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Okanagancook

Instant Pot. Multi-function cooker (Part 5)

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8 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

My "white wine" has been transferred to the bottles and taped shut as instructed.  In case they decide to explode, i have put them into the never used soaker tub, which is deep enough that should the "wine" erupt, it will be contained in the tub.  Many years ago I made dandelion wine.  All of the bottles exploded,, one after the other in the space of about 5 minutes.  Fortunately, they were in an unfinished basement but still.........

Excellent!  I've checked on mine every few days and no eruptions yet.  

Just now, rotuts said:

What happened to

 

@Shelby  's

 

Dy-No-Mite   Red ?

 

hoping she didn't fall into her

 

Cups !

I can't believe it, but I forgot to do the taste test over the weekend.  I've seemingly lost my mind lol

 

We will test here in a bit if I can get time or at the latest tomorrow.

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" dryer is always better "

 

Im guessing  No Oak ?

 

money-mouth.gif.2db8bf4814e3622c629cebc8c6d5b0bf.gif

 

reviewing

 

money-mouth.gif.0dbbace427bf52df16f1f08b9fe6a60a.gif

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Wine update:

 

Still looks the same to me.

 

IMG_4328.JPG.e0c875b766a31e8211b5d047f92b7c26.JPG

I gave the bottle a little shake and it fizzed a bit

 

IMG_4329.JPG.49f9aa1f16d3a1c3b5ec1f49d0ca21bf.JPG

 

It is still mildly fizzy.  Very much like moscato to me.  It's ever so much better than the wine we made years ago.....the fancy way....it tasted worse than Robitussin cough syrup.  

 

IMG_4330.JPG.645d227369825136c9cfbd15d7bb74d1.JPG

 

I'm putting it back down in the dark to age more.  

 

P.S.  Please remember that the lid isn't screwed on tight and if you grab the middle of the bottle where it's kind of squishy, you will get wine all over the kitchen.

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10 minutes ago, Shelby said:

 

 

 

 

P.S.  Please remember that the lid isn't screwed on tight and if you grab the middle of the bottle where it's kind of squishy, you will get wine all over the kitchen.

 

Personal experience?

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On 8/10/2017 at 8:16 AM, robirdstx said:

IMG_0645.thumb.JPG.f7469e69cf674c4850499b02f73eb71e.JPG

 

Crispy Pork Carnitas - these will be making an appearance in the Dinner Topic!

 

The Pork Steak was cubed and then sautéed in a bit of olive oil in the Instant Pot. 1/2 cup Pork Bone Broth, 1/2 cup Orange Juice, a splash of Lime Juice, ground Cumin, dried Mexican Oregano, Kosher Salt, ground Black Pepper and lots of minced Garlic were whisked together and poured over the browned pork, then cooked on High Pressure for 30 minutes, Natural Release for 15 minutes. The pork was transferred to a foil lined sheet pan, 1/3 of the cooking liquid was spooned over the meat and broiled in the oven for 5 minutes. The pan was removed from the oven, the meat was tossed and returned to the oven for another 5 minutes under the broiler.

 

 

 

It’s time to make another batch of pork shoulder to use for Crispy Carnitas. 

 

63CFE76F-3FE2-43B0-A093-EA43D6F0DFC8.thumb.jpeg.5b872c66051414eaa9e7d3e254dab679.jpeg

 

I changed up the cooking liquid this time and used 1/2 cup Salsa Verde, 1/2 cup 505 brand Roasted Hatch Chiles and 1/3 cup Orange Juice. The result is two containers of pork ready to crisp up under the broiler!

 

DD0FE10C-5823-4273-9286-9E12914B3D12.thumb.jpeg.6576212122f3fd43b57e8d7d1ec335c4.jpeg

 

 

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@robirdstx

 

What cut of pork meat to you use for your carnitas ?

 

they really look tasty once they get to the crispy state.

 

love the idea of cooking in green chili

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14 minutes ago, rotuts said:

@robirdstx

 

What cut of pork meat to you use for your carnitas ?

 

they really look tasty once they get to the crispy state.

 

love the idea of cooking in green chili

 

6368E69B-3006-48C1-97C4-548CC7D85008.thumb.jpeg.d8eda9da5baf59ed6e11f6cf04d6b946.jpeg

 

For this batch, I used about 36 oz. from this Pork Shoulder Butt Roast. The remainder of the roast has been divided into two portions and stored in the freezer for future use.


