Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Okanagancook

Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)

Recommended Posts

1 hour ago, Shelby said:

I can't resist

 

IMG_4252.JPG.1e24f8412c7ba8e06a52adb8c4333352.JPG

I want a full report, please.

 

  • Like 3

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Waiting with bated breath.... I want tasting notes and everything! 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

maybe that Brew would do nicely in an

 

MR set up ?

 

apparently the way to go now is with the iSi

 

in RED 

 

in the morning, when things are not quite so ' fizzy '

 

im on to this.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

63E4CAB1-5EBD-41B2-9172-7B04F7D57D8F.thumb.jpeg.9402aeec25549a05c27e934ec66defd7.jpeg

 

 It’s about the gravy dontcha know? And since I gorged on meat yesterday there is only a smidgen on the plate today.

 

 A piece of bottom blade was cooked in the instant pot with carrots and onions for 50 minutes at high pressure and with natural release. I took out the meat and poured the cooking liquid and vegetables into a separator.  I put the vegetables and liquid back into the Instant Pot and blitzed them with my stick blender. I then added a couple of teaspoons of Bisto  to boost the flavour.  This was then poured over the meat which I had put aside. I added a cup of water to the Instant Pot, added a steamer insert with the carrots and cooked them for three minutes on high pressure with quick release. I added the green beans and brought the IP back up to pressure for one minute with quick release.

Did I mention that I love my instant pot? I’m hoping my replacement base for the mini will be here on Monday.

  • Like 8
  • Delicious 1

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would put your pot in a ventilated area due to the carbon dioxide your wine is giving off...not sure how vigorously it is bubbling.

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, Okanagancook said:

I would put your pot in a ventilated area due to the carbon dioxide your wine is giving off...not sure how vigorously it is bubbling.

It's in the middle of the kitchen with the windows open so I think it's ok.  

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm going to ask a stupid question: what makes IP better than my stovetop pressure cooker? Is there any reason to switch?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Orbit said:

I'm going to ask a stupid question: what makes IP better than my stovetop pressure cooker? Is there any reason to switch?

 In very few words – – set it and forget it. Stovetop pressure cooker needs your attention. You must wait till it reaches pressure and then adjust the heat beneath it and you must be ready to move it off the heat when it is finished cooking. 

 

When you are finished prepping whatever you need to do with your ingredients you can bang them into the instant pot, press a button or two and walk away.  It will reach pressure on its own and when the cooking time is complete it will shut off. It will also if you wish keep your food warm until you are ready for it. 

  • Like 6

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Anna N said:

 In very few words – – set it and forget it. Stovetop pressure cooker needs your attention. You must wait till it reaches pressure and then adjust the heat beneath it and you must be ready to move it off the heat when it is finished cooking. 

 

When you are finished prepping whatever you need to do with your ingredients you can bang them into the instant pot, press a button or two and walk away.  It will reach pressure on its own and when the cooking time is complete it will shut off. It will also if you wish keep your food warm until you are ready for it. 

In fewer words.

 

It makes wine.

 

 

:PxD

 

Anna is right.  The ease and the keeping things warm are the stand outs. 

 

The IP makes excellent yogurt.....

 

And it makes wine.....

  • Like 3
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Shelby said:

In fewer words.

 

It makes wine.

 

 

:PxD

 

Anna is right.  The ease and the keeping things warm are the stand outs. 

 

The IP makes excellent yogurt.....

 

And it makes wine.....

This morning I took the carcass of a rotisserie chicken - stripped off any chunks of meat - popped it into the IP with a couple of litres of water, an onion I had cut in half with the skin still on, half a big old carrot cut lengthwise and a stalk of celery. I set it for full pressure for two hours - left for work. When I got home it had been kept warm for 4 hours - strained out the stuff, added the other half of the onion finely diced, the rest of the carrot diced, one of the nice middle celery stalks diced - set it for 2 minutes full pressure while we went to pick up the child from the sitter. When we got back it had been kept warm for about 45 minutes. I added in the chicken bits, some cold rice from the fridge - and soup was ready for dinner.  No time spent in front of the stove waiting for it to reach pressure or waiting to turn it off when it had been at pressure for the right amount of time. 

 

And it makes wine...

