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Dinner 2016 (Part 5)


liuzhou
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Pressure-cooked curry base.

Taken from this fine gent - Vah (I love his stuff): 

 

 

Enriched mine with powdered green cardamom, cinnamon and a pinch of fenugreek powder (a tiny bit). Tastes very good on its own once cooled, will use it with meat tomorrow. I know it does not look like much. It was just tonight's dinner, with some fresh pan-cooked naan (no pics taken).

 

For me, it is the thing to do when I have plenty of ripe tomatoes ready to spoil and onions lying around. 

 

 

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@zend

 

I love egg curries but 1 CUP of chili powder?   I know he is using 2 kilograms of vegetables but even so somebody must have a stomach of steel or they're buying a different chilli powder (Mine is Indian!). Of course I would adjust to taste still.....  Whew.  

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Hi Anna,

I should have been more clear - I used gochukaru - the Korean chile powder - and probably less than 1 cup - about 6 tbsp (I err on the spicy side). I have not put eggs in it yet, just gobbled it up on bread / naan :). It is hot, but bearable.

LE: I also used 4 tbsp of 1:1 garlic-ginger paste, 1.5 tsp kosher salt and 1 tbsp sugar, which may not be exactly the quantities shown in the video. YMMV

Edited by zend
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8 minutes ago, zend said:

Hi Anna,

I should have been more clear - I used gochukaru - the Korean chile powder - and probably less than 1 cup - about 6 tbsp (I err on the spicy side). I have not put eggs in it yet, just gobbled it up on bread / naan :). It is hot, but bearable.

That's OK. I just had to remark on it. Cooking always calls for some adjutment to one's taste.  I do a fair amount of Indian cooking so I do know the power of Indian spices!   He uses salt, oil  and spices with abandon.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@Norm Matthews, I think forgetting the garnish is becoming my signature trademark.  Apparently, in my rush to put out hot food, once it's plated, it gets served. Then, as I'm constructing my plate, I spy the chopped parsley, slivered almonds, deseeded lemon wedges or whatever already prepped on the counter and ready to go. I go around to everyone's plate distributing it as they are eating. It's happened so often, it's become a joke.

 

I had to make a grocery run this evening, so dinner was a quickie. Corned beef and muenster on french bread with shredded iceberg, a thinly sliced and flavorful tomato, green pepper, and raw white onion only on mine. This was served with a haute cuisine side of Tater Tots. Well not really haute cuisine at all :), but we like 'em a lot. Chocolate ice cream with sliced strawberries for dessert.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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A shoulder lamb chop grilled, with Julia Child's 'mustard coating and marinade for lamb', plain boiled potatoes with butter and parsley and grilled vegetables - eggplant, zucchini, red onion and garlic scapes. 

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Eaten out in the gazebo because it was a lovely evening. 

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If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

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Oh hai, I am Tere and my photography skillz are still rubbish. But I tried out a couple of recipes from Salma Hage's The Lebanese Kitchen which I wanted to document. Lamb chops with tahini curry sauce and roasted vegetables. Was slightly annoying to make a lemon tahini sauce only to use a little bit and add some curry powder, but it ate well. And I now have some lemon tahini dressing :D

 

The roasted veggies included aubergine (which I had forgotten to buy) and also included chickpeas, which I liked. Thought her instructions for paprika were a little scant and my paprika is old, so I added a bit more. Should have followed the recipe, but it was still tasty.

 

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Looks like a dog's dinner on the plate, but I still enjoyed it!

 

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Dinner from the weekend, Otter Farm's trout roasted with red onion and fennel, with new potatoes and Nigella's petits pois a la Francaise.

 

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Pork Belly Sous vide in a Asian sauce with green lentils ( braised in Pork broth with bay thyme, onion and garlic..little bit of brown raw sugar27740097122_8338ff35b6_k.jpg  with a side tomato salad in a sherry vinaigrette

 

 

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Its good to have Morels

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Marinated chicken stir fried with various veggies and Shirataki noodles.

I'd never tried these noodles before, but will definitely be buying them again. 

They're silky slippery little things with no need to pre cook.

 

image.jpegimage.jpeg

 

 

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18 minutes ago, Tere said:

Konnyaku, the Japanese dieter's friend!

 

Did you think they tasted of anything? I've never found them very tasty....

 

No, they weren't tasty, I find noodles rarely are. They acted well as a delivery service for the sauce.

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I enjoy the shirataki noodles texture and interest they add to a stir-fry.  I usually simmer them in a heavily soy sauced water first. Could be my imagination but I think they greet the pan better introducing another texture.  Also nice when reheating leftover as they don't swell or get mushy.  I enjoy them in a pumpkin (kabocha) soup with mushrooms and greens and  splash of coconut milk BUT the texture in frozen leftovers is not pleasant for me.

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One of us here is on a diet and the other should be.  So, I too use those noodles for certain things as it provides bulk with very few calories.  If I am making an Asian sort of soup,  I'll use the noodles in that.  If lunch has been a calorific meal, I might make a stir fry of some sort for dinner and use the noodles instead of rice.  You don't eat them because of their taste as they have next to none but if you are counting calories,  for us, they are acceptable for the reasons stated. 

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1 hour ago, Captain said:

It's cold here so time for Pea & Ham soup.  Lovely rich smokey ham hocks. I hate the cold but enjoy making and eating this when it's time.

 

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Hey, I know what you mean about cold, our houses just aren't designed for warmth ! 

I made pea and ham soup yesterday too, it's in the soup topic.

 

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My refrigerator is home to numerous undated, unlabeled bags of sous vide meat.  I'm pretty sure what I had tonight was 72 hour chuck.  I seared it medium well, since I haven't bagged sous vide chuck in months.

 

Served with mashed potato, sometimes dreadful, tonight quite good.  And what was supposed to have been thirty second green beans,  Last night's green beans were indeed thirty second green beans.  These were not.

 

Forty second green beans are OK.  Thirty second green beans are something special.  They are bright green and crunchy.  They snap but they do not bend.

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Tonight's dinner was ground chuck burgers that were freshly ground today at the grocery store. I topped with the usual suspects of grilled onion, melty thick-sliced good American yellow cheese from the deli, iceberg and sliced tomatoes. I made a creamy angel hair herb, garlic and onion pasta side to go with it, and I had a cornichon (labeled "Petite Snack Crunchers" by our NC supplier, in Mt. Olive, NC) and a pickled pepperoncini pepper. It's been a while since I made burgers, and these were so good to both of us.

 

I put my cherished ham bone in the crockpot after dinner, and some large dried lima beans on to soak overnight for tomorrow night's dinner. I'll make either cornbread, if I get a case of the lazies, or my fusion corn pancakes, which combine vegetable Indian uttapam and Southern corn pone if I'm more energetic. Either way, we are in for a great dinner, if the crick don't rise. :)

 

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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image.jpeg

 

Toasties inspired by @rotuts.  Had a few tablespoons of fire-roasted canned tomatoes in the fridge which I cooked down and seasoned well and some already grated cheddar cheese leftover from earlier in the day. Brushed an English muffin with some olive oil and scraped a garlic clove over it.  Toasted the muffin, topped it with the tomatoes and cheese and returned it to the broiler to melt the cheese. 

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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F.D.:  although Ive been making Toasties off and on for a while, they are now very much On due to others here :

 

@sartoric  might have been a catalyst and I think even @Anna N where she used granny smith, onion and cheese.

 

soooooo good for such a small effort.

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I spent more than a few years struggling to make ends meet and still pride myself in many of the efforts I took in doing so. Always on the lookout for a bargain, I ate many a turkey leg and chicken pot pie that were offered at a good price. Money isn't the issue it was then, but old habits die hard and when I see chicken leg quarters on sale for 49 cents a pound, I like to think I am still up to the challenge and I want to try something new. Here you have my latest effort.

I give you the chicken leg quarter:

Chicken leg quarter.jpg

 

 

Trimmed of excess skin, fat and back bone:

Trimmed.jpg

 

Boned out almost complete (this is a task that improves with practice):

Boned.jpg

 

All that is left is to pan fry the cutlet in a little butter, salt, pepper and garlic. When it is just about done, a splash or two of cream sherry to form a pan sauce and you have an entry fit for a dinner party.

HC

Pan fried.JPG

Edited by HungryChris
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