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Shelby

Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2015 – 2016)

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1 hour ago, shain said:

 

To be honest, I usually call it clafoutis, but that's improper if it's not made with cherries. And you definitely should make it.


That's okay... everybody knows what clafoutis is. I want to see the reactions when I serve flaugnarde. I don't suppose I'm lucky enough that it'd be pronounced "flog-nard" but I hope it is. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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OK so I've worked in restaurants and bakeries and done production work over the years but at home I tend NOT to bake that much but just came across a recipe for Salted Pistachio Dark Chocolate Chunk Cookies from Laurie McNamara's book Simply Scratch.  Johnnybird loves dark chocolate and pistachios so.....as long as it cools down a bit on Wednesday I'm going to surprise him with them as a welcome home present.  Wish me luck.

 

So John has finished all the cookies and requested more for his camping trip this coming week.


Edited by suzilightning (log)
  • Like 7

Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Well...I lost half a pan to burnage as I put a pan on the lower shelf in the oven.  Note to self...bake only 1 pan at a time.  They came out rather well if I do say so myself.  The sea salt on top, the chopped pistachios and the 60% chopped up chocolate worked out nicely...crunchy and gooey at the same time with just enough dough to hold them together.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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Version of Valrhona's 3 chocolate entremet.  Not sure how I'll finish it, probably just a dusting of cocoa powder over the top.

Used Dulcey for the top layer in place of Ivoire in the original recipe.  The base is a praline biscuit that I hadn't tried before.  Will certainly use for other similar creations, I could happily have that on its own...

image.jpeg 

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Yet another attempt at recreating the classic (and more & more difficult to find) Baltimore chocolate topped cookie. Still more tweaking to be done... they're tasty but they are not what I am trying to recreate.

IMG_4451-chocolateTopCookie-lowres.jpg

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On 6/7/2016 at 6:05 PM, ElsieD said:

Has any one made the recipe for Marie-Helene's Apple Cake from Around my French table by Doris Greenspan?  It calls for a baking time of 50 to 60 minutes in an 8" springform pan.  I baked mine for 65 minutes, and the batter is not quite cooked through, even though it seemed to be when I did the knife test.  The cake is delicious even if underbaked,  but I wondered if any one else had trouble with it baking in the alloted time.

I have made that cake several times and have made the following changes to the recipe:

  • I use 4 cups of apples cut into 3/4 -inch chunks
  • bake for 60-75 minutes 

 

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Tartlets with ricotta and various stone fruits.

Quick hot-water/no-roll crust. Chopped grilled fruits, topped with some ricotta mixed with honey and egg yolk. Baked to set, then topped with fresh fruit. Honey-amaretto syrup before serving.

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  • Like 16

~ Shai N.

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Your tart looks beautiful @RobertM, I tried to find out more via Google but without success.  Would you give a little more detail?

 

Many thanks.

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First off Tartine is a typo...it's a Tanzanie Tart....the original formula is a Tanzanie & Cola Chocolate tart.

the base layer is a Chocolate Pate Sucree (how do I make accents marks?) that is delicious...I will be using it on other things as well.

then, a layer of caramel....the version in the formula was a bit soft for me (or, I messed up which is more likely the case) and I wanted a more stand-up caramel so, I used my own.  Then a layer of Tanzanine Dark Chocolate Ganache...and since I hadn't touched the bag I picked up at the demo I thought this would be the ideal desert for a recent dinner party...

pit was topped with a chocolate hazelnut streusel except I had no hazelnut flour on hand so I used almond flour....so, it's really a chocolate almond streusel....

everyone seemed to enjoy it.....


Edited by RobertM (log)
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Wanted something fruity. Entremet with vanilla bean bavarois, passion fruit cremeaux, strawberry gelee, vanilla sponge and white chocolate glacage. 

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  • Like 9

"If you hear a voice within you say 'you cannot paint,' then by all means paint, and that voice will be silenced" - Vincent Van Gogh
 

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13584797_1176079465775778_6157222819705330392_o-1.jpg

 

 

Tartlets for a catering tonight.  Dark chocolate hazelnut ganache with candied hazelnuts, cherry-blueberry with streusel, milk chocolate salty caramel ganache with salty caramel cream, and mom's raspberries with vanilla bean chantilly.  Also  few lemon with fresh mango that didn't get captured.

 

The dough for the berry tartlets puffed a little much, so they're not as pretty and clean - TGWC ... Thank god for whipped cream!


Edited by pastrygirl fix pic (log)
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Lately, I've become obsessed with learning to make Thai dok jok, or lotus blossom cookies. You need this brass mold, which I ordered from Thailand, and lime stone paste, or calcium hydroxide, which makes the cookies extra crispy and basically physically unable to ever go soggy.

From there it's just whipping up a batter of rice and tapioca flours, sugar, coconut milk, egg and water and doing the dok jok jiggle. Aren't they pretty?.

Dok jok. Here's a video of me making them: link

 

 

dok1.jpg

dok2.jpg

dok3.jpg

dok4.jpg

 

 

 

 

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@rarerollingobject,

 

Very cool! Thanks for the video, because my brain was trying to short circuit a little trying to figure out how the blossom-like cookies were formed with the straight-sided iron. They remind me of Scandinavian rosettes, which are made on a similar iron with different technique.

 

And yes, yours are very beautiful, more so than rosettes.

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> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Yes, my blurry video kind of skipped over that bit - you take them out of the oil and let them cool on an upside down bowl or similarly-curved thing and as they cool, they harden into that curved shape, like a flower. I didn't have a sufficiently small bowl, so I improvised with some wadded up balls of aluminium foil.


Edited by rarerollingobject (log)
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13 hours ago, gfron1 said:

Those are really pretty pjm333

Thank you Gfron 1

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Bobka.

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The Philip Mahl Community teaching kitchen is now open. Check it out. "Philip Mahl Memorial Kitchen" on Facebook. Website coming soon.

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