Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

What to do with caviar


KennethT
 Share

Recommended Posts

Recently we received this extremely generous gift:

20210611_191409_HDR.thumb.jpg.5797e2b10577afebd21db2460809d13a.jpg

 

The onion jam will go with some pate of some kind, that's a given.  But I haven't had access to this much caviar, ever.  Any ideas of good ways to use it?

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, there's always calling some local friends to come over? Or I call you to come over for dinner with C, and you happen to mention that you have some caviar you'd like to bring along...

 

😜

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
  • Haha 3

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well,  I know what I'd do.

 

I'd just lock the world out then open the can and the champagne and deposit the contents of both into my cakehole. There really is no better way.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 2
  • Haha 2

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What's in the package on the left? Little toasts?

 

Would you consider eating your caviar with vodka instead? (Saving your Champagne for another time?)

 

What about mascarpone cheese (I've never tried this combo, but sounds good). For the base, something made of potato.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

I'd swap my share of caviar for your share of champagne.    Such a cheap date.

hmmmm.... while I don't drink very often, Krug is maybe my favorite champagne so I think it's worth my once in a while!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Find the best available bagel and cream cheese. Apply caviar to cream cheese schmear, savor with champagne sips. Repeat as needed until either caviar or champagne runs out. 

 

Then come back with a report and request for suggestions as what to do with whatever hasn't run out.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

Would you consider eating your caviar with vodka instead?

 

Many years ago, when I was working closely with the USSR*, I was regularly treated to caviar feasts, both in Moscow and London.  It was always served with champagne - in Russia with Russian champagne (surprisingly good) and in London with the real French deal.

Also, caviar was nearly always served on its own or simply with blinis and sour cream. It is not something you want to complicate. Caviar is a real prima donna and doesn't take well to being overshadowed.

 

* No, I am not  a spy, nor have I ever been a spy (which is exactly what a spy would say, I know). A bit more explanation here.

Edited by liuzhou (log)
  • Like 4

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Many years ago, when I was working closely with the USSR*, I was regularly treated to caviar feasts, both in Moscow and London.  It was always served with champagne - in Russia with Russian champagne (surprisingly good) and in London with the real French deal.

Also, caviar was nearly always served on its own or simply with blinis and sour cream. It is not something you want to complicate. Caviar is a real prima donna and doesn't take well to being overshadowed.

 

* No, I am not  a spy, nor have I ever been a spy (which is exactly what a spy would say, I know). A bit more explanation here.

That story is fantastic... really moving.  It does remind me of stories I've heard from my parents who traveled to the USSR many years ago - probably around the 70s?  I'm not quite sure, but it was uncommon for Americans to travel there for tourism and while they were there, they had a mandatory guide that would meet them every morning and not leave them until back in their hotel at night.  They were only allowed to go to approved places and approved restaurants.  From what I remember, in general, the food was not very good, with the exception of water glasses filled with caviar at practically every meal that they would just eat with a spoon like you would ice cream.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, KennethT said:

That story is fantastic... really moving.  It does remind me of stories I've heard from my parents who traveled to the USSR many years ago - probably around the 70s?  I'm not quite sure, but it was uncommon for Americans to travel there for tourism and while they were there, they had a mandatory guide that would meet them every morning and not leave them until back in their hotel at night.  They were only allowed to go to approved places and approved restaurants.  From what I remember, in general, the food was not very good, with the exception of water glasses filled with caviar at practically every meal that they would just eat with a spoon like you would ice cream.

 

Thanks. It was in the 1980s that I was there a lot. Natasha wasn't mandated but necessary for me to do my work. I was free to go most places. I lived very near a large tourist hotel where many foreigners stayed - usually in tour groups.  Every day, there were gangs of young, male (usually) Russians outside the hotel selling far from the best caviar at vastly inflated prices. Inside was mostly full of young, female Russians trading in a very different commodity.

 

I used to hang out in a hidden bar in the basement. Unlike in the main bar, which was usually full of drunken Finns (alcohol in Finland was extremely expensive (still is), so a lot of visitors from that country thought the bar was cheap (it wasn't) and rather overdid things), the basement bar took roubles only whereas the main bar only accepted USD. Really it was a bar for the staff and locals. And me. The main offering was local beer (not good) and what the barman called "Cocktail". This was a mix of Georgian Brandy, Russian champagne and decent vodka in equal proportions. Deadly and so cheap it was almost free. In fact, as the evening passed the barman got bored and justkleft the three bottles on the bartop and left us to help ourselves! Luckily, I lived only a short, two minute stagger away.

