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haresfur

A smallish thread about a smallish kitchen renovation

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We have started into fixing the kitchen after starting planning several years ago - almost as long as the dishwasher has been dead and the oven barely functional. And don't get me started on the non-exhaust fan.

 

Before the destruction but after removing all the crap:

 

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The fridge was replaced not too long ago and is staying where it is. We had to have its alcove expanded. Perhaps not the best ergonomic location but it fits. We aren't moving the other appliances or sink very far so are hoping the plumbing and electric are no big deal.

 

End of first day. We caught a couple of things in time. The fume hood and cupboards over the cook-top were set too low. They were going to set the sink as an over-mount when we had bought and under-mount. Apparently it could be done either way but silly us for not making it clear that the sink described as an undermount should be under the counter top. We decide the cupboard to the right of the oven should open the other way so we can get in there when cooking. Our mistake but I hope we can keep the oil, salt, pepper, etc. there rather than cluttering up the counter. The cabinet guy insisted that the cook-top couldn't be centred over the oven. I still don't understand why but not a big deal. It will be easier to get around the island when someone else is cooking but harder to squeeze past into the pantry.

 

It seems to me that the walls should have been re-done before the cabinets went up. I think this was easier on the cabinet guy who is doing most of the coordination but probably will be a pain for the plasterer. And we have some trim issues to work out.

 

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Day 2 fixing things, electrical work, and measuring for the countertops. Now we wait for them to be finished before much else can happen.

 

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Spock is not impressed.

 

 

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I don't like wasted space so before the island gets its counter top, here are the not-very-convenient cupboards that will be mostly hidden by the overhang on the sitting side. Should work for that pack-rat stuff I don't want to throw away but don't use often. Of course, the high cupboards will be used for some of that, too.

 

Another idea would have been to make the island even bigger and forgo the seating for more drawers, but the dining table is usually covered with sewing stuff.

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Edited by haresfur photo problem (log)
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2 hours ago, haresfur said:

... but the dining table is usually covered with sewing stuff.

 

We rarely, very rarely, eat at our dining table. Sewing stuff is there.

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Porthos Potwatcher
The Once and Future Cook

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Ours is dominated by a large vase of cut flowers, and has a small laptop semi-permanently at one end. Much of the rest is usually buried under pet and grandkid stuff, so any time more than one or two are sitting down to eat we need to spend a few minutes clearing the table first.


“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I though I was the only one who piled excess stuff on the dining room table.  We always ate in the kitchen unless there were too many guests for that.

Now my table is piled with my ipot(s) with extra lids, slow cooker, granite samples for the future kitchen replacement, incoming/outgoing packages, electric tea kettle, etc.

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On 11/28/2018 at 7:33 PM, haresfur said:

 

20181127_065234.thumb.jpg.05761a8888cc09af31b96208751ce1d7.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

I have not read through the whole thread.

In case you have not planed to do this, mine suggestion; get a clear piece of Plexiglas, about 18" high, to put in front of the sink in between  the window. Slash guard.

 

Beautiful renovation!

 

dcarch

 

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Looks like I’m one of the few who uses the DR table for eating. It’s either there or outdoors in nice weather.  We have a kitchen table that gets used for breakfast and maybe lunch. 

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4 hours ago, dcarch said:

 

 

I have not read through the whole thread.

In case you have not planed to do this, mine suggestion; get a clear piece of Plexiglas, about 18" high, to put in front of the sink in between  the window. Slash guard.

 

Beautiful renovation!

 

dcarch

 

 

I'm not quite sure what you mean with the Plexiglas - so we don't splash on the window?


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4 minutes ago, haresfur said:

 

I'm not quite sure what you mean with the Plexiglas - so we don't splash on the window?

 

The clear Plexiglas (polyurethane  plastic) to go in between the sink and the window. 

 

I am a sloppy cleaner, a lot of times water will get on the window.  So I installed the clear plastic on the window. 

 

dcarch

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Speaking of messy dining tables, here's ours with the kitchen stuff I thought we might need. Microwave, induction plate, sous vide, and the barbie outside should get us by.

