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maggiethecat

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 5)

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In cased you missed this here is a link to Amanda Hesser's recent stoop sale of her cookbook purging - a clever idea that could be advertised via Craig's List or the like.  Donate $5 for a food related charity and bring a family recipe 

 

http://food52.com/blog/14454-amanda-hesser-s-cookbook-stoop-sale-had-family-recipes-cookies-and-you


Edited by heidih (log)

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I had missed that note. What a great idea for the book sale! Thanks, Heidi.

liamsaunt, I spy a copy of The Black Dog Summer at the Vineyard Cookbook on your shelf. Nice to see that someone else owns that book too! I've only made a few things from it, over all these years, but I enjoy browsing through it and daydreaming about Martha's Vineyard anyway.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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Welcome back, liamsaunt!

 

I love pictures of other people's shelves. Thanks for including those. It's great to see that lovingly (I assume) shopworn copy of Joy of Cooking. And that someone other than I has every hardbound annual edition of CI.

 

Could you post more pictures after your project is done? A library ladder in one's house: It doesn't get much better than that!

 

Funny you noticed that.  My Joy of Cooking was my bible when I first got married and wanted to learn how to cook things other than the five recipes I made over and over again in college.  It got a lot of use, as you can see.  I don't cook from it too often anymore, but I still make their cornbread.

 

I will post pictures once the bookshelf project is done, but it might be a while!  I have been moving very slowly on making this house my own and have a long way to go.

 

I had missed that note. What a great idea for the book sale! Thanks, Heidi.

liamsaunt, I spy a copy of The Black Dog Summer at the Vineyard Cookbook on your shelf. Nice to see that someone else owns that book too! I've only made a few things from it, over all these years, but I enjoy browsing through it and daydreaming about Martha's Vineyard anyway.

 

There are actually a bunch of really good recipes in that book. The pan seared striped bass with garlic mustard sauce is delicious.  I also like the chili scallops with greens, the blackened shrimp with red pepper coulis, and my husband likes the codfish with lobster sauce.

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I'm not sure how many cookbooks I have, guess about 140.

They do have their own dedicated bookshelf in the kitchen, mostly Asian and other on the left, mostly European or western on the right.

image.jpeg

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I have a few bookshelves for my magazines and books

 

Magazines: Fine Cooking; Bon Appetite, Food and Wine;

DSC01186.jpg

 

This is the entire bookshelf we had built in a few years ago:

DSC01192.jpg

 

And these are the three sections:DSC01191.jpg

DSC01190.jpg

DSC01189.jpg

 

A couple more built ins:

DSC01188.jpg

DSC01187.jpg

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Every time we have a yard sale, I have a few less cookbooks. The 3 drawers below the desk are also full of cookbooks, but this is what is left.  There used to be a couple more book shelves full as well as this one.  There are two books in there that aren't cookbooks. One is a bible and the other is a first edition (in dust jacket) of Atlas Shrugged.  After I read that book, I was convinced Ayn Rand was a total kook.  

DSCN3075_zpsdytoljch.jpg


Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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sigh...I had, until the first of the year, a bookshelf in the kitchen...30" wide, about 72" high, and full of cookbooks.  A move forced a major thinning of the collection, but some of my treasures that I saved are "Favorite Island Cookery"(1973) and "Favorite Island Cookery, Book II"(1975), by the Honpa Hongwanji Buddhist Temple in Honolulu, and "Nisei Kitchen" by the St. Louis Japanese American Citizens League (1975).  Also my mother's copy (rarely used!!) of the 1943 edition of "The Joy of Cooking". 

 

I gave away a lot of books that I'd only read, but not cooked from.  It made me a little sad, but I kept my favorites, and am down to nearly one and a half shelves.

 

I kept my 3 Diana Kennedy books, and all my copies from the brief run of the magazine "Kitchen Garden".

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I was pleased to find Julia Della Croce's Umbria at a recent sale, and right next to it, Nancy Harmon Jenkins' Mediterranean Diet.  Both really excellent!

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So much for promises made to myself not to purchase any more cookbooks.  But then I'll bet that many of us have made the same vow...and subsequently broken it.

Borrowed Mark Bittman's Kitchen Express from the library and was so pleased with it, that I bought it.  So now I have my own copy. 

 

But no more...do you hear me?...no more buying cookbooks. :raz:

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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Getting ready to add another book to my collection.  CHef Irv Miller's "Panhandle to Pan" written from his experience cooking around the Florida Panhandle.  http://jacksonsrestaurant.com/


It is good to be a BBQ Judge.

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