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Dr. Teeth

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  1. Had a rare kid’s activity free Sunday and got very much overdue chance to try the Green Zone for brunch. It was as good as reported. Wife and the three little teeth had a super time (yes, we took the kids to a bar) Now that the world is starting to open again, if egulleteers ever wanted to have a DC meet up, this would be a fantastic place.
  2. Dr. Teeth

    Lunch 2022

    Any Mom gets to do what she likes on Mother’s Day. Zeppole appetizers for everyone Two Amy’s is great choice for pizza. Obelisk, high is owned by the same people is also super. DC has upped it’s pizza game though. There are now a few places that can compete with Amy’s
  3. Congratulations on the niece! I may be about to not answer your question, but these would be my thoughts. Red Truck, if it is open when you are driving past is a GREAT bakery. But it’s not NOVA. Praline which is in southern Maryland is French and super. Buzz Bakery is really great and is in NOVA. Blondie’s Doughnut, is not French, but they are super and they deliver.
  4. Re: Hot Browns. May attempt them this year for the family. Web site for the Brown Hotel is open that the listed recipe is authentic except for the Mornay sauce. I’m a bit surprised that the mornay is pecorino only, but I’ve never eaten at the Brown Hotel. Anyone who’s eaten a hot brown willing to say what they thought was in the Mornay? Thanks
  5. Along these lines, Chris Schlesinger had a recipe for a mango pineapple daiquiri that I thought was great when I made it with friends back in my 20’s. (This should smack of an endorsement of highly dubious value.) It was roughly: 1 pineapple, top and bottom cut off, quartered 2 mangos peeled Zero of 3 limes 1/2 cup sugar vanilla bean quart amber rum pint dark rum pint white rum all tossed into a large glass jar. Age in fridge. it would probably work with paw paws substituted for mangos.
  6. Gives me an excuse for the feast of seven fishes thread I wanted to start
  7. You have already gotten some very good suggestions. My thoughts would be: 1) Best option would be for your aunt to buy your cousin a gift certificate to pick out a nakiri himself with the help of a clerk at a place that specializes in Japanese knives. Knife preference is very personal and without a budget or a real sense of how your cousin cooks it’s a hard question. That out of the way, some knives I would look at would be: 2) Toyama 210mm nakiri is usually the one the guys on the knife forums recommend as a dream knife. I have used, not owned one once. It’s a great knife, the cost, is daunting. About 400 bucks and you need to hunt one down. For me, it’s more than I would spend on a knife. 3) The Watanabe 180mm kurochi nakiri JoNorvilleWalker mentioned. I own one, I love it. It is also considered a classic on the knife forums. Watanabe has bumped his prices a couple times since I bought and is about to raise them again. Cost is maybe 250 and most folks will tell you to upgrade the handle which would be more. This is a great knife. 4) The Mac mentioned is a very fine knife, but shorter, lighter and a bump down in quality from a handmade knife. It is still super high quality, better than most cooks will ever use and is also less work to maintain than the above knives. 5) The knife gurus on the site will object to the following suggestion, but I have a Global G5 which sees more use than anything on my knife bar and I couldn’t be happier with it. Easy to maintain and I don’t get flustered when I see my wife or kids using it. 6) the Mac and the global can be found on sale if one is patient, the Watanabe and the Toyama not so much. good luck with your search
  8. As others have said, it’s worth a try if you like that kind of burger: thin and heavily charred. I will say Freddie’s, if there is one near you produces a higher quality burger of the same type. They also toss their fries in a rosemary concoction of some sort. This annoys the hell out of me. But others may disagree.
  9. Is this the district cutlery in union station? If so, do you like their work? Have a couple of knives that are beyond my ability to sharpen.
  10. Flavor Bible Culinary Artistry
  11. What he said. I use it for a couple things, but mostly because it’s there. Almost everything it does could be done, albeit more slowly, with the heel of a non Japanese chef’s knife. I love my knives, but one day when the kids move out and I squire Mrs Dr Teeth to an intimate romantic downsized local, it will find its way to a yard sale.
  12. Happy to be specific. First, I’m not one of those folks who’s down on All Clad. I have a 12” MC frying pan I bought on deep sale for $68 about 25 years ago which is easily the best money I ever spent on cookware. I also misspoke slightly, the saucepan I have is from their stainless line, which when I bought was the same thickness as the MC with a stainless cladding, to the extent it makes any difference. I have a couple Sitram saucepans with disc bases that heat far more evenly than the All Clad and cost me much less. I bought them at a place called China Fair in the Boston area that sold a combination of restaurant supply and overstock and when looking online I’m not sure exactly what current Sitram line they correspond to, although even the more expensive Sitram lines seem cheaper than AC. I have a couple Demeyre saucepans and a Faulk CopperCore evasee which are simply better pans, but more expensive. Also, and this really is fightin words, but before we met Mrs Dr Teeth used to be a Pampered Chef salesperson/kingpin. She had a plethora of pans, knives and other things given as samples including some saucepans. A few of the ones with disc bases just work better than my AC as much as it pains me to admit it. I guess I would recommend the Sitram to anyone shopping who felt demeyre or falk was excessively expensive.
  13. Kenji Lopez-Alt and Serious Eats are the only reviewers who seem to like the made in pans. I consider Kenji and Serious Eats to have the integrity of a TV infomercial at 2 AM. With a negative review from CI, I personally would stay away. I have the All Clad 4 quart saucepan in MC. mine is probably 25 years old. I bought it/ asked for it as a Christmas present because it fit their steamer and double boiler insert. I was cooking for 2 at the time and used it as a pasta pot for short shapes as well. It saw a lot of use. For those things it’s fine, although the handles get more annoying with a pot that’s full of water and thus heavier. As a saucepan, hard pass. All Clad does frying pans fairly well. Saucepans not so much. Base is too thin, gets hot spots. I have a number of much less expensive (and more expensive) saucepans that blow all clad out of the water.
  14. So as I understand the science of brining, first you make a hypertonic saline solution. Gradually diffusion through a semi permeable membrane increases the saline concentration inside the cell, and then water follows pulled in by on oncotic pressure. The net result is increased water inside the cells of the meat. Water expands when it freezes. This can result in cells bursting which is what sometimes causes frozen meat to be mushy. More water = more bursting = more mushy. Theoretically. Haven’t done it so I don’t know what the real word results are. I’ve eaten a bunch of pre-brined frozen meat things which were fine, I guess but there may be some tricks I’m not following. long winded way to say I’m not sure, but trying on a small cut first is probably a good idea. I’d be interested in the results I buy and cut up Costco pork lions a couple times a year.
  15. So comments from 10,000 feet. Before I start let me say this is the kind of advice I hate to be given. First some background. Mrs Dr Teeth is very sensitive to clutter. Dr Teeth himself floats between not noticing clutter and being clutter. The problem you have is that your kitchen has too much clutter. Your solution is buying a large, heavy, greasy iron griddle. This is analogous to saying “My life is too complicated, I should really have children.” I would suggest you may wish to check your calculations again. Perhaps getting rid of enough minimally used items that the electric griddle could have a happy home in your kitchen would be a better solution. I would now like to apologize for my hypocrisy and unwanted advice.
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