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FrogPrincesse

The Soup Topic (2013–)

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I have been going crazy w/ soup-lentil & pulled pork, turkey broth, & a good hit of balsamic. Today, I used a smoked turkey carcass to make pho broth, added Szechuan pepper, star anise, half a cinnamon stick, lots of white pepper, & a small piece of orange rind. I added rice noodles, leftover brisket & turkey, to make a faux pho. Next up, blackeyed peas w/ leftover ham...

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Gorndon Ramsey's broccoli soup with broccoli from my CSA. For the garnish, I did not have any goat cheese and used crème fraîche instead, a little bit of Abequina olive oil (which tastes bright and green), roasted hazelnuts, and fleur de sel.

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Have you seen the article about soups on Serious Eats? It has a systematic approach to soup-making that I find inspirational.

The Food Lab: How to Make Creamy Vegetable Soups Without a Recipe.

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3 Mushroom/Noodle Soup--

( Maitake, Shitake,Shimeji )/( Egg, Rice, Yam Noodles ), Marinated pork, Panchetta, Scarlett Runner Beans ( RG's )--Scallions, Parsley and Pepper Paste in a flavorful Asian broth

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Its good to have Morels

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Have you seen the article about soups on Serious Eats? It has a systematic approach to soup-making that I find inspirational.

The Food Lab: How to Make Creamy Vegetable Soups Without a Recipe.

Wonderful article ... Thanks for posting the link.

You are welcome. Let us know what new soups you come up with!

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Have you seen the article about soups on Serious Eats? It has a systematic approach to soup-making that I find inspirational.

The Food Lab: How to Make Creamy Vegetable Soups Without a Recipe.

Wonderful article ... Thanks for posting the link.

You are welcome. Let us know what new soups you come up with!

Right now I'm working on a wild rice and mushroom soup. I made it for a pot luck this past weekend and it got good reviews, but it still need some fine tuning. I'll post the recipe when it's finalized.

I meant to ask earlier, did you use a published recipe for your parsnip-cauliflower soup, or was it your own creation? I'd like to know what you did - Toots loves cauliflower and cauliflower soup, and I'm running out of riffs to keep her smiling :wink:

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 ... Shel


 

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Creamy curried cauliflower soup. Recipe from Whole Foods Market, tweaked per suggestions, roasted the cauliflower, onion, and garlic first. It is creamy from cooking in almond milk, then when soft you puree everything. I added some salt, white pepper, and a tiny bit of sugar to offset a slight bitterness (poor quality curry powder). You serve it with sunflower kernels that are toasted in curry. I think a dollop of chutney might be nice.

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"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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It has been cold and snowy and icy around these parts .... more so than in the last 20 years.

So far I have in the freezer : pasta e fagioli made with fresh cranberry beans, turkey noodle soup, vegetable beef soup, split pea soup and French onion. All are in 1/2 pint containers so they are perfect to throw into lunches and will be mostly thawed by time to eat.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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I LOVE vegetable soup in winter.

I have some leftover in the fridge now.

I buy loads of fresh vegs for my soup, including: kale, cabbage, fennel bulb, leeks, green beans, carrots, celery, onion, tomato (canned), potato, turnip and rutabaga. I also combine canned beef broth with the water for the liquid.

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Soups are an "everyday thing" for me, not just winter. I suppose that is because I have a soup-eating culture (Cantonese) in my background - so limiting soups to winter (or cold weather) is simply a weird, weird concept to me. I would have a (hot) soup anytime in the year, even in the hottest part of summer; it just simply is a soothing dish that accords to my preferences...and to quite a lot of folks elsewhere too. I also prefer soups with definite pieces in them - as opposed to a blended, homogenized concoction (with some exceptions) - in the E/SE Asian manner; whereas many "soups" in the Western tradition require such whipped-to-bits liquids to be considered soups although there are exceptions, such as including those mentioned by suzilighting. YMMV, obviously.


Edited by huiray (log)
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I recently made celery soup from a Barbara Kafka recipe. I wasn't expecting it to be anywhere near as good as it was, much more than the sum of its parts. One bunch of celery, two potatoes, an onion, some stock (I used fake, it was spur of the moment), S&P. Whizzed it with an immersion blender to smooth it out. You have to like celery, because that flavor is dominant. Next time I make it I'll use water rather than stock, I think the celery flavor will be even "crisper," which is the word that comes to mind.

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Like Huiray, we eat soup all year long. Supper is usually an alternating menu of soup or salad, interspersed with "Dessert as Supper" and popcorn with orange juleps.

DH made his very first potato soup and we had it last night. Best potato soup I've ever eaten. The man is a soup genius.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I forgot to take a pic of my vitamine bomb soup. Next time guys, sorry... :sad:

@Liuzhou nice idea for the ground black pepper.


"The way you cut your meat reflects the way you live."

Franchise Takeaway

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Lentil soup, "staple of a country upbringing". Shown before and after microwaving:

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A good chicken stock (particularly concentrated, this time) PC'd from water, chicken and a few black peppercorns. Plenty of onion & some carrot, sweated, and deglazed with a single glass of half-sour white wine. Red lentils - I ran just short this time and made up with a small amount of yellow split peas. Salt & pepper to season. This far into the winter I've had so many things tasting of bayleaf that I left it out entirely, stock & soup both.


QUIET!  People are trying to pontificate.

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Soups are an "everyday thing" for me, not just winter. I suppose that is because I have a soup-eating culture (Cantonese) in my background - so limiting soups to winter (or cold weather) is simply a weird, weird concept to me. I would have a (hot) soup anytime in the year, even in the hottest part of summer; it just simply is a soothing dish that accords to my preferences...and to quite a lot of folks elsewhere too. I also prefer soups with definite pieces in them - as opposed to a blended, homogenized concoction (with some exceptions) - in the E/SE Asian manner; whereas many "soups" in the Western tradition require such whipped-to-bits liquids to be considered soups although there are exceptions, such as including those mentioned by suzilighting. YMMV, obviously.

Huh.

I'm sort of anti-soup.

Old guys at the racetrack eat soup.

I still have teeth.

Soup is wet.

If soup is thick...eg bisque...or laden w stuff like french onion...it might be ok.

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Hi Huiray,Are there Viet Nam food? Looks so delicious :)

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Hi Huiray,Are there Viet Nam food? Looks so delicious :)

Welcome, Amoved.

Are you referring to the list of soups I made "recently" upthread? If so, thanks for the compliment.

As for Vietnamese soups in that list, there aren't any, specifically, although some of those I listed would also be available and made and eaten in Vietnam (perhaps with a local twist) as an appreciable part of the population in Vietnam are actually of Teochew extraction. (In fact, you can get around in many parts of Saigon/Ho Chi Minh City, especially in "Chinatown", by speaking Teochew rather than Vietnamese) I've made more "typically" Vietnamese soups myself before from scratch, though, such as phở or bún bò Huế; or variations of Tom Yum/sour shrimp or spicy fish ball soups and the like with or without the use of commercially available soup bases. Some of those were shown in older posts (e.g. for phở - see here and here). I'm sure you know that in a general sense Vietnamese soups usually tend to be noodle soups with lots of stuff (solid stuff) added to it or floating in it. Most E/SE Asian soups tend to be liquids w/ solid stuff in it, in fact, as opposed to the common blended/homogenized soups in the West.


Edited by huiray (log)
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Soup is something designed to assist and complement the Sandwich.

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Soup is something designed to assist and complement the Sandwich.

That's so sad. I suggest you expand your horizons.

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