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Busy day today. There were some scheduling issues with people showing up unexpectedly. I think my partner who has been at a conference asked the sparkies to come out because our evaporative cooler wasn't working - a breaker up in the attic on the unit had flipped. The bench tops came early in the morning and were installed. Then some remaining electrical work and installing appliances. So almost everything major is done. Still to do:

 

A little trim work that had to wait for the bench tops

The exhaust fan needs to vent up through the ceiling. Plumber forgot that.

Backsplash. The cabinet guy got a little testy with me because I forgot that we wanted holes for the knife rack, and made me do the measuring. Hope I got it right

We will do the painting.

We haven't even picked out flooring but are going with vinyl that will be installed on top of the old floor. We probably will have to plane a bit of the bottom of the door to make it fit.

I need to install a pot rack that was over the cooktop, but will now be over the window.

Then there's figuring out where everything is going to live.

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Bench tops were in by 9:00 AM. I tried to go to work for a few hours but it wasn't meant to be.

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I don't really like the microwave there but we will give it a try and see how it goes. Don't know if the induction plate will stay there. I wish they had mounted the oven a few cm higher. The cooktop and oven are made by Asko and they seem really well designed. I'm so excited to try the wok burner, and hope it has enough oomph. Dishwasher is a Bosch.

20181207_183352.thumb.jpg.24311147484732e461a3aaa2af3f7ee8.jpg

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Forgot to mention, the good thing about a reno in summer is being able to cook on the barbie. The bad thing is a house swarmed by flies. 😝

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The whole arrangement is coming together beautifully! I love the clean lines of the cabinetry. I agree with you that figuring out where to put things is a big challenge.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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@haresfur

 

I am enjoying what you are doing .

 

that being said

 

Im uneasy about that couter-top lip

 

on your central Island

 

hope its well braced underneath 

 

some one at some pint might sit on it 

 

Yikes !

 

thai you for sharing

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37 minutes ago, rotuts said:

 

on your central Island

hope its well braced underneath 

some one at some pint might sit on it 

Yikes !

 

 

That and kids run right into those hostile corners!

Otherwise a beautiful and functional design.

 

dcarch


Edited by dcarch (log)
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2 hours ago, rotuts said:

@haresfur

 

I am enjoying what you are doing .

 

that being said

 

Im uneasy about that couter-top lip

 

on your central Island

 

hope its well braced underneath 

 

some one at some pint might sit on it 

 

Yikes !

 

thai you for sharing

 

You are right, I am concerned about that, too. Something to keep in mind if we get wild in the kitchen.

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1 hour ago, dcarch said:

 

That and kids run right into those hostile corners!

Otherwise a beautiful and functional design.

 

dcarch

 

 

They were supposed to round over the edges and corners but did not. At this point, I can't see fighting it.

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I'm glad people are thinking about what they like and what they would do differently. There is so much to consider, and so many compromises to make.


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18 minutes ago, haresfur said:

 

They were supposed to round over the edges and corners but did not. At this point, I can't see fighting it.

 Catch a hip once or twice on those corners and you’ll wish you had.😂

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

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27 minutes ago, haresfur said:

 

They were supposed to round over the edges and corners but did not. At this point, I can't see fighting it.

 

No problem. Have a couple of tennis balls to cover those corners when you have children visiting.

Those corners are at children's eye level.

 

(not my picture, From Google image)

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dcarch

 


Edited by dcarch (log)

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2 hours ago, KennethT said:

@haresfur You have an evaporative cooler?  Do you mean an air conditioner or the greenhouse type "swamp cooler"?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Evaporative_cooler

 

Yeah, like a swamp cooler that they use in places like Arizona. Air up on the roof runs past wet pads and is cooled then is blown into the house. It's a single pass system so you keep windows cracked to vent. I suppose it blows heat from the oven out, too. It's very energy efficient but does use water. Of course when the humidity rises, it doesn't do much.

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21 hours ago, haresfur said:

 

20181207_183352.thumb.jpg.24311147484732e461a3aaa2af3f7ee8.jpg

 

So I was getting ready to was some dishes before putting them back in cupboards, looked down and thought, "You know, since the cooktop was moved towards the pantry, we probably could have swapped the sink and the dishwasher so there would be room for dirty dishes on one side and the dish drainer on the other." That has been one of my issues with the old design. It would have at least been worth discussing with the cabinet guy. Hard to see everything when you are headed down a certain path, and I'm still happy with what we have.

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