translate his requirements for a compressor into Badger language? "Air compressor, oil free, with a 3 L (or more) receiver tank."

 

I know my current Badger won't cut the cake for the designs he's doing.

 

Here is a link to the compressor I have:  California Air Tools. I have a Grex airbrush (I wrote a review of it elsewhere on eGullet), but I don't know any reason your Badger would not work with a compressor like this one because, regardless of what PSI the Badger specifies, the compressor can be adjusted to that level. I have never had any problems with this compressor providing enough air. It is, as these things go, quieter than most. You may wish to find something equivalent locally (and perhaps at a better price).

 

By the way, I wasn't sure I was going to confess this after the comments on Andrey's pricing, but I have already signed up. I have asked lots of questions that were not covered in the material online about requirements for the classes. You should be able to find those questions and the answers on the website in case you have any. There are quite a few supplies that he said are not essential, but I decided to find as many as I could in the time remaining before the course starts. Luster dust was not mentioned online, but in the introductory video (which I have watched) he mentions that, so I wrote him. I don't know whether he himself is actually answering, but the responses have been very quick.

 

One thing to watch out for:  My payment process was a bit complicated. Using a credit card for a charge in Belarus to an entity called "Lililove.me" alerted the security troops at Visa (and I'm glad it did, but it did take a while to get the payment approved).

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Haha, that domain name is a bit dodgy. :D

 

Regarding signing up, to each and his own, right? I hope you enjoy it! Maybe it's amazing.

 

I watched some free video of something and it had a voice over in English which was really bad. Maybe these videos are better?

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For anyone lurking, what I've learned from friends about his technique to get a great shine with the cocoa butter;

 

He heats the cocoa butter to 50 degrees, cool it down with movements to 26-27 degrees and then heat ut up to 30 degrees with a heat gun. Then spray your molds.

 

Maybe you guys watching the videos can confirm for people interested. Not sure if my friend remember it correctly. :) I've always been taught that you don't need to temper in that way if you're using an airbrush, but maybe it's what you should do to get that crazy shine, combined with the right room temperature etc.

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37 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

 

Here is a link to the compressor I have:  California Air Tools. I have a Grex airbrush (I wrote a review of it elsewhere on eGullet), but I don't know any reason your Badger would not work with a compressor like this one because, regardless of what PSI the Badger specifies, the compressor can be adjusted to that level. I have never had any problems with this compressor providing enough air. It is, as these things go, quieter than most. You may wish to find something equivalent locally (and perhaps at a better price).

 

By the way, I wasn't sure I was going to confess this after the comments on Andrey's pricing, but I have already signed up. I have asked lots of questions that were not covered in the material online about requirements for the classes. You should be able to find those questions and the answers on the website in case you have any. There are quite a few supplies that he said are not essential, but I decided to find as many as I could in the time remaining before the course starts. Luster dust was not mentioned online, but in the introductory video (which I have watched) he mentions that, so I wrote him. I don't know whether he himself is actually answering, but the responses have been very quick.

 

One thing to watch out for:  My payment process was a bit complicated. Using a credit card for a charge in Belarus to an entity called "Lililove.me" alerted the security troops at Visa (and I'm glad it did, but it did take a while to get the payment approved).

Thanks Jim. I thought those might have been your questions. And to Rajala - the shine isn't my goal, the decorating techniques are, and I believe many require a more powerful compressor than what I have.

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