No caviar was on offer in the basement. I don't remember there being any food. Everything was available upstairs. And I mean everything from caviar to nuclear warheads!

  • Like 3

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

Link to comment
Share on other sites

36 minutes ago, liuzhou said:

 

Thanks. It was in the 1980s that I was there a lot. Natasha wasn't mandated but necessary for me to do my work. I was free to go most places. I lived very near a large tourist hotel where many foreigners stayed - usually in tour groups.  Every day, there were gangs of young, male (usually) Russians outside the hotel selling far from the best caviar at vastly inflated prices. Inside was mostly full of young, female Russians trading in a very different commodity.
 

 

Eggs are eggs.

 

The last time I served caviar was dinner for a (relatively) recent coworker and his wife and daughter.  The daughter was about the age of my young sons, and they liked each other, having met before at their house.  Her parents refused to taste the caviar (best caviar the provincial town of Princeton had on offer), so of course she didn't either.  Because she wouldn't, neither would my sons.  There may also have been oysters.  They didn't fly far either.  Wine was grand cru Chablis.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've never had super expensive caviar, but I've had some mildly expensive.  SO good.  I'm a purist.  Just give me a spoon --I think they are supposed to be made out of Mother of Pearl.  Blini and creme fresh for every third bite or so.  Icy cold champagne.  

 

I seem to be mentioning @kayba lot lately lol.  But, she likes to take baby potato halves and spread caviar on top.  They look delicious.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmm......what to do.......

Well, you could try Gabrielle Hamilton's caviar sandwich:

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/19/magazine/caviar-sandwich-holiday-gift.html

 

On New Year's Eve, before my brother and I were old enough to go out to parties, my parents, in a not-typical gesture, would sometimes leave a party in order to come home by midnight. They would treat us to caviar at midnight. Their choice of beverage was often ice cold vodka. So, caviar was a once-a-year thing for me, and still is.  Now we buy American caviar, some of which is really delicious, and we make the above sandwiches on NYE. I know GH has had a long nostalgic relationship to Pepperidge Farms white bread, but I don't; my husband bakes a very good white loaf that's makes a fine sandwich. I'm sure PF is also great, one a year.

 

The first time I had caviar was at a very fancy party, some friends of my parents. There was what to me seemed like a tub of it, and there were little mother-of-pearl spoons for dipping in. I remember being transported and it is possible that I didn't even know what it was. I found out quick enough. I was more than happy eating it right off the spoon.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Shelby said:

I've never had super expensive caviar, but I've had some mildly expensive.  SO good.  I'm a purist.  Just give me a spoon --I think they are supposed to be made out of Mother of Pearl.  Blini and creme fresh for every third bite or so.  Icy cold champagne.  

 

I seem to be mentioning @kayba lot lately lol.  But, she likes to take baby potato halves and spread caviar on top.  They look delicious.

I don't think MoP is necessary - just something non-metallic as it can react with the caviar.  I know you're never supposed to use silver - I don't know whether stainless steel is ok.  Since we don't have any MoP spoons, we'll use either plastic spoons (classy) or maybe a porcelain soup spoon.

 

As for the champagne, I know exactly what do to with that. Definitely not ice cold, and served in a wine glass, rather than a flute - it brings out the aromas so much better.

  • Like 5
Link to comment
Share on other sites

9 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Eggs are eggs.

 

I always thought the oeufs et caviar presentation where warm, creamy scrambled eggs are served in their shells topped with a few chives, cream and a big dollop of caviar was quite perfect with champagne but after watching @AAQuesada's video of Jeremiah Tower piling the caviar on potato chips, I might have to change my mind!  

I also might need to go buy some caviar and make those eggs!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

I always thought the oeufs et caviar presentation where warm, creamy scrambled eggs are served in their shells topped with a few chives, cream and a big dollop of caviar


So true ... the Jean George Caviar Egg is something in its simplicity I always admired (yet never made). Thanks for reminding me to add it on my “try to cook” list again ...

 

JEAN-GEORGES_caviar-768x510.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it goes well with bone marrow. One of these types of fatty + delicate combinations.

I can recall in my mind Ferran Adria use to do it... in a couple of searches online you may find how to do, as I never taste that combination.

Personally, If I got that gift, I would go straight to taste and enjoy the champagne...

 

I wish I were an expert on caviar, but it is far beyond my pocket....

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...