Edited by robirdstx (log)
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With a shout-out to @Shelby for the original post and IP timing here, I made a small Muffuletta Cheesecake from Taste of Home's recipe for a gathering today. I used the 3-quart IP, so made a half-sized cheesecake. I should probably be more careful about taking an untried recipe to a gathering of people I don't know, but hey - what's life without the occasional no-net tightwire walk? xD I'll report back with a picture and response. FWIW I got distracted during the cooking and, although it was 20 minutes on high, the natural release was on the order of 35 minutes - entirely natural - instead of 10 minutes natural followed by a quick release, as Shelby had done. I hope it doesn't matter.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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2 minutes ago, Smithy said:

With a shout-out to @Shelby for the original post and IP timing here, I made a small Muffuletta Cheesecake from Taste of Home's recipe for a gathering today. I used the 3-quart IP, so made a half-sized cheesecake. I should probably be more careful about taking an untried recipe to a gathering of people I don't know, but hey - what's life without the occasional no-net tightwire walk? xD I'll report back with a picture and response. FWIW I got distracted during the cooking and, although it was 20 minutes on high, the natural release was on the order of 35 minutes - entirely natural - instead of 10 minutes natural followed by a quick release, as Shelby had done. I hope it doesn't matter.

I bet it's great!!!!  Can't wait to see pictures :) 

 

Thanks for the reminder....I need to make this again.

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6 hours ago, Smithy said:

With a shout-out to @Shelby for the original post and IP timing here, I made a small Muffuletta Cheesecake from Taste of Home's recipe for a gathering today. I used the 3-quart IP, so made a half-sized cheesecake. I should probably be more careful about taking an untried recipe to a gathering of people I don't know, but hey - what's life without the occasional no-net tightwire walk? xD I'll report back with a picture and response. FWIW I got distracted during the cooking and, although it was 20 minutes on high, the natural release was on the order of 35 minutes - entirely natural - instead of 10 minutes natural followed by a quick release, as Shelby had done. I hope it doesn't matter.

 

That looks good. I had to save that recipe. It reminds me a bit of the crabmeat cheesecake from Palace Cafe, which was my first encounter with savory cheesecake (and I very nearly, as my grandmother would have said, "foundered myself."

 

Recipe here.

 

 

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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On 3/16/2018 at 5:50 PM, Anna N said:

...set it and forget it. Stovetop pressure cooker needs your attention. You must wait till it reaches pressure and then adjust the heat beneath it and you must be ready to move it off the heat when it is finished cooking. 

Well, yeah, kinda, but it's not a big deal—not with the stove-top pressure cookers I've used—which have been many.

Several models of Mirro, Presto, Hawkins, Kuhn Rikon, and All-American.

I've used them so much that I can tell what's going on by the sound—I just make two minor adjustments during the cooking process.

I know my stoves settings for each adjustment.

High heat to start—the 2 adjustments, after the PC comes up to temperature, are "3" to cook and then "off." Quite simple.

IMO, the so-called, set-it-and-forget-it 'advantage' of electric pressure cookers is canceled out by the points I've posted previously...

 

"The insert is easy to clean.

It requires about as much cleaning time as the entire stove-top pressure cooker.

Then there's the lid. The multi-piece lid.

Then the pressure cooker body, the cord and the counter-top.

 

Something else that I found irritating.

When it came time to pour the PC'd chiles and some of the other ingredients into the blender, it required fiddling with pot-holders to handle the insert, where the stove-up PC requires simply grabbing the handles and pouring.

 

The clean-up and fiddling around as well as other differences required an additional ~20 minutes compared to using the stove-top PC."

 

Advantage, by far, stove-top pressure cookers!

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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On 3/20/2018 at 12:59 PM, Anna N said:

I am going to try to convert my favourite chowder recipe from the Canadian book   Looneyspoons. 

 

Here is the ingredient list:

1 Tbs olive oil (original calls for spray PAM) 
1/2cup chopped onions 
1/2cup chopped mushrooms 
1 clove garlic, minced 
1 can (5 ozs) clams and their juice 
1cup low salt chicken broth 
1/4 cup dry white wine 
3/4 cup peeled, cubed potatoes 
1/4 cup chopped celery 
1/8 cup chopped green onions 
1/4 lb fish fillets (cod, haddock or salmon) 
-- cut into chunks 
3/8 tsp dried basil 
1/2 tsp Worcestershire sauce 
drops Tabasco 
1/4 tsp each salt and pepper 
1 Tbs chopped parsley 
3 Tbs 35% cream 
3/8cup sour cream

 

 More ingredients certainly but still using canned clams and it is delicious. 

 

Thanks for listening. xD

 

 I think it's actually missing an ingredient—a dab of fish saucexD

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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19 hours ago, Shelby said:

I bet it's great!!!!  Can't wait to see pictures :) 

 

Thanks for the reminder....I need to make this again.

 

It was good. I came home with only 2 small pieces left, and I didn't see anyone making faces after they tasted it. :B Unfortunately, I didn't get any pictures. I had to assemble it there, and there wasn't time to whip out the cell phone.

 

12 hours ago, kayb said:

 

That looks good. I had to save that recipe. It reminds me a bit of the crabmeat cheesecake from Palace Cafe, which was my first encounter with savory cheesecake (and I very nearly, as my grandmother would have said, "foundered myself."

 

Recipe here.

 

 

 

 

That also looks good! I've saved that recipe. Thanks for the link, and for the new phrase. "Foundered myself" sounds like something my grandmother would have said as well. 

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I'm another fan of the "set and forget" convenience of an electric pressure cooker. 

7 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

Well, yeah, kinda, but it's not a big deal—not with the stove-top pressure cookers I've used—which have been many.

Several models of Mirro, Presto, Hawkins, Kuhn Rikon, and All-American.

I've used them so much that I can tell what's going on by the sound—I just make two minor adjustments during the cooking process.

I know my stoves settings for each adjustment.

High heat to start—the 2 adjustments, after the PC comes up to temperature, are "3" to cook and then "off." Quite simple.

IMO, the so-called, set-it-and-forget-it 'advantage' of electric pressure cookers is canceled out by the points I've posted previously...

 

I appreciate that a stove that you can easily set as you describe would be a big help with a stovetop pressure cooker.  Others have posted about using a stovetop pressure cooker with an induction cooktop with similar ease.  I have gas burners with no discrete settings so it's always listen, listen, listen, fiddle, fiddle, fiddle. Listen, listen, come back 10 min later and fiddle some more.  And there's still the highly variable time to get up to pressure, depending on the volume and starting temp of the contents.  

 

So for me, the set and forget convenience is very much worth the small amount of additional clean up time (maybe 1-3 min at most) and learning how best to use the little silicone mitts to grip and pour from the pot on the occasions that's needed.  I do a lot of pot-in-pot cooking so that's not a regular issue.

 

Different strokes ... :)

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On 3/31/2018 at 2:21 AM, DiggingDogFarm said:

as well as other differences

 

One of those differences is the fact that electrics are slower, that require more time to reach maximum pressure/maximum temperature.

Maximum pressure/maximum temperature is lower, so they cook slower than stove-tops.

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)

~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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22 hours ago, blue_dolphin said:

 

Different strokes ... :)

 

Yes, exactly.

 

Laura Pazzaglia says:

"match the cooker to your cooking personality"

 

  • Electric pressure cookers are best for..
    •  those who are nervous about fiddling with heat settings – the electric cooker will do it automatically, just set it and forget it;
    • those who are drowning in electric appliances like slow cooker, rice cooker and yogurt maker – an electric pressure cooker will replace all of them;
    • busy parents who need to schedule dinner to be ready when they walk in the door will appreciate the cooking delay timer available in some models which starts cooking dinner before anyone is home;
    • college students or persons with limited kitchens – the electric pressure cooker is a complete cooking tool it browns/saute’s, pressure cooks and keep the food warm – some do even more;
    • seniors and/or otherwise abled persons-no need to remember if the burner is on or off, the cooker will turn itself off after cooking  and can be placed at any height for easy access
    •  
  • Stove top Pressure Cookers are best for..
    • those who want speed and power since they reach higher heat and pressure than electrics;
    • those who value durability over convenience – electrics can last years but stove top cookers last decades, generations;
    • cooks who want to try advanced pressure cooking techniques -many require the higher pressure and lesser evaporation of modern stove top cookers;
    • cooks who like to tinker and supervise the cooking since the pressure releases faster than electrics.

Source: Hip Pressure Cooking, THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN STOVE TOP AND ELECTRIC PRESSURE COOKERS

 


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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 Valid comparisons. But I am with @blue_dolphin and hundreds and thousands of others.  The world is big enough for both views, I hope. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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4 hours ago, DiggingDogFarm said:

 

One of those differences is the fact that electrics are slower, that require more time to reach maximum pressure/maximum temperature.

Maximum pressure/maximum temperature is lower, so they cook slower than stove-tops.

 

 

 

When I was testing recipes for my first pressure cooker book, which included versions for both electric and stove top models, I didn't find much difference in timing for the two versions. The electric models do take longer to reach pressure, but the difference in pressure levels rarely required a different cooking time once the pots reached pressure (and it was more often a shorter time for the electric than for the stove top). So, yes, using an electric pressure cooker increases total time, but for most dishes, it was only a matter of 5 to 10 minutes.

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Quick question for Instant Pot users (not other brands, in this case): have you ever gotten a "burn" message (I think in some models the message is "overheat")? If so, what were the circumstances, and were you able to fix it, or did you get the message multiple times? I'm consulting on a pressure cooker book, and the author seems to get this message often. Since I've never had that happen, I'm at a loss to try to figure out what she's doing that causes it. 

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27 minutes ago, chefmd said:

@JAZ Never had it happen

Ditto


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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1 minute ago, robirdstx said:

 

Another ditto.

Not yet, and I’ve done some questionable thing as far as liquid levels go.


Formerly "Quiltguy"

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COMMON REASONS FOR INSTANT POT BURN MESSAGE AND HOW TO AVOID IT

It's also mentioned in 'troubleshooting' on the Instant Pot website.


Edited by DiggingDogFarm (log)
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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Me either. Probably use mine 1x or 2x a week.

 


Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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