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Marlene

Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 4)

597 posts in this topic

3 more for me.

Debbie Moose's Deviled Eggs
Mark Bittman's How to Cook Everything
Mark Bittmans How to Cook Everything Holidays

[Moderator note: The original Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? topic became too large for our servers to handle efficiently, so we've divided it up; the preceding part of this discussion is here: Cookbooks – How Many Do You Own? (Part 3)]


Edited by Mjx Moderator note added. (log)

Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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one more for me. someone put Kitchen Detective by Christopher Kimball (the bow tie wearing dude from Cook's Illustrated and America's Test Kitchen) into my cubby at work. i really like the way this guy writes and the recipes i've tried so far work pretty well.

next up: blue cheese dressing to go over my retro iceberg wedge and jersey tomatoes for my birthday dinner. :biggrin:


Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I am back in Japan after a 6 week trip to the US and have added 17 books to my collection....


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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350


Spam in my pantry at home.

Think of expiration, better read the label now.

Spam breakfast, dinner or lunch.

Think about how it's been pre-cooked, wonder if I'll just eat it cold.

wierd al ~ spam

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I have 123....including 6 Joy of Cooking and about 25 of the regional ones put out by church ladies and other clubs...I collect both.

Newest addition...Mes Confitures, by Christine Ferber. I am a jam making maniac this week!


Don't try to win over the haters. You're not the jackass whisperer."

Scott Stratten

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Score!

Picked up a copy of Cooks Illustrated's "The Best Recipe"...from a remaindered bin at Safeway...for $6.99 CDN (list price $40 CDN).


Fat=flavor

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Include 3 more for me please: The Frog Commissary, The Art of Braising, and Patio Daddy-o.


Burgundy makes you think silly things, Bordeaux makes you talk about them, and Champagne makes you do them ---

Brillat-Savarin

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...and yet another 3 for me:

Modern Greek (170 contemporary recipes from the Mediterranean) by Andy Harris

Mediterraneo (delicious recipes from the Mediterranean) by Clare Ferguson

Slow Cooking (not so fast food) by Joanne Glynn

I picked these 3 up at Williams-Sonoma over the weekend on the sale table: $7 for the three of 'em! I was amazed and so pleased! I was sorry, however, to see that Paula Wolfert's Slow Mediterranean Kitchen was among the carnage at something like $3.99. I have a copy already, and since weight was an issue I couldn't see picking up a spare for some friend I don't know yet. I did, however, talk the friend who was with me into picking up a copy.

Thanks to the Free Cookbooks! thread Susan in Fl and I exchanged cookbooks, leaving the balance even in this case. My take was the 1942, 1944 edition of The Good Housekeeping Cookbook. It's a fun item, and completes my gang from that time, since Mom gave me her old banged-up copies of The Joy of Cooking and the Better Homes & Gardens Cookbook from about the same time. Thanks, Susan!

I still have a couple of cookbooks begging on that thread, by the way, although I think one may be on the verge of being claimed.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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3 more I had on order arrived:

Taste by David Rosengarten

It's All American Food ditto

Paris Boulangerie-Patisserie by Linda Dannenberg


SuzySushi

"She sells shiso by the seashore."

My eGullet Foodblog: A Tropical Christmas in the Suburbs

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The Medieval Kitchen: Recipes from France and Italy

By: Odile Redon, et al. Looks interesting,

Indonesian Regional Food and Cookery

By: Sri Owen. Have wnated this fantastic book for a long time

Splendid Table: 500 Years of Eating in Northern Italy By: L.R. Kasper. Wow, what a wonderful book, pity about the quality of the photgraphs.

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272 cookbooks... wow. I've slowed down over the last couple of years. :)

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I'm down 2 books because of the Free Cookbooks! thread, but since they went to other eGulleteers the overall count should be unchanged. I don't know whether either of the recipients has already weighed in here. I forgot to ask them to.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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My neighbor is having garage sale and I picked up: Essentials of Italian Cooking by Marcella Hazan for .25 !!!!

It's in excellent ( never been read/ used) condition. Besides the fact that it cost only a quarter... my 7th grade daughter bought it for me :wub: .

Other than that... I'll have to do a re-count. I haven't been keeping track.

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Does FG's book count? I mean, it's about food.....


Dave Valentin

Retired Explosive Detection K9 Handler

"So, what if we've got it all backwards?" asks my son.

"Got what backwards?" I ask.

"What if chicken tastes like rattlesnake?" My son, the Einstein of the family.

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I have about 80 at the moment... though probably about 20 more in storage waiting to go to the used book store.

Funny, I thought I had more.... must go cookbook shopping :wub:


sarah

Always take a good look at what you're about to eat. It's not so important to know what it is, but it's critical to know what it was. --Unknown

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Must add five to my total; The Best Food Writing (series) 2001,2002,2003 & 2004.

Hopefully 2005 will be a Christmas presant from my son... and Alton Brown's I'm Only Here for The Food for $3.00 from the library store. :wub: That place is GREAT!


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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Add 1 more for me: Molto Italiano. It arrived at my house for inspection because either I forgot to tell the club not to send it (I do dither on occasion) or they decided to ignore me (also happens). Its fate hung in the balance for a while: I have too many cookbooks/that's not possible; space & money vs. gorgeous photos; then somebody made gnocchi from one of his recipes over on the Fresh Pasta cookoff. I was undone.

So much for unloading cookbooks. My poor husband. :raz:


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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I haven't yet counted my existing collection, but I just added in the last month:

James Peterson's Glorious French Food ($6.99 at The Christmas Tree Shop) :biggrin:

Classic Home Desserts, Richard Sax

A Taste of Country Cooking, Edna Lewis

Bread, Eric Treuille

Iced Tea, Fred Thompson

Preserves, Lindy Wildsmith


Diana Burrell, freelance writer/author

The Renegade Writer's Query Letters That Rock (Marion Street Press, Nov. 2006)

DianaCooks.com

My eGullet blog

The Renegade Writer Blog

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24 so far...but it's my birthday this weekend, so hopefully I'll be adding to that tally! :biggrin:


Edited by Megan Blocker (log)

"We had dry martinis; great wing-shaped glasses of perfumed fire, tangy as the early morning air." - Elaine Dundy, The Dud Avocado

Queenie Takes Manhattan

eG Foodblogs: 2006 - 2007

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Only 12 from the Fall FOL sale. Now I'm counting the days until the spring sale.


Judy Amster

Cookbook Specialist and Consultant

amsterjudy@gmail.com

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Another one for me...The Cannery Seafood House Cookbook, by Frédéric Couton...

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OK, lets see here; Mastering the Art of French Cooking, I'm Only Here for the Food, an international cookbook whose name escapes me, and Marcella Says; so that's four more for me! :wub:


"Commit random acts of senseless kindness"

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