  • Like 3
  • Haha 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

This morning I took the carcass of a rotisserie chicken - stripped off any chunks of meat - popped it into the IP with a couple of litres of water, an onion I had cut in half with the skin still on, half a big old carrot cut lengthwise and a stalk of celery. I set it for full pressure for two hours - left for work. When I got home it had been kept warm for 4 hours - strained out the stuff, added the other half of the onion finely diced, the rest of the carrot diced, one of the nice middle celery stalks diced - set it for 2 minutes full pressure while we went to pick up the child from the sitter. When we got back it had been kept warm for about 45 minutes. I added in the chicken bits, some cold rice from the fridge - and soup was ready for dinner.  No time spent in front of the stove waiting for it to reach pressure or waiting to turn it off when it had been at pressure for the right amount of time. 

 

And it makes wine...

How did it compare to other con broths you've made?  Would you use that process again next time!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, lindag said:

How did it compare to other con broths you've made?  Would you use that process again next time!

It's my go to method for making chicken broth. Almost every rotisserie chicken ends it's life this way. 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

It's my go to method for making chicken broth. Almost every rotisserie chicken ends it's life this way. 

Mine too.  Although I leave chicken bits on carcass and remove meat after making broth.  Chicken bits still have enough flavor after cooking to make chicken salad (mayo covers multitude of sins).

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

It's my go to method for making chicken broth. Almost every rotisserie chicken ends it's life this way. 

 

Me too! I think it's wonderful! 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Orbit said:

I'm going to ask a stupid question: what makes IP better than my stovetop pressure cooker? Is there any reason to switch?

 

It's also really handy when the weather is hot. A stovetop PC will require a burner on for a considerable time. The Instant Pot doesn't. It generates very little heat. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the Instant Pot can be used as either pressure cooker or slow cooker, plus has some delayed-start modes. I never use the delayed start, but I think some people use it for oatmeal for breakfast, for example. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok.  First batch is out of the IP and into it's fancy bottle :P.

 

It looks like.....grape juice wine....lol

 

It smells like wine.  A little yeasty and it still has fizz to it.  We tasted a spoon- full--it's really not bad.  Actually I would deem it good. If you don't like sweet red wine, you will not like this, but we do.  It reminds me of moscato.  Very much like moscato.  It's now down in the basement in a dark cabinet to rest.  The author of this recipe drinks it after 8 days.  I'm going to try to wait a bit longer...but we will see.

 

IMG_4262.JPG.de1ea8990c9737c81ef0f175504b455c.JPG

 

IMG_4264.JPG.06e7ab5136f7eaee42a84229941fe4ad.JPG

 

I have another batch going now.

 

I managed to spill some on my shirt.....I hope I don't get a DUI on my way to the bathroom.  

  • Like 3
  • Haha 9

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Shelby  Are you making another pot of red or are you going to try some white?  It will be interesting to see how sweet the wine is after 8 days.  Considerably less so, i suspect.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, ElsieD said:

@Shelby  Are you making another pot of red or are you going to try some white?  It will be interesting to see how sweet the wine is after 8 days.  Considerably less so, i suspect.

I would be pleased if it's a bit less sweet.    I have another pot of red going but white will be next.  It's a fun, easy project :) 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oolala, 8 day aged wine:P

if is too sweet you could leave it to ferment longer to reduce the sweetness, especially seeing you said it is still a little fizzy.  Of course you will have more alcohol as long as the alcohol percentage doesn’t get too high and kill the yeast.

better check the container daily to ensure it is still in one piecexD

 cool project.

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Shelby said:

I would be pleased if it's a bit less sweet.    I have another pot of red going but white will be next.  It's a fun, easy project :) 

 

 I am so tickled that someone here took this on. Should have thought that @Shelby might be the one!  xD

  • Like 3
  • Haha 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

C1F26196-1B80-4096-82CB-EFC6805766AC.thumb.jpeg.947803e673c44354c90ecb89743c13fe.jpeg

 

4 lb. Commerial Corned Beef (soaked in water for an hour and rinsed) cooked for 75 minutes (with one 12 oz. beer, three cups water, one stalk celery halved and one half onion, sliced, and seasoning packet) at High pressure, 20 minute Natural Release; Meat removed from pot, tented with foil and allowed to rest while the Vegetables were cooked in the beef cooking liquid for 5 minutes, High pressure, Quick Release.


Edited by robirdstx (log)